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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: Franklin (search)
e and imported from abroad, he becomes in Philadelphia almost as good a Queen Anne's man as Swift or Defoe. His scientific investigations bring him into correspondence with fellow-workers in England, France, Germany, Italy, Holland, and Spain. Entering upon public life, he is forced into co-operation or conflict with the leading politicians, diplomats, and statesmen of Europe. In his native land he has known men like Cotton Mather, Whitefield, Benjamin Rush, Benjamin West, Ezra Stiles, Noah Webster, Jay, Adams, Jefferson, and Washington. In England, where his affections strike such deep root that he considers establishing there his permanent abode, he is in relationship, more or less intimate, with Mandeville, Paine, Priestley, Price, Adam Smith, Robertson, Hume, Joseph Banks, Bishop Watson, Bishop Shipley, Lord Kames, Lord Shelburne, Lord Howe, Burke, and Chatham. Among Frenchmen he numbers on his list of admiring friends Vergennes, Lafayette, Mirabeau, Turgot, Quesnay, La Rochef
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 8: American political writing, 1760-1789 (search)
on, in his Letters of Fabius. The opposing views of the Anti-federalists were vigorously set forth by Agrippa, whose eighteen letters are probably to be ascribed to James Winthrop of Massachusetts; by George Clinton of New York, who published seven letters under the name of Cato; by Robert Yates, in two letters of Sydney; and in seven letters by Luther Martin. All the foregoing are reprinted in P. L. Ford, Essays on the Constitution. The pamphlet literature was equally important. Noah Webster, best known to later generations as a lexicographer, came to the support of the new instrument in An examination into the leading principles of the Federal Constitution; as did John Jay, in An address to the people of the state of New York; Pelatiah Webster of Philadelphia, in The weakness of Brutus exposed, a reply to the first of a series of sixteen essays ascribed to Thomas Treadwell of New York; Tench Coxe, in An examination of the Constitution, written over the pseudonym of An Americ
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: early essayists (search)
70, and between 1785 and 1800 nearly a hundred series of light periodical essays were contributed to various New England journals. Ellis. H. M., Joseph Dennie and his circle, p. 51. Those of the better sort like the Neighbour of The Massachusetts spy or the Metabasist in The Farmer's journal of Danbury, Connecticut, when not discussing politics, filled their columns with grave moralizing or racy satire on manners. They were widely copied and recopied by other papers, and a few such as Noah Webster's Prompter and Mrs. Judith Murray's Gleaner attained the distinction of separate publication by reason either of their plain common sense or their studied correctness. In general, the imitation of English models resulted in feeble literary replicas, or in strange patchworks of Yankee homespun with Addisonian finery. During the first decade of the nineteenth century nearly every literary device and favourite character in the long line of British essayists was reproduced in this country
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: fiction I — Brown, Cooper. (search)
snuff-box. In November, 1804, he married Miss Elizabeth Linn of New York, and was thereafter an exemplary husband, father, and drudge, who produced pamphlets, large parts of his magazine, and practically the whole of the useful American Register (1807-11). The fame of his novels, of which he claimed to think little, became a legend, but new editions were not called for. In 1809 he was elected to honorary membership in the New York Historical Society, with such notables as Lindley Murray, Noah Webster, Benjamin Trumbull, Timothy Dwight, Josiah Quincy, and George Clinton. He died of consumption 19 February, 1810. In England he was well known for at least a generation. Blackwood's praised him with the fiery pen of John Neal; Scott borrowed from him the names of two characters in Guy Mannering; Godwin himself owed to Wieland a hint for Mandeville. In his native country Brown has stood, with occasional flickerings of interest, firmly fixed as a literary ancestor. There is little to n
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
n. Wars of New England with the Eastern Indians, 25 Washington, 91, 139, 140, 141, 144, 46, 168, 190, 195, 198, 202, 225, 226, 245, 258, 295 Washington and the Theatre, 216 n. Watch-tower, 18 Water-Witch, the, 300 Watson, Bishop, 91 Watteau, 111 Watts, Isaac, 70 n., 159, 160 Way of the Congregational churches Cleared, the, 37 Wayne, Anthony, 203 Ways of the hour, the, 305 Weakness of Brutus exposed, the, 148 Webb, George, 161 Webster, Daniel, 250 Webster, Noah, 91, 148, 233, 292, 354 Webster, Pelatiah, 148 Wedderburn, Lord, 99 Weekly magazine, the, 288, 290 Weems, M. L., 315 Welby, Adlard, 207 Weld, Isaac, 189, 202, 206 Welde, Thomas, 156 Wells, Richard, 136 Wemyss, F. C., 221 n., 223 n. Wept of wish-ton-wish, the, 300 West, Benjamin, 91 Westchester Farmer, 136, 137 Western Clearings, 318 Weston, Richard, 190 When Lilacs last in the Dooryard Bloomed, 270 When was the drama introduced in America? 216 n. Whipp
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To the same. (search)
vidence ready to be proved by three witnesses, the pro-slavery lawyers did not pretend to deny that the intent was to carry the child back into slavery built they took the new and extraordinary ground that Southern masters had a legal right to hold human beings as slaves while they were visiting here in New England. Judge Wild expressed a wish to consult with the other judges; and our abolition friends, finding the case turn on such a very important point, resolved to retain the services of Webster, for want of a better man. He was willing to serve provided they would wait a few days. Rufus Choate, a man only second to him in abilities, and whose heart is strongly favorable to anti-slavery, was em ployed. The expectations thus excited that Mr. Choate would become an opponent of slavery were doomed to disappointment; during the latter years of his life he was utterly hostile to the anti-slavery movement. The opposite counsel were full of sophistry and eloquence. One of them reall
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Mrs. S. B. Shaw. (search)
, and his great admiration of Daniel Webster, led him to do what pained his heart at the time and troubled his conscience afterward. But you would rarely find a man who would atone so nobly for an error. Now that the war is over, and slavery is abolished, I think his reason for enjoining secresy no longer exists. When I urged upon him that the moral influence of the action might do good, he did not renew his prohibition. In a recent letter to me he expresses great satisfaction that he has been enabled to take an active part in the struggle that has resulted in the emancipation of the slaves. How I wish that your darling Robert had survived to look back upon the Revolution as a thing completed, and to glory in his share of it! Yet perhaps it would not have been better so. I am glad it is proposed to erect a statue to him in Boston; but I hope they will not place it in the vicinity of Daniel Webster. If Webster had done his duty, there would have been no storming of Fort Wagner.
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Standard and popular Library books, selected from the catalogue of Houghton, Mifflin and Co. (search)
Thomas Bailey Aldrich. Story of a Bad Boy. Illustrated. 16mo, $r.50. Marjorie Daw and Other People. 16mo, $1.50. Prudence Palfrey. 16mo, $1.50. The Queen of Sheba. 16mo, $1.50. The Stillwater Tragedy. $1.50. Cloth of Gold and Other Poems. 16mo, $r.50. Flower and Thorn. Later poems. 16mo, $1.25. Poems. Complete. Illustrated. 8vo, $5.00. American Men of Letters. Edited by Charles Dudley Warner. Washington Irving. By Charles Dudley Warner. 16mo, $1.25. Noah Webster. By Horace E. Scudder. 16mo, $1.25. Henry D. Thoreau. By Frank B. Sanborn. 16mo, $1.25. George Ripley. By 0. B. Frothingham. 16mo, $1.25. J. Fenimore Cooper. By Prof. T. R. Lounsbury. (In Preparation.) Nathaniel Hawthorne. By James Russell Lowell. N. P. Willis. By Thomas Bailey Aldrich. William Gilmore Simms. By George W. Cable. Benjamin Franklin. By T. W. Higginson. Others to be announced. American statesmen. Edited by John T. Morse, Jr. John Quin
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 4: the New York period (search)
anck and William C. Bryant the poet. This passage, probably by Mr. Verplanck, gives a glimpse at the semi-official society of the city in those days. Cedar street, since that day, has declined from its ancient consequence. I had the pleasure of seeing Mr. Jefferson in an old two-story house in that street, unbending himself in the society of the learned and polite from the labors of the bureau. And there was Talleyrand, whom I used to meet at the houses of General Hamilton and of Noah Webster, with his club-foot and passionless immovable countenance, sarcastic and malicious even in his intercourse with children. He was disposed to amuse himself with gallantry too; but who does not know, or rather, who ever did know Talleyrand?--About the same time I met with Priestley — grave and placid in his manners, with a slight difficulty of utterance — dry, polite, learned and instructive in his conversation. At a period somewhat later, I saw here the deputy Billaud de Marennes, who ha
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 5: the New England period — Preliminary (search)
terary centre which in some sense rivaled New York may be set, perhaps, at the year (1830) when Webster and Channing were at the height of their reputation; when Webster's Reply to Hayne was delivereWebster's Reply to Hayne was delivered, and Channing was just entering upon that career of social and political reform which gave him both American and European fame. Boston was then a little city of some sixty thousand inhabitants, stercargo to Rio Janeiro or Canton. This was, externally speaking, the Boston of Channing and of Webster. The fact has been already noted that in America, as in Greece and Rome, the first really nariginal thought, or of inspired feeling. He had not even the charm of simplicity, though, like Webster, and unlike the other of the great trio of New England orators, Rufus Choate, he strove in late structure built upon a large scale cannot always be condemned for lack of saliency in detail. Webster's oratory, like his physique, was impressive from its massiveness, not from its subtlety. Mor
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