Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Max Weber or search for Max Weber in all documents.

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and commenced the march toward Norfolk, with Generals Mansfield and Weber, who proceeded on the direct route by way of Tanner's Creek bridge,able condition. At about one o'clock the leading regiment, under Max Weber, came to the bridge and found it burning, having just been set on The first regiment landed was the Twentieth New-York, known as Max Weber's regiment, who pushed on immediately, under command of Gen. WebeGen. Weber, and were at eight o'clock in the morning picketed within five miles of Norfolk. The First Delaware, Colonel Andrews, pushed forward at nuation of Norfolk is steadily progressing. I just learn that Gen. Max Weber has advanced to within three miles of Norfolk without meeting w under command of Major-Gen. Wool, with Brig.-Generals Mansfield, Max Weber, and Viele. The first division of the troops landed at the Port, (the Twentieth New-York, under Max Weber,) immediately started forward, accompanied by the Independent Lowell artillery company of Capt. Dav
Staff, Sumner's Corps: Colonel: My division, composed of Brig.-Gens. Max Weber's and Kimball's brigades, and three regiments of new levieswas forded by the division marching in three columns of brigades, Max Weber on the left, the new regiments in the centre, and Kimball's brigak the force which had taken a strong position for defence. While Max Weber was clearing his front and driving before him the enemy's first lttle sustained by my division. The gallantry and coolness of Gen. Max Weber excited the admiration of the whole command. With consummate s on the left of Gen. Sedgwick's division and in the third line--Generals Weber and Morris forming the first and second lines. In this position I moved directly forward about three fourths of a mile, when General Weber encountered the enemy's pickets and drove them back, and soon caed my brigade forward and formed my line in front, on the left of Gen. Weber. My right wing, consisting of the Fourteenth regiment Indiana vo
Staff, Sumner's Corps: Colonel: My division, composed of Brig.-Gens. Max Weber's and Kimball's brigades, and three regiments of new levieswas forded by the division marching in three columns of brigades, Max Weber on the left, the new regiments in the centre, and Kimball's brigak the force which had taken a strong position for defence. While Max Weber was clearing his front and driving before him the enemy's first lttle sustained by my division. The gallantry and coolness of Gen. Max Weber excited the admiration of the whole command. With consummate s on the left of Gen. Sedgwick's division and in the third line--Generals Weber and Morris forming the first and second lines. In this position I moved directly forward about three fourths of a mile, when General Weber encountered the enemy's pickets and drove them back, and soon caed my brigade forward and formed my line in front, on the left of Gen. Weber. My right wing, consisting of the Fourteenth regiment Indiana vo