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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Baltimore riots. (search)
favorable to the perpetuation of the Union of the States. This. meeting was one of the largest and most enthusiastic which had ever been held in the city. Every available spot was occupied, and the officers and speakers comprised some of the best citizens of Baltimore, among them Reverdy Johnson, Governor Bradford, and Judge Pearre. Subsequently, another mass meeting was held of citizens in favor of restoring the constitutional union of the States, in which the Hon. R. M. McLane, Mr. S. Teackle Wallis, Hon. Joshua Vansant, Dr. A. C. Robinson, and other well-known Southern sympathizers took an active part. Even as late as April 12th, when the siege of Fort Sumter.had begun, and only one week before the riot, two men were assaulted and mobbed, one on Baltimore, the other on South street,for wearing a Southern cockade. On Sunday, April 14th, five days only before the riot, a secession flag was displayed from the mast of the Fanny Crenshaw lying at Chase's wharf, but was hauled down
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
. Disunion and its results to the South. Recognition of the Confederate States considered, in reply to the letters of Historicus in the London Times, by Juridicus. Commercial Enfranchisement of the Confederate States. Cause and Contrast, by T. W. MacMahon. Address to Christians throughout the World, signed by ninety-five Clergymen of the Confederate States. The American Union, its Effect on National Character and Policy, by James Spence. Richmond: West & Johnston, 1863. Reply of S. Teackle Wallis, Esq., to the Letter of Hon. John Sherman, published by the Officers of the First Maryland Infantry, 1863. Address on the Constitution and Laws of the Confederate States of America, by Hon. Robt. H. Smith. Confederate States' Almanac of 1862. Senator Hammond and the Tribune, by, Troup. Rev. J. H. Thornwell, D. D., of Columbia, S. C., on the State of the Country in 1861. The North and the South, by John Forsyth, of Mobile, Ala. Proceedings of the Congress of the Confederate States,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
a great mass-meeting in Monument Square. Speeches were made by Dr. A. C. Robinson, Mayor Brown, William P. Preston, S. Teackle Wallis, John E. Wethered, Robert L. McLane and Governor Hicks. The people were counseled to rely upon the authorities, which would protect them. The invasion of the city and the slaughter of citizens were denounced. Mr. Wallis said it was not necessary to speak. If the blood of citizens on the stones in the street does not speak, he said, it is useless for man to spdent also desired the Governor, but he was not in the city, and so the Mayor went; George W. Dobbin, John C. Brune and S. T. Wallis accompanying him at his request. The special train left Baltimore at 7:30 and arrived in Washington at 10. At the in It was composed of John C. Brune, Ross Winans, Henry M. Warfield, J. Hanson Thomas, T. Parkin Scott, H. M. Morfit, S. Teackle Wallis, Charles H. Pitts, William G. Harrison, and Lawrence Sangston. The Mayor and the police authorities were indefat
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
a great mass-meeting in Monument Square. Speeches were made by Dr. A. C. Robinson, Mayor Brown, William P. Preston, S. Teackle Wallis, John E. Wethered, Robert L. McLane and Governor Hicks. The people were counseled to rely upon the authorities, which would protect them. The invasion of the city and the slaughter of citizens were denounced. Mr. Wallis said it was not necessary to speak. If the blood of citizens on the stones in the street does not speak, he said, it is useless for man to spdent also desired the Governor, but he was not in the city, and so the Mayor went; George W. Dobbin, John C. Brune and S. T. Wallis accompanying him at his request. The special train left Baltimore at 7:30 and arrived in Washington at 10. At the in It was composed of John C. Brune, Ross Winans, Henry M. Warfield, J. Hanson Thomas, T. Parkin Scott, H. M. Morfit, S. Teackle Wallis, Charles H. Pitts, William G. Harrison, and Lawrence Sangston. The Mayor and the police authorities were indefat
city. The residence of a gentleman on Chatham street, near Egbert, was visited by the Federal police, and he was required to leave his house in obedience to the mandate from Washington. He inquired by what authority he was thus arrested, and was informed that it was by the authority of the Provost Marshal of Washington city. The residences of the following members of the House of Delegates were also visited, and those gentlemen arrested: Wm. G. Harrison, Lawrence Sangston. S. Teackle Wallis, T. P. Scott, Henry M. Morfit, Ross Winans, and Henry M. Warfield. The city residence of Dr. J. Hanson Thomas was visited, but he was in the country, and escaped until his return to the city yesterday morning, when he was taken into custody. Charles H. Pitts, Esq., was also in the country, but was arrested yesterday morning soon after reaching the city. The residence of John C. Brune, Esq., on Catharine street, was visited, but he was absent at the time, and up to late last night ha
re, seizing all the arms of any sort in the possession of the citizens. Gen. Schenck also, on Thursday, closed the "Maryland Club House." The American says it was the rendezvous of the elite of secession in Baltimore, and was so exclusive that in six years only 352 visitors had been admitted there. Among them were Vallandigham, Voorhies, John C. Breckinridge, Marquis of Harlington, Bright of Indiana, and R. T. Merrick of Chicago. Among the members of the Club were Wm Key Heward, S. Teackle Wallis, H. B. Latrobe, and others. A military guard was placed by the Yankees over the building. Several bundles of Vallandigham a speeches were found in the building. Dispatch from Rosecrans announcing — the occupation of Tullahoma. The Washington papers publish the following telegram from Gen. Rosecrans: Headquarters, Tullahoma, Tenn., July 1. --I telegraphed you on Monday the occupation of Shelbyville and Manchester. On Monday it rained hard all day, rendering the roads i
The Daily Dispatch: October 19, 1863., [Electronic resource], Secret history of the subjugation of Maryland. (search)
their names indicates the intensity of secession principles. Among them we find the following bad cases: R. M. Denison, 4; J. W. Dennis, 4; John B. Brown, 4; G. W. Goldsborough, 4; Barnes Compton, 3; H. M. Warfield, 3; T. Parkin Scott, 3; S. Teackle Wallis, 3; W. H. Legg, 3; G. Kilborn, 3. In the Senate — Franklin Whittaker, 4; Coleman Yellott, 4; Thos. J. McKaig, 3; Teagle Townshend, 3. Suggestions of arrest — the Altered Complexion of the Legislature. I suggest the arrest of the fueen Anne, William H. Legg, William L. Sharkey; St. Mary's, Clark J. Durant, George H. Morgan; Somerset, James U. Dennis; Talbot, Alexander Chaplain, J. Lawrence Jones; Washington, Martin Eakle, John C. Brining; Worcester, George W. Landing. Wallis, Pitt, Scott, Sangston, Morfit, Winans, Thomas, Harrison, and Warfield, of Baltimore city, and Dennison and Quinlan, of Baltimore county, are in custody. The list I marked with you has been carefully revised and corrected by the Legislative