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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 4: editorial Experiments.—1826-1828. (search)
d reminiscences of the deceased statesmen, and copious extracts from the eulogies pronounced by Webster, Cushing, and Peleg Sprague; but the editor, while paying tribute to the abilities, virtues, any, at the Exchange 1827. Coffee House, to nominate a Representative to Congress to succeed Mr. Webster, who had just been promoted to the Senate, he attended it. The slate had already been arrang vindication of the great Federal leader, and that he should be chosen to the seat vacated by Mr. Webster. He accordingly wrote a carefully studied speech advocating his nomination, which he attemptodesty took the liberty to designate a candidate for member of Congress, to take the place of Mr. Webster. It is very true that the gentleman he named stands high in the estimation of the public, anw American System; and one correspondent even took him to task for publishing an extract from Mr. Webster's speech on internal improvements. The Philanthropist, like the Free Press, reported the Sta
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 6: the genius of Universal emancipation.1829-30. (search)
ation, however remote and gradual, would have met with in such a body; and this was more than two years before the organized anti-slavery movement began. Less germane to the purpose of the Genius was the nullification debate between Hayne and Webster in the Senate; but Garrison could not resist printing those portions of Webster's famous reply which have become classic in American political and patriotic oratory. To the various moral and philanthropic questions in which he felt deep interesWebster's famous reply which have become classic in American political and patriotic oratory. To the various moral and philanthropic questions in which he felt deep interest,—temperance, peace, the treatment of the Indians, imprisonment for debt, and the discountenancing of lotteries,—he made frequent reference. He found two temperance addresses which had been sent him for notice too cold, too didactic, too speculative, to create a stirring sensation in the reader, or to rouse a slumbering community to a just apprehension of its danger, and he defined his own method of dealing with the subject: We, who are somewhat impetuous in our disposition, and G. U.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 7: Baltimore jail, and After.—1830. (search)
his message, must communicate to persons of prominent influence what he had learned of the sad condition of the enslaved, and the institutions and spirit of the slaveholders; trusting that all true and good men would discharge the obligation pressing upon them to espouse the cause of the poor, the oppressed, the down-trodden. He read to me letters he had addressed to Dr. Channing, Dr. Beecher, Dr. Edwards, W. E. Channing, Lyman Beecher, Justin Edwards. the Hon. Jeremiah Mason, and Hon. Daniel Webster, holding up to their view the tremendous iniquity of the land, and begging them, ere it should be too late, to interpose their great power in the Church and State to save our country from the terrible calamities which the sin of slavery was bringing upon us. These letters were eloquent, solemn, impressive. I wonder they did not produce a greater effect. It was because none to whom he appealed, in public or private, would espouse the cause, that Mr. Garrison found himself left and i
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 9: organization: New-England Anti-slavery Society.—Thoughts on colonization.—1832. (search)
ur admission to equal rights imperative. Be your rallying cry— Union and our Country! By Union he, of course, meant harmonious action among the colored people themselves; not that Union, and less and less every day that Constitution, for which Webster went as they were I go for the Constitution as it is, and for the Union as it is (Second speech on Foot's Resolution, Jan. 26, 1830).—slave representation and all—saying: It is the original bargain, the compact; let it stand. At the close of tis in the highest degree criminal for you to continue the present compact. Let the pillars thereof fall—let the superstructure crumble into dust— if it must be upheld by robbery and oppression. The domestic slavery of the Southern States, Mr. Webster had said in the speech already cited, I leave where I find it,—in the hands of their own governments. It is their affair, not mine. Quite otherwise Mr. Garrison, in the first number of the volume, reaffirming the guilt of slaveholders o
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 14: the Boston mob (first stage).—1835. (search)
5.130. meeting in the same Faneuil Hall that had been denied the abolitionists, and urged that Webster, Otis, Adams, Story, Sprague, Austin, Choate, and Everett should vindicate the fair fame of oure the temerity to answer that their construction of the Constitution is the same with that of Mr. Webster Webster, Choate and Everett were conspicuously absent from the Faneuil Hall meeting (Lib. Webster, Choate and Everett were conspicuously absent from the Faneuil Hall meeting (Lib. 5.142). and other jurists: that they aim at abolition only with the consent of the slaveholding States. Then, why don't they go South to present their appeals? To send them through the mails and ot); and as early as 1830, Henry Clay, to guard against the treachery of the post-office, advised Webster to address him under cover, and proposed to do the same in return (Webster's Private CorrespondWebster's Private Correspondence, 1.505). Neither the future Judge Sprague nor his brother lawyer, neither Mayor Otis declaiming nor Mayor Lyman presiding, and all paving the way for riot in the streets of Boston, bethought th
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, A Glossary of Important Contributors to American Literature (search)
, Conn., April 24, 1750. Graduating from Yale in 1767, he became tutor there and then studied law. His published works include The progress of Dulness (1772-74) ; an Elegy on the times (1774); his famous McFingal, a modern Epic poem (1774-82). He was associated with the Hartford wits in the production of The Anarchiad (1786-87), and was judge of the superior court from 1801 until 1819. The poetical works of John Trumbull were published in 1820. Died in Detroit, Mich., May 10, 1831. Webster, Daniel Born in Salisbury (now Franklin), N. H., Jan. 18, 1782. Graduating from Dartmouth in 1801, he studied law, was admitted to the bar, and was unsurpassed as a lawyer and orator. He became U. S. representative from New Hampshire and later from Massachusetts, and in 1827 was made U. S. Senator from the latter state. Some of the best known of his public orations are those on the Bunker Hill monument, on the Pilgrim anniversary, and the eulogium on Jefferson and Adams. His most celebra
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, chapter 13 (search)
Duyckinck's Cyclopedia of American literature, 2 vols., Charles Scribner, 1855. E. C. Stedman and E. M. Hutchinson's Library of American literature, 11 vols., Webster & Co., 1887-90. E. C. Stedman's American Anthology, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1900. Ii. Special authorities and references Chapter 1: the Puritan writersTicknor's Life of William Hickling Prescott, Ticknor & Reed, 1863. Mrs. J. T. Fields's Life of Harriet Beecher Stowe, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1897. (B) Webster's Works, 6 vols., Little & Brown, 1851. Channing's Works, 1 vol., American Unitarian Association, 1886. Prescott's History of the conquest of Mexico, 3 volsia and Oregon Trail. 1849. George Ticknor's History of Spanish literature. 1849. Whittier's Voices of freedom. 1850. Hawthorne's Scarlet letter. 1850. Webster's Seventh of March Speech. 1851. Mrs. Stowe's Uncle Tom's cabin. 1853. Curtis's Potiphar papers. 1854. Thoreau's Walden. 1855. Whitman's Leaves of gr
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Index. (search)
sm, 110, 154. Vanished, Emily Dickinson's, 264. Van Wart, Henry, 89. Verplanck, Gulian C., 81. Vining, Miss, 80. Vision of Sir Launfal, Lowell's, 164. Voices of the night, Longfellow's, 142. Walden, Thoreau's, 191. Wallace, Horace Binney, 72. Wallace, Lew, 129. Walpole, Horace, 45, 49. Ward, Artemus, 243. Warner, Charles Dudley, 88, 124. Warville, Brissot de, 52. Washington, 51, 63, 94, 117, 221. Wasson, David A., 264. Waverley novels, Scott's, 93, 274. Webster, Daniel, 43, 110, 111, 112-114. Webster, Hannah, 92. Webster, John, 258. Webster, Noah, 82. Week on the Concord and Merrimack rivers, Thoreau's, 191, 195. Welby, Mrs. Amelia B., 210. Wellington, Duke of, 123. Wendell, Barrett, 18, 109, 161. Wheeler, Charles Stearns, 261. When Lilacs last in the Dooryard Bloomed, Whitman's, 232. Whipple, Edwin Percy, 124, 125. White, Blanco, 263. White, Maria, 161. Whitman, Walt, 220, 221, 223, 227-234, 264. Whittier, Elizabeth, 240. Whitt
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
the, 197 Warfield, Mrs., 305 War-Lyrics, 278 War lyrics and Songs of the South, 299 Warner, Susan, 398 War poetry of the South, 300 Warren, James, 105 Warren, Mercy, Otis, 104, 105 Washington, Booker T., 323-325, 326, 351 Washington, George, 116, 117, 118, 181, 182, 260 Wasp, the, 387 Watts, Isaac, 401 Way down upon the Suwanee River, 353 Way to Arcady, the, 243 Wayland, Francis, 219 Webb, Charles Henry, 242 Webb, James Watson, 183 Weber, 353 Webster, Daniel, 50, 51, 71, 85, 86, 87, 88, 92-103, 135, 164, 207 Webster, Noah, 180, 396 Weekly register, 188 Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers, a, 3, 4, 5, 9, 12 Weems, Parson, 104, 105 Wells, H. G., 394 Wendell, Evert Jansen, 225 Wentworth, Gov., Benning, 114 Western monthly magazine, the, 169 Western monthly review, the, 169 Western review and miscellaneous magazine, the, 169 Westminster review, the, 137, 140 West Point, 156 What was it?, 373, 374 Wheaton,
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters, Chapter 5: the Knickerbocker group (search)
erett commemorated the career of the two Revolutionary leaders, and on the following day a greater than Everett, Daniel Webster, pronounced the famous eulogy in Faneuil Hall. Never were the thoughts and emotions of a whole country more adequately s, since the Declaration of Independence, than would have been done in five centuries of continued colonial subjection? Webster asserted in his peroration: It cannot be denied, but by those who would dispute against the sun, that with America, and ificance of the vast changes that had come over American life since 1776? The external changes were familiar enough to Webster's auditors: the opening of seemingly illimitable territory through the Louisiana Purchase, the development of roads, canndon was eagerly reading Irving's Sketch book. In 1821 came Fenimore Cooper's Spy and Bryant's Poems, and by 1826, when Webster was announcing in his rolling orotund that Adams and Jefferson were no more, the London and Paris booksellers were cover
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