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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 9: the last review. (search)
he heights of Round Top; O'Rorke, of the 140th New York, pressing to that glorious defense, swiftly called from the head of his regiment to serener heights; Jeffords, of the 4th Michigan, thrust through by bayonets as he snatched back his lost colors from the deadly reapers of the wheat-field; Rice, of the 44th New York, crimsoning the harrowed crests at Spottsylvania with his life-blood,his intense soul snatched far otherwhere than his last earthly thought-Turn my face towards the enemy! ; Welch, of the 16th Michigan, first on the ramparts at Peebles' Farm, shouting On, boys, and over! and receiving from on high the same order for his own daring spirit; Prescott, of the 32d Massachusetts, who lay touching feet with me after mortal Petersburg of June 18th, under the midnight requiem of the somber pines,--I doomed of all to go, and bidding him stay,--but the weird winds were calling otherwise; Winthrop, of the 12th Regulars, before Five Forks just risen from a guest-seat at my homely
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Index. (search)
70. Trowbridge, C. T., Lt.-Col., 65, 94,115, 168, 169, 172, 174, 175, 182, 237,243, 247, 258, 261, 265, 269, 270, 272, 274, 276, 286,292, 294, 9, 62, Trowbridge, J. A., Lt., 271. Tubman, Harriet, 11. 272. Twichell, J. F., Lt.-Col. 117, 122. ,270. Vendross, Robert, Corp., 265. 28. Walker, G. D., Capt., 270. Walker, William, Sergt., 280, 289. Washington, William, 21. 271. Watson, Lt., 100. Webster, Daniel, IHon., 1. 16, 34, Weld, S. M., 225. 1, 64, West, H. C., Lt., 271. 226, West, J. B., Lt., 271. 8 273, White, E. P., Lt., 271. White, N, S., Capt., 270, 271, 272. Whiting, William, Hon., 282, 284,288, 290. Whitney, H. A., Maj., 176, 230, 269, 270. Wiggins, Cyrus, 266. Williams, Harry Sergt., 230. , 277, Williams, Col., 277. Wilson, Henry, Hon., 281, 284, 285. Wilson family, 246. Wood, H., Lt., 271, 272. Wood, W. J., Maj. 280. Wright, Gen., 98, 104. Wright, Fanny, 247. Zachos, Dr., 18. the end. Cambridge: Electrotyped and Printed by Welch, Bigelow, & Co.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 17: events in and near the National Capital. (search)
ridges, and 5,000 muskets from Illinois. Indiana, 5,000 muskets and 200,000 cartridges, with caps. Illinois, 200,000 cartridges. Massachusetts, 4,000 stand of arms. New Hampshire, 2,000 muskets and 20,000 cartridges. Vermont, 800 rifles. New Jersey, 2,880 muskets with ammunition. In addition to these, he ordered the issue of 10.000 muskets and 400,000 cartridges to General Patterson, then in command in Pennsylvania; 16,000 muskets to General Sandford, of New York, and forty rifles to General Welch. In reply to Governor Yates, of Illinois, asking for five thousand muskets and a complement of ammunition, he directed him to send a judicious officer, with four or five companies, to take possession of the Arsenal at St. Louis, which he believed to be in danger of seizure by the secessionists of Missouri. He also telegraphed to Frank P. Blair, of St. Louis (afterward a major-general in the National Army), to assist in the matter. By judicious management, twenty-one thousand stand of s
cquired by many previous years of faithful and distinguished military service. I desire also especially to mention Brig.-Gen. Elliott, Surgeon McParlin, Col. Beckwith, Lieut.-Col. T. C. H. Smith, Capt. Piper, Chief of Artillery, Capt. Merriett of the Engineers, and Lieut. Shunk, Chief of Ordnance. I must also honorably mention the following members of my staff, the conduct of all of whom met my hearty approval and merits high commendation: Cols. Macomb, Clary, Marshall, Butler, Morgan, and Welch; Majors Selfridge and Meline; Captains Archer, Douglas Pope, Haight, Atcheson, De Kay, Piatt, Paine, Strother. Mr. McCain, confidential telegraph operator at my headquarters, accompanied me throughout the campaign, and was at all times eminently useful and efficient. My personal escort, consisting of two small companies of the First Ohio cavalry, numbering about one hundred men, performed more arduous service probably than any troops in the campaign. As orderlies, messengers, and guards t
cquired by many previous years of faithful and distinguished military service. I desire also especially to mention Brig.-Gen. Elliott, Surgeon McParlin, Col. Beckwith, Lieut.-Col. T. C. H. Smith, Capt. Piper, Chief of Artillery, Capt. Merriett of the Engineers, and Lieut. Shunk, Chief of Ordnance. I must also honorably mention the following members of my staff, the conduct of all of whom met my hearty approval and merits high commendation: Cols. Macomb, Clary, Marshall, Butler, Morgan, and Welch; Majors Selfridge and Meline; Captains Archer, Douglas Pope, Haight, Atcheson, De Kay, Piatt, Paine, Strother. Mr. McCain, confidential telegraph operator at my headquarters, accompanied me throughout the campaign, and was at all times eminently useful and efficient. My personal escort, consisting of two small companies of the First Ohio cavalry, numbering about one hundred men, performed more arduous service probably than any troops in the campaign. As orderlies, messengers, and guards t
s, whooping and yelling in their usual style, and firing with great rapidity. The Renville Guards, under Lieutenant Gaman, were sent by me to check them, and Major Welch of the Third regiment, was instantly in line with his command, with his skirmishers in the advance, by whom the savages were gallantly met, and after a conflictIndians--repulsed at all points with great loss — retired with great precipitation. I regret to state that many casualties occurred on our side. The gallant Major Welch was badly wounded in the leg, and Captain Wilson, of the Sixth regiment, was severely bruised by a nearly spent ball in the shoulder. Four of our men were kill lesson received by them today will make them very cautious for the future. I have already adverted to the courage and skill of Lieut.-Colonel Marshall, and Majors Welch and Bradley, to which I beg leave to add those of the officers and men under their respective commands. Lieut.-Colonel Averill and Major McLaren were equally
th brigade Missouri State militia, to march to Newtonia. The fire continuing, I ordered the Sixth Kansas volunteers, cavalry, and the Third Indian home guard to proceed to the battle-field in a trot, while I marched with the infantry and artillery in the same direction. Our train was left in charge of some four hundred Indians and two pieces of Major Blair's battery. At about ten A. M., the messenger to Col. Hall overtook me on the road, with the message hereto annexed. I despatched Capt. Welch, Second Ohio volunteer cavalry, to keep communication between us open. Soon afterward I received the news that our troops, in the attempt to take the town, were defeated, and the infantry cut up. Official reports I have not been able to obtain yet. On my arrival at the battle-field, I found the Fourth Kansas, and the Third Indian home guards in line of battle on an elevation north of Newtonia. I ordered the Sixth Kansas, with two mountain howitzers to the right; the Third Indian re
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Summer campaign of 1863-report of General W. E. Jones. (search)
ed to pass long after the balls were whistling in their midst. Some sixty or seventy of Colonel Farrabee's men had got up and were doing their duty well. The enemy, driven to desperation, resorted to a charge of cavalry that swept everything before it. The led horses, wagons, straggling infantry and camp followers were hurled down the mountain in one confused mass. Ineffectual efforts were made for a rally and resistance but without avail until at the foot of the mountain a few joined Captain Welch's company of the Maryland cavalry, stationed at this point, and drove back the advance of the enemy. But this mere handful of men had to yield to the increasing numbers of the enemy. My staff and all my couriers having got separated from me and the enemy having the road in my front, I made through the fields and byways for Williamsport to escape or be useful as occasion might require. Arriving early in the morning all was found in confusion. Every one was anxious to cross the river —
thers, shall hope to contest, through this generation if need be, the feasibility of the transfer. William R. Williams, N. Y. Rufus Babcock, Jr., N. J. E. E. Cummings, N. H. J. Hyatt Smith, Pa. Samuel Baker, N. Y. S. B. Swain, Mass. Rev. Dr. Welch supposed it was intended to adopt the report without debate. He would, however, ask the privilege of speaking a few words on the question before the meeting. With all his heart he subscribed to the sentiment expressed in the preamble and relette suggested that the words social meetings should be inserted, instead of private prayer meetings, which was accepted by the Committee, when the amendment was withdrawn. Hon. Wm. D. Murphy moved the recommittal of the report. Lost. Rev. Dr. Welch--I protest with my whole soul against the adoption of the report. It will put our denomination in a position of shameful absurdity before the world. On motion, it was resolved that a copy of the resolutions be presented to the President o
en the piratical craft seized the opportunity to emerge from the harbor by the north channel and sailed northward, in order to elude observation. Her movements were noticed on board the frigate, but as there were many little craft continually plying about the entrance to the port, she did not attract particular attention. On Monday, the 3d of May, the pirate fell in with the brig Joseph, of Rockland, Me., with a cargo of sugar, from Cardenas, Cuba, bound to Philadelphia, and consigned to Welch & Co. On seeing the Joseph, she set an American ensign in her main rigging, which is understood to be a signal to speak, for latitude and longitude, or any other purpose. When the Joseph had come within speaking distance, the commander of the pirate ordered the captain to lower his boat and come on board of the schooner. As soon as the captain had come on board, he was told that his vessel was a prize under authority of the Confederate States of America, his vessel being fitted out by auth
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