hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 86 38 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 50 2 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 41 7 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 40 20 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 36 10 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 31 1 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 27 3 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 24 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. 14 10 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 6 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary. You can also browse the collection for Webster or search for Webster in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 3 document sections:

J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 3 (search)
d a nice discrimination of details. As a politician he attaches the utmost importance to consistency — and here I differ with him. I think that to be consistent as a politician, is to change with the circumstances of the case. When Calhoun and Webster first met in Congress, the first advocated a protective tariff and the last opposed it. This was told me by Mr. Webster himself, in 1842, when he was Secretary of State; and it was confirmed by Mr. Calhoun in 1844, then Secretary of State himselMr. Webster himself, in 1842, when he was Secretary of State; and it was confirmed by Mr. Calhoun in 1844, then Secretary of State himself. Statesmen are the physicians of the public weal; and what doctor hesitates to vary his remedies with the new phases of disease? When the President had completed the reading of my papers, and during the perusal I observed him make several emphatic nods, he asked me what I wanted. I told him I wanted employment with my pen, perhaps only temporary employment. I thought the correspondence of the Secretary of War would increase in volume, and another assistant besides Major Tyler would be
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 10 (search)
ns of such high standing, without the clearest evidence of guilt. Mr. Custis had signed the ordinance of secession, and that ought to be sufficient evidence of his loyalty. December 9 Gen. Winder informed me to-day that he had been ordered to release Mr. Custis; and I learned that the Secretary of War had transmitted orders to Gen. Huger to permit him to pass over the bay. December 10 Nothing new. December 11 Several of Gen. Winder's detectives came to me with a man named Webster, who, it appears, has been going between Richmond and Baltimore, conveying letters, money, etc. I refused him a passport. He said he could get it from the Secretary himself, but that it was sometimes difficult in gaining access to him. I told him to get it, then; I would give him none. December 12 More of Gen. Winder's men came with a Mr. Stone, whom they knew and vouched for, and who wanted a passport merely to Norfolk. I asked if it was not his design to go farther. They said yes
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XIII. April, 1862 (search)
s Gen. Sydney Johnston. Dibble, the traitor. enemy at Fredericksburg. they say we will be subdued by the 15th of June. Lee rapidly concentrating at Richmond. Webster, the spy, hung. April 1 Gen. Sydney Johnston having fallen in battle, the command in the West devolved on Gen. Beauregard, whose recent defense at Island Noor at least prevent more injury to it, from the wicked facility hitherto enjoyed by spies to leave the country. April 10 The condemned spies have implicated Webster, the letter-carrier, who has had so many passports. He will hang, probably. Gen. Winder himself, and his policemen, wrote home by him. I don't believe him any mmeful that martial law should be playing such fantastic tricks before high heaven, when the enemy's guns are booming within hearing of the capital? April 24 Webster has been tried, condemned, and hung. April 25 Gen. Wise, through the influence of Gen. Lee, who is a Christian gentleman as well as a consummate general, ha