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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 16: the battle of Fair Oaks (search)
. The reason for not connecting with Birney's brigade, now under command of Colonel Ward, was that it was much farther back from the enemy than French expected to fihim said: No, no, colonel, they are our men Probably thinking them detached from Ward, Miller in his strong voice commanded: Recover arms! and called out: Who are yoPennsylvania under Lee and Miles could administer, caught sight of the right of Ward's brigade and opened upon them a brisk fusillade. Ward threw back the right of Ward threw back the right of my old regiment, the Third Maine, and moved his other regiments so as to come forward in echelon. He began by firing volleys, then inclining more to the right chargesame time Lieutenant Howard and I were leading our two regiments into the melee. Ward's vigorous onset cleared that important quarter of the pressing enemy. To the left of Ward came Hooker, his front making a right angle with the railroad. lie was ready for his part. His advance on account of thickets and swamps was slow but
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 27: Chattanooga and the battle of Missionary Ridge (search)
re very active between Chattanooga, Dalton, and Knoxville, the wing of Thomas's army to which I belonged-probably about 20,000 strong, counting up the remaining divisions of the Eleventh Corps under Schurz and Von Steinwehr, and those of Geary and Ward belonging to the Twelfth Corps, with corps and artillery transportation reckoned in (for the latter especially afforded many diligent employees)-remained in our first camp. This temporary city in Lookout Valley had General Joseph Hooker for itso woman) wants him to become a Christian! He is trying. On March 19th I gave an account of a scouting expedition, one among many: On Wednesday, a half hour before sunrise, my staff and myself set out for Trenton, Ga. We took an escort from General Ward's command-200 mounted infantry. The road lies between Lookout and Raccoon all the way. Lookout Creek, about sixty feet wide, winds its way through the whole distance for twenty miles, the crookedest stream you ever saw. The valley of this cre
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 29: battle of Resaca and the Oostanaula (search)
advance of Hooker, which, we confess, was not very successful and attended with loss, the Twenty-third Corps, or a good part of it, was brought over to aid Hooker and me at any instant when Hooker should make a break through the enemy's main line. It is said one regiment, the Seventieth Indiana, sprang from a thicket upon the lunette and, as they came on, the Confederate artillerists blazed away without checking our men. They entered the embrasures; they shot the gunners. In this effort Ward was badly wounded. Colonel Benjamin Harrison immediately took his place and gallantly continued the work. The fire from intrenchments behind the lunette became severe, being delivered in volley after volley; too severe to render it proper to remain there; so that Harrison, getting ready to make another vigorous advance, drew back his line a few yards under cover of the lunette hill. Here a color bearer by the name of Hess, One Hundred and Twenty-ninth Illinois, chagrined to hear the sh
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 34: battle of Peach Tree Creek (search)
uilt. His officers were next assuring him that Ward's division of Hooker's corps was near and aboutrger than his own, launched against him. General Ward, the successor in the division of General Bunder Benjamin Harrison, afterwards President. Ward for support had been all the time in Newton's mrds off. It was a refreshing sight. There were Ward's skirmishers. They did not retire at the prolthem. They kept their advanced positions till Ward could make his deployments behind them. Following the impulse of a soldier's instinct, Ward did not suffer his men to wait without cover, pale and were thus quickly relieved. The struggle in Ward's front proper was a little prolonged by fitfuloring, striking Williams's division, next after Ward, and carrying it on so as to involve at least or. His men had skirmished up a hill abreast to Ward and Newton, across the Shoal Creek. Geary was quickly enough when duty demanded it, hastened Ward's artillery to the proper spot near Newton's br