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Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry 15 1 Browse Search
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Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry, Chapter 11: the Bloody angle (search)
anding at the angle of the works was cut down by the bullets fired from both sides, but mostly by men of the 121st. Colonel Upton noting that the enemy kept seeking shelter behind it from which to fire upon the battery and our troops, ordered Captain Weaver with a part of the regiment to keep up a constant fire upon that point, and thus prevent the Rebels from putting their heads above the works. After keeping up this fire for several hours the men saw the tree begin to waver and it soon after from this label is that men of the Second Corps are to be credited with the cutting down of the tree. But the fact is that the Second Brigade of the First Division of the Sixth Corps, occupied the position directly in front of the tree, and Captain Weaver and his men fired for hours directly at the Rebels seeking shelter behind it, until it fell. For the particular part which the 121st took in this affair we may turn again to the narrative of Colonel Beckwith. It rained all night and
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry, Chapter 16: with Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley (search)
so threw them into such confusion that they did not recover from it during the rest of the conflict. Due credit was given to General Upton, and the 121st New York in the official report of the battle. But Lossing, in his Pictorial History of the Civil War, gives the credit to General Emory instead of Upton and to 131st New York instead of to the 121st New York. The death of General Rodes at this crisis of the battle was a severe blow to the Confederates, as was that of Russell to us. Captain Weaver in giving an account of this special affair at the crisis of the battle says that Captain Cronkite rushed out alone and captured a Rebel flag. Neither Beckwith nor Colonel Cronkite mentions this in their accounts of the affair. Of the result of the battle Colonel Beckwith says, We were all greatly encouraged by the splendid victory we had won. We knew the men we had been fighting and we considered them as good as any, if not the best, in Lee's army, but they were no match for us on ope
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry, Chapter 18: back to Petersburg and winter quarters (search)
urksville Junction. Then the officers were duly mustered. During the winter also changes were made in the field and staff, by appointment and promotion. Dr. James P. Kimball was commissioned Assistant Surgeon. Vice Dr. Holt resigned. Frank E. Lowe was promoted to be Adjutant, Sergeant Major J. L. Morthon, Sergeant Newber, N. A. Armstrong, Thomas J. Hassett and Philip R. Woodcock were promoted to lieutenants. Morris C. Foote, of Cooperstown was also commissioned as lieutenant. Lieut. E. C. Weaver resigned on account of sickness and Lieutenant Kelly died of disease. The ordinary duties of camp life, drills, picket and fatigue, in trenches and forts, was broken once when in February 5th to 8th the brigade was sent to support the 5th Corps on an expedition to Hatcher's Run. At one time the line of the 5th Corps was broken and some of the troops fell back in confusion. The brigade restored and stiffened the line and became lightly engaged. It crossed the Run to the front twi
Adams, May 10 to October 14, 1864; L. B. Paine, December 16, 1864 to June 25, 1865. First Lieutenants: U. F. Doubleday, August 23, 1862 to May 3, 1863; C. E. Butts, April 10, 1863 to April 19, 1864; H. C. VanScoy, March 15 to May 13, 1864; E. C. Weaver, May 19, 1864 to February 14, 1865; J. H. Heath, February 17 to June 25, 1865. Second Lieutenants: M. C. Casler, August 18 to December 31, 1862; S. Miller, February 20 to May 13, 1863; H. C. VanScoy, May 20, 1863 to March 15, 1864; E. C. WeE. C. Weaver, May 3 to May 10, 1864; N. A. Armstrong, February 10 to June 25, 1865. Company I Captains: John S. Kidder, August 18, 1862 to June 22, 1865. First Lieutenants: J. D. Douw, August 23, 1862 to April 23, 1863; D. Bates, May 4, 1863 to March 15, 1864; F. W. Foote, March 16 to September 24, 1864; J. H. Heath, December 24, 1864 to February 17, 1865; P. R. Woodcock, February 22 to June 25, 1865. Second Lieutenants: D. Bates, August 18, 1862 to May 4, 1863; F. W. Foote, July 20, 1862 to
Adams, May 10 to October 14, 1864; L. B. Paine, December 16, 1864 to June 25, 1865. First Lieutenants: U. F. Doubleday, August 23, 1862 to May 3, 1863; C. E. Butts, April 10, 1863 to April 19, 1864; H. C. VanScoy, March 15 to May 13, 1864; E. C. Weaver, May 19, 1864 to February 14, 1865; J. H. Heath, February 17 to June 25, 1865. Second Lieutenants: M. C. Casler, August 18 to December 31, 1862; S. Miller, February 20 to May 13, 1863; H. C. VanScoy, May 20, 1863 to March 15, 1864; E. C. We25, 1865. First Lieutenants: U. F. Doubleday, August 23, 1862 to May 3, 1863; C. E. Butts, April 10, 1863 to April 19, 1864; H. C. VanScoy, March 15 to May 13, 1864; E. C. Weaver, May 19, 1864 to February 14, 1865; J. H. Heath, February 17 to June 25, 1865. Second Lieutenants: M. C. Casler, August 18 to December 31, 1862; S. Miller, February 20 to May 13, 1863; H. C. VanScoy, May 20, 1863 to March 15, 1864; E. C. Weaver, May 3 to May 10, 1864; N. A. Armstrong, February 10 to June 25, 1865.