hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 6 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 6 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 4 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches. You can also browse the collection for David A. Wasson or search for David A. Wasson in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, Lowell (search)
n whether the appointment would be confirmed on account of his transcendental tendencies, and his connection with the Anti-slavery Standard; but Longfellow threw the whole weight of his influence in Lowell's favor, and this would seem to have decided it. From this time till 1873 Lowell was more of a prose-writer than a poet, and his essays on Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, and other English poets are the best of their kind, --not brilliant, but appreciative, penetrating, and well-considered. Wasson said of him that no other critic in the English tongue came so near to expressing the inexpressible as Lowell. One could wish that his studies in Shakespeare had been more extended. He treats the subject as if he felt it was too great for him; but he was the first to take notice that the play of Richard III. indicated in its main extent a different hand, and it is now generally admitted to have been the work of Fletcher. With the keenest insight he noticed that the magician Prospero w
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, Centennial Contributions (search)
best friend in Europe, spoke of it in rather a disparaging manner. The Mountain and the Squirrel and several others have been translated into German, but not those which we here consider the best of them. On the other hand, Dr. William H. Furness considered Emerson heaven-high above our other poets; C. P. Cranch preferred him to Longfellow; Dr. F. H. Hedge looked upon him as the first poet of his time; Rev. Samuel Longfellow and Rev. Samuel Johnson held a very similar opinion, and David A. Wasson considered Emerson's Problem one of the great poems of the century. These men were all poets themselves, though they did not make a profession of it, and in that character were quite equal to Matthew Arnold, whose lecture on Emerson was evidently written under unfavorable influences. They were men who had passed through similar experiences to those which developed Emerson's mind and character, and could therefore comprehend him better than others. We all feel that Emerson's poetry