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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 22 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 12 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Bragg's invasion of Kentucky. (search)
on the field thus bravely won. Our entire force engaged, infantry, cavalry and artillery, was but 16,000 men. Our loss was 510 killed, 2635 wounded, and 251 missing. Generals S. A. M. Wood and Cleburne were disabled, and a large proportion of higher officers were killed or wounded. Three of General Wood's staff were among the killed. General Buell lost 916 killed, 2943 wounded, and 489 captured by the Confederates. General Jackson, commanding a division, and General Terrill and Colonel Webster, commanding brigades, were among the Federal killed, and Colonel Lytle was among the wounded. At every point of battle the Confederates had been victorious. We had engaged three corps of the Federal army; Only a small part of Crittenden's corps was in action; see p. 31.--editors. one of these, McCook's, to use Buell's language, was very much crippled, one division, again to use his language, having in fact almost entirely disappeared as a body. After darkness had closed a batt
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., East Tennessee and the campaign of Perryville. (search)
nearly 900, all of which belonged to Sheridan's division and one of Mitchell's brigades; and about 450 in all were taken prisoners; total loss, 4348. The force actually engaged on the Union side numbered about 22,000, though more came into position for battle near the close. All of the force had a good number of new regiments. One of McCook's divisions was composed entirely of new regiments, with one exception. Its division commander, Jackson, and its two brigade commanders, Terrill and Webster, were killed. The enemy claim to have fought the battle, according to Bragg's report, with 16,000 men. His loss is reported at 3396, of which 251 were prisoners. He captured some artillery that he did not carry off, though he exchanged some of his pieces for better ones. Not long before the commencement of this partial but fierce contest, a staff-officer arrived from General Thomas and reported two divisions of the right corps up — the last had not yet arrived. The enemy was in front,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 1.5 (search)
otograph taken in 1885. The farm-house stands near Doctor's Creek, under the ridge occupied by Rousseau; and the view is from the old Mackville pike. [See map, p. 24.] (Lytle's and Harris's) and Terrill's brigade of Jackson's division. Webster's brigade of Jackson's division had not yet come into position, and Starkweather's brigade of Rousseau's division had not yet reached the field. Just previously to this the enemy, in pursuance of his plan of attack, had begun to engage Sheridlater, while still striving to rally his broken troops, he was mortally wounded. Colonel Charles Denby, of the 42d Indiana regiment, says: It is curious that the night before the battle [of Perryville] Generals Jackson and Terrill and Colonel Webster were discussing the chances of being hit in an engagement. Their opinion was that men would never be frightened if they considered the doctrine of probabilities and how slight the chance was of any particular person being killed. Theory fa
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.63 (search)
sidered himself an independent commander. All question as to McClernand's position disappeared in the reorganization of the forces under General Grant, December 18th, 1862, into four army corps: the Thirteenth to be commanded by Mc-Clernand, the Fifteenth by Sherman, the Sixteenth by Hurlbut, the Seventeenth by McPherson. Editors. *The origin of the expedition down the Mississippi, December 12th to January 4th, under Sherman's command, is given in General Grant's Personal Memoirs (C. L. Webster & Co.), as follows: During the delay at Oxford in repairing railroads, I learned that an expedition down the Mississippi now was inevitable, and, desiring to have a competent commander in charge, I ordered Sherman, on the 8th of December, back to Memphis to take charge. . . . As stated, my action in sending Slierman back was expedited by a desire to get him in command of the forces separated from my direct supervision. I feared that delay might bring McClernand, who was his senio
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The assault on Chickasaw bluffs. (search)
h greater intrepidity. They were terribly repulsed but not beaten. There was neither rout nor panic, but our troops fell back slowly and angrily to our own line, halted, re-formed, and, if ordered, would again have rushed to the assault. As in all cases of repulse or defeat, contention and crimination have arisen as to the cause of the disaster. Sherman, in his report, Official Records, Vol. XVII., Part I., p. 610. and Grant, in his Memoirs, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant (C. L. Webster & Co.), Vol. I., p. 437. give a satisfactory cause — the true one in my opinion — the impregnable position of the enemy. Sherman says, in his Memoirs, Vol. I., p. 292: Had he [General Morgan] used with skill and boldness one of his brigades, in addition to that of Blair, he could have made a lodgment on the bluff, which would have opened a door for our whole force to follow. The fact is that, beside the four regiments of Blair's brigade, the attacking forces included four regi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.69 (search)
t I found afterward that I had entirely under-estimated Pemberton's strength.--From Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. C. L. Webster & Co. Up to this point our movements had been made without serious opposition. My line was now nearly parallel wickly enough could turn upon Pemberton before he could attack me in the rear.--From Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. C. L. Webster & Co. Accordingly, all previous orders given during the day for movements on the 13th were annulled by new ones. icers had followed, the enemy must either have fallen back or been cut off.--From P personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. C. L. Webster & Co. Instead of this he sent orders to Hovey, who belonged to his corps, to join on to his right flank. Hovey was b 3. General Grant receiving General Pemberton's message. From a sketch made at the time. In his Personal Memoirs (C. L. Webster & Co.) General Grant says: On leaving Bruinsburg for the front I left my son Frederick, who had joined me a few weeks
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 9.97 (search)
egraphed me to send all available forces to Memphis, and thence east along the Memphis and Charleston railroad to cooperate with Rosecrans. This instruction was repeated two days later, but I did not get even the first until the 23d of the month. As fast as transports could be provided all the troops except a portion of the Seventeenth Corps were forwarded under Sherman, whose services up to this time demonstrated his superior fitness for a separate command. In his Personal Memoirs (C. L. Webster & Co.) General Grant says: Soon after negotiations were opened with General Pemberton for the surrender of the city, I notified Sherman, whose troops extended from Haynes's Bluff on the left to the crossing of the Vicksburg and Jackson road over the Big Black on the right, and directed him to hold his command in readiness to advance and drive the enemy from the State as soon as Vicksburg surrendered. . . . Johnston heard of the surrender of Vicksburg almost as soon as it occurred, an
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.14 (search)
in the rear and coming up; 2. He would draw the enemy's cavalry after him, and thus better protect our flanks, rear, and trains than by remaining with the army; 3. His absence would save the trains drawing his forage and other supplies from Fredericksburg, which had now become our base. He started at daylight the next morning, and accomplished more than was expected. It was sixteen days before he got back to the Army of the Potomac. From Personal Memoris of U. S. Grant (New York: C. L. Webster & Co.) we take this account of the raid: The course Sheridan took was directly to Richmond. Before night Stuart, commanding the Confederate cavalry, came on to the rear of his command. But the advance kept on, crossed the North Anna, and at Beaver Dam, a station on the Virginia Central Railroad, recaptured four hundred Union prisoners on their way to Richmond, destroyed the road, and used and destroyed a large amount of subsistence and medical stores. Stuart, seeing that our c
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Union cavalry in the Hood campaign. (search)
alled upon to give up his horses, and did so without a murmur. It was a busy time for the division, brigade, and regimental commanders as well as for the cavalry corps staff. Every man and officer did his best. A. J. Alexander, chief-of-staff; E. B. Beaumont, the adjutant-general; L. M. Hosea, the mustering officer; E. B. Carling, the quartermaster; J. C. Read, the commissary of subsistence; Bowman, Green, and H. E. Noyes, the inspectors; J. N. Andrews, W. W. Van Antwerp, G. H. Kneeland, Webster, and Pool, the aides-de-camp,--all officers of rare experience and intelligence,--threw themselves into the work and kept it up night and day till it was completed. Clothing was drawn for the men, the horses were shod, extra shoes were fitted, and every horse in the corrals or hospitals fit for service, or that could be found in the country, cities, towns, and villages, was taken and issued to the troopers, who were now flocking in from all quarters. In just seven days the effective force
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sigel in the Shenandoah Valley in 1864. (search)
ssible, and then turn toward Lynchburg or await further orders. Crook had been summoned to Grant's headquarters about a week before, where this raid had been discussed and decided upon. In another letter I was directed to have a large train ready and to move up the Valley and meet the expedition of Ord and Crook as soon as it should reach Staunton. The most energetic measures were immediately taken to put this plan into operation. All the troops that could be spared were concentrated at Webster and Clarksburg to move to Beverly as soon as the necessary material should be collected at that point. But continuous rains had made the roads so bad that it was almost impossible to move even empty wagons to Beverly, and only about 6500 troops could be assembled for the expedition, unless the whole region from Harper's Ferry and Martinsburg to Cumberland and Parkersburg were to be left unprotected and exposed to hostile enterprises. Of all these circumstances General Grant was informed,
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