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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 1 1 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
ear that these vast armies have moved side by side, sometimes crossing each other's tracks, through a difficult country of over 138 miles in length, without confusion or trouble. Captain Dayton has also filled the duties of my adjutant-general, making all orders and carrying on the official correspondence. Three inspectors-general completed my staff: Brig. Gen. J. M. Corse, who has since been assigned the command of a division of the Sixteenth Corps at the request of General Dodge; Lieut. Col. W. Warner, of the Seventy-sixth Ohio, and Lieut. Col. Charles Ewing, inspector-general of the Fifteenth Corps and captain Thirteenth U. S. Regulars. These officers, of singular energy and intelligence, have been of immense assistance to me in handling these large armies. My three armies in the field were commanded by able officers, my equals in rank and experience-Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas, Maj. Gen. J. M. Schofield, and Maj. Gen. O. O. Howard. With such commanders, I had only to indica
ight by throwing forward his whole line towards the base of Rocky Face Creek into the gaps where the engagement took place in February last. Much difficulty was experienced in crossing the creek, which the rebels had inundated since our last visit to Buzzard Roost; yet the difficulty was overcome by wading the stream, an attack was at once made up the knolls and hills on the left of the railroad, which were gallantly carried by our skirmishers, the One Hundred and Thirteenth Ohio, Lieutenant Colonel Warner, occupying the hill on the immediate left of the railroad, while Morgan's brigade, which occupied the centre, carried the hill to the left, or immediately to the right of Rocky Face Ridge. Morgan's brigade was immediately thrown round on the left of the hill, carried by it, and pushed rapidly forward through a gap separating it from Rocky Face. In his attack the fire was quite brisk, and his loss in wounded was about thirty. At six in the morning brisk skirmish fire was heard
ight by throwing forward his whole line towards the base of Rocky Face Creek into the gaps where the engagement took place in February last. Much difficulty was experienced in crossing the creek, which the rebels had inundated since our last visit to Buzzard Roost; yet the difficulty was overcome by wading the stream, an attack was at once made up the knolls and hills on the left of the railroad, which were gallantly carried by our skirmishers, the One Hundred and Thirteenth Ohio, Lieutenant Colonel Warner, occupying the hill on the immediate left of the railroad, while Morgan's brigade, which occupied the centre, carried the hill to the left, or immediately to the right of Rocky Face Ridge. Morgan's brigade was immediately thrown round on the left of the hill, carried by it, and pushed rapidly forward through a gap separating it from Rocky Face. In his attack the fire was quite brisk, and his loss in wounded was about thirty. At six in the morning brisk skirmish fire was heard
h are but a small proportion of the total number: Colonel Dan. McCook, commanding brigade, arm, severe; Colonel Harmon, One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Illinois, killed; Lieutenant-Colonel Clancey, Fifty-second Ohio, spent ball, slight; Lieutenant-Colonel Warner, One Hundred and Thirteenth Ohio, arm fractured, severe; Major Yeager, One Hundred and Twenty-first Illinois, severe; Captain Cook, Tenth Michigan, mortal; Captain Clason, One Hundred and Twenty-first Illinois, severe; Captain Neighbor,and carrying on the official correspondence. Three Inspectors-General completed my staff. Brigadier-General J. M. Corse, who has since been assigned the command of a division of the Sixteenth corps, at the request of General Dodge; Lieutenant-Colonel W. Warner, of the Seventy-sixth Ohio, and Lieutenant-Colonel Charles Ewing, Inspector-General of the Fifteenth corps and Captain Thirteenth United States Regulars. These officers, of singular energy and intelligence, have been of immense assi
, II., 4-7. Ward, A., IX., 175. Ward, Elizabeth S. P., A message, IX., 144, 145. Ward, J. H.: VI, 96, 97, 99, 308. Ward, J. H. H., X., 227. Ward, W. T.: III., 125; X., 91. Ward, W. W., VII, 21. Ware, C. P., IX., 352. Ware, J. H., X., 2. Warehouse: on the banks of the Rappahannock, used as hospital, VII., 270. Warfield, H. M., VII., 198. Waring, G. E., X., 23, 24. Warley, A. F., VI., 192. Warner, J. M., X., 307. Warner, W., X., 296. Warner,, U. S. S.: III., 318; VI., 230. Warren, Fitz-H., X., 205. Warren, G. K.: I., 32, 70 seq.; II., 251, 252, 253, 255; III., 30, 34, 36, 41, 42, 43, 44, 54, 56, 58, 64, 67, 72, 73, 74, 75, 83, 84, 86, 90, 176, 178, 197, 199, 204, 284, 318, 344; IV., 119; headquarters of, at Spotsylvania, IV., 207; VIII., 246, 327, 328, 330; IX., 225; X., 183, 200. Warren, Fort, Mass. (see also Fort Warren, Mass.), I., 191. Warrenburg, Mo., I., 360. Warrento