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ide those left in camp for want of arms. He further says: Our total loss, in killed, wounded, and missing, amounts to 1.235--that of the enemy will probably reach 3,000. Beyond doubt, the Rebel army was considerably larger than ours — probably about two to one. It embodied not only the mass of the Missouri Rebels under Gen. Price, as well as those of Arkansas under McCulloch, but a considerable force, also, from Texas, with one regiment from Louisiana. Among its losses were Col. Weightman, commanding a brigade of Missourians, while Gens. Slack and Clark were severely, and Gen. Price slightly wounded. Yet the preponderance of losses was undoubtedly on our side; that of Lyon alone being a national disaster. Pollard, in his Southern History, says: The death of Gen. Lyon was a serious loss to the Federals in Missouri. He was an able and dangerous man — a man of the times, who appreciated the force of audacity and quick decision in a revolutionary war. To military edu
ration of President Lincoln at, 421-2; the dark days at, 470. Washington Star, The, citation from, 329. Waul, T. N., beaten for Congress, 339. Wayne, Judge, of Ga., on Dred Scott, 259. Webster, Daniel, 78; his reply to Hayne, 86-7; 101; speech at Niblo's Garden, 152 to 154; 155; 192; 202; speech at Abingdon, 199; 205-6; 207; on the Fugitive Slave Law. 220-21; 223; 260-271: letter from Channing to, 353; 370; speech at Buffalo, 404; 511. Weed, Thurlow, editorial by, 360-61. Weightman, Col., killed at Wilson's Creek, 582. Weston, Mo., a man tarred and feathered at, 239. Weston Reporter, The, (Mo.,) citation from, 238. Westport, Mo., Border Ruffian resolves at, 239. Wentz, Lieut.-Col., killed at Belmont, 597. Wesley, John, 32; 70; 255; 501. West Virginia, 479; 480; population in 1860, 480; refuses to secede, etc., 518; Pierpont chosen Governor of, 519; Letcher's Message, 519; Federal troops enter the State; Porterfield's Address, 521; battle of Philippi
till further west and north of the road. On the east of Wilson's creek, upon a corresponding plateau, were Hebert's and McIntosh's regiments, McRae's battalion, Weightman's Missouri brigade, and Woodruff's and Reid's Arkansas batteries and Bledsoe's Missouri. battery, overlooking the valley in which Price lay. General Rains had a, Gratiot's, Dockery's and Walker's—more than ,700 strong, had not fired a shot, nor had Graves' Missouri regiment, about 300 strong, that ought to have followed Weightman into battle. There they lay, just across the creek, not half a mile away, with nothing to do and doing nothing. Price galloped over to Gratiot during the pausering down the line and officers and men would quickly spring forward to obey it. One of his aides, Colonel Allen of Saline, was killed while receiving an order. Weightman and Cawthorn and his adjutant were mortally wounded; Slack was fearfully lacerated by a musket ball, and Clark shot in the leg. Col. Ben Brown was killed. Chur
The city of Washington. The Washington correspondent of the New York Herald says that Gen. Scott, Mayor Herbet and Gen. Weightman, the Major General of the District militia, have been in consultation in regard to the defence of Washington. The whole matter ought to be left to the authorities of the District. There is no intention anywhere, unless it be by Wide Awakes, to invade Washington. If any military precautions are necessary, they might safely be entrusted to the regular Chief of the District militia, have been in consultation in regard to the defence of Washington. The whole matter ought to be left to the authorities of the District. There is no intention anywhere, unless it be by Wide Awakes, to invade Washington. If any military precautions are necessary, they might safely be entrusted to the regular Chief of the militias, .Gen. Weightman, a tried and gallant officer of the war of 1812, and a gentleman universally respected and beloved in the Federal metropolis.
Gen. Weightman and Capt. Schaeffer. Our attention has been called to the following in the Baltimore Sun: "A Military Commission Refused-- Suspected 'Loyalty.'--It appears from a correspondence between General Weightman and Capt. Francis B. Schaeffer, both of Washington, that a commission as Major of the Seventh Regiment of the District of Columbia militia has been refused the latter, is 'loyalty' was doubted. --From the correspondence we learn that at an interview had with General Weightman, in compliance with his request, Captain Schaeffer was informed that his commission was ree above statements, we are happy to learn, are entirely erroneous. The conversation between Gen. Weightman and Capt. Schaeffer, we have authority for stating, was as follows: Capt. Schaeffer was not my? To this he answered in the negative. We are happy to do justice in this respect to Gen. Weightman, a native of Virginia, an officer of the war of 1812, and as true a gentleman in all public
Municipal election in Boston. Boston, Dec. 10. --Weightman, the Union candidate for Mayor, is probably elected over Kimball, Republican. [Second Dispatch.] Boston. Dec. 10. --The vote for Mayor is as follows. Weightman, 8,768; Kimball, 5,681.--The Unionists have a large majority in the Councils. Municipal election in Boston. Boston, Dec. 10. --Weightman, the Union candidate for Mayor, is probably elected over Kimball, Republican. [Second Dispatch.] Boston. Dec. 10. --The vote for Mayor is as follows. Weightman, 8,768; Kimball, 5,681.--The Unionists have a large majority in the Councils.
Death of Major Weightman. We are deeply pained to see among the list of the fallen in the late battle in Missouri, the name of Major. Richard Hanson Weight-man of the Missouri volunteers. Major Weightman had distinguished himself greatly in the Mexican war, as com- of the flying artillery in General Hoffman's expeditioMajor Weightman had distinguished himself greatly in the Mexican war, as com- of the flying artillery in General Hoffman's expedition and, at the battle of , unlimbered fifty yards nearer the enemy than any battery at Palo Alto or Re Probably the most extraordinary march ever made is on this continent, unless the pretext war has furnished a parallel, was made brilliant, energetic and heroic . The reign of a distinguished Maryland family, where blood has flowed like water in every war of America from the Revolutionary war. Major Weightman has nobly its reputation by a life of the most toned chivalry and by a soldier's death. We never knew a man who bore in his per- more unmistakable insignia of Nature's noblemen. His was a face that might have suggested those beautiful a Virginia
battery around his person. The Missouri troops at the North the Louisiana troops at the Southeast and South and General Weightman's brigade of Missouri forces at the Southwest, including his fine battery of artillery — having been victorious at Price was slightly wounded also, but not disabled. He continued to lead his wing on to victory most gallantly. Gen. Weightman now his column in on the right of my regiment, in Gen. Slack's division, where he fell mortally wounded, near Tottecript, adds. We have lost a great number of our officers I will name some of them; Gen. Slack, severely wounded; Gen. Weightman, killed; Lt. Col. Aussin, of Col. R. A. Rives' regiment, killed; Colonel B. J. Brown, of Ray killed; Capt. Blackwood,s rays acting upon these, must have soon rendered the atmosphere unendurable. Among the Confederates killed is Colonel Weightman, formerly delegate in Congress from New Mexico, Gen. Parsons was wounded very severely, and it is believed mortally
ions. Capt. Ried's battery did nobly; it disabled a battery of the enemy, but unfortunately it hit Capt. Hinson, of the Louisiana regiment, and killed him. This was the only unfortunate occurrence of the day. The attack by Capt. Woodruff upon Totten's battery is briefly but emphatically described: Woodruff tackled Totten and "lifted him clear cut of the water," and his track was marked by dead Dutch, as thick as pumpkins on bottom land. A gallant man fell of the Missourians, Col. Weightman, who said that morning before the battle, that he intended to redeem the character of Missouri, or lose his life. The Missourians fought well — all fought well. Nothing but blue hen's chickens could have won the fight, after the surprise and loss of position. Gen. Pearce led the 34 regiment, and part of the 5th to McCulloch's aid, and saved the day. After the fight, McCulloch said, "Pearce, you saved me and the battle; they had me down, you brought me the 34 and 5th and saved me."
the South with a personal bitterness more profound and rancorous even than that of Gen. Scott The illegitimate son of Mrs. Pryor, of Richmond, by a French fiddler, cannot be expected to bear much love to a section familiar with the antecedents of his illustrious house and himself. Fremont's brutal Provost Marshal in St. Louis, Col. Justus McKinstry who, we observe, has been lately promoted to a Brigadier Generalship, is, if possible, a greater poltroon than Fremont. When the late Gen. Weightman who fell gallantly fighting at the recent battle in Missouri, was a young Cadet at West Point, a rencontre occurred between him and a big bully of a senior class, this same McKinstry in which the latter received a most humiliating lesson, one of the scars of which on his face, he is likely to carry to his grave. A few years ago, a Kentucky gentleman, who met McKinstry in the West, was informed by this doughty warrior that he received the scar in the Mexican war! This incident sufficien