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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Colleges for women. (search)
es and seminaries authorized to confer degrees, having 2,441 professors and instructors, 20,548 students and $3,236,416 in total income. The institutions exclusively for women, organized on the general basis of college requirements, were divided into two classes. The first comprised the following: Mills College, in Mills College Station, Cal.; Rockford College, Rockford, Ill.; Women's College, Baltimore, Md.; Radcliffe, in Cambridge; Smith, in Northampton; Mount Holyoke, in South Hadley; Wellesley, in Wellesley—all in Massachusetts; Wells, in Aurora; Elmira, in Elmira: Barnard, in New York City; and Vassar, in Poughkeepsie—all in New York; Bryn Mawr, Bryn Mawr, Pa.; and Randolph-Macon Women's College, Lynchburg, Va. These colleges had 543 professors and instructors, 4,606 students, seventeen fellowships, 254 scholarships, $6,390,398 invested in grounds and buildings, $4,122,473 invested in productive funds, and $1,244,350 in total income. The second division, which comprised insti
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sanborn, Franklin Benjamin 1831- (search)
Sanborn, Franklin Benjamin 1831- Author; born in Hampton Falls, N. H., Dec. 15, 1831; graduated at Harvard College in 1855; lectured at Cornell, Smith, Wellesley, and the Concord School of Philosophy; an active member of the Massachusetts State board of charities; editor of the Boston commonwealth, Springfield Republican, and Journal of social Science in 1876-97, and author of Life of Thoreau; Life and letters of John Brown, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Massachusetts (search)
ves and $1,500,000 worth of property lost......May 16, 1874 Prohibitory liquor law repealed......April 5, 1875 Centennial celebration of the battles of Lexington and Concord......April 19, 1875 Centennial celebration of the battle of Bunker Hill......June 17, 1875 Celebration of the 100th anniversary of the day Washington assumed command of the army, at Cambridge......July 3, 1875 Smith College at Northampton, chartered 1871, opened......September, 1875 Wellesley College, Wellesley, chartered 1870, opened......1875 Vice-President Henry Wilson dies suddenly at Washington......Nov. 22, 1875 Public address in Faneuil Hall, Boston, by Dennis Kearney, the sand-lot orator of San Francisco, Cal.......Aug. 5, 1878 Act abolishing nine separate State boards, and creating the board of health, charity, and lunacy, passed by legislature, which adjourns......April 30, 1879 French ocean cable landed at North Eastham, Cape Cod.......Nov. 15, 1879 Cape Cod ship-canal f
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865, Roster of the Fifty-Fourth Massachusetts Infantry. (search)
, Pa. 21 Mch 63; missing Jly 18 63 Ft. Wagner. $50. Johnson, William 29, mar.; farmer; Montrose, Pa. 21 Mch 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Ithaca, N. Y. Jones, Joseph 19, sin.; farmer; Coatesville, Pa. 21 Mch 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Kelly, William D. Corpl. 19, sin.; laborer; New Bedford. 16 Apl 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Leavenworth, Kan. Lawrence, Robert 28, sin.; laborer; New Bedford. 25 Feb 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Lee, George H. Sergt. 21, sin.; hostler; New Bedford. 26 Feb 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Wellesley. Leighton, Samuel 41, mar.; laborer; New Bedford. 19 Feb 63; 20 Aug 65. Wounded 18 Jly 63 FtWagner. $50. Lewis, George F. 28, mar.; laborer; Cambridgeport. 9 Mch 65; 24 Dec 63 Portsmouth Grove, R. I.; dis. Wounded 18 Jly 63 Ft. Wagner. $50. Lott, John 18, ——; barbel; ——. 12 May 63; died of wounds 30 Mch 64. Gen. Hos. Davids Id. N. Y. Wounded 18 Jly 63 Ft. Wagner. $50. Magill, Benjamin. 30, sin.; farmer; Grove, Pa. 16 Jly 63; died 15 Oct 64 Regtl. Hos. Morris Id. S. C. of p
Washington, Camden, New Orleans, Cleveland, Mobile, Toronto, Shreveport, Helena, Birmingham, Racine, La Crosse, Mc-Keesport, etc. A partial list of places in Massachusetts includes: Cambridge, Newton, Brookline, Woburn, Natick, Hyde Park, Dedham, Needham, Wakefield, Malden, Arlington, Belmont, Walpole, Lexington, Gloucester, Marlboro, Weymouth, North Adams, Maynard, Mansfield, Randolph, Foxboro, Cohasset, Lenox, Chelsea, Brockton, Franklin, Provincetown, Canton, Stoughton, Braintree, and Wellesley. These engines are also in use in foreign water-works, as for instance at St. Petersburg, Honolulu, and Sydney. The new United States Navy is practically fitted out with Blake pumps, a partial list including the following vessels: Columbia, New York, Iowa, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, Newark, Chicago, Boston, Atlanta, Massachusetts, Indiana, Maine, Puritan, Miantonomoh, Monadnock, Terror, Amphitrite, Katahdin, Detroit, Montgomery, Marblehead, Yorktown, Dolphin, Machias, Castine, Petrel, Ves
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men, chapter 20 (search)
men; They are the higher grade of teachers in the high-schools, academies, and colleges of our Western States. They are as well trained, intellectually, for the most part, as their sisters of the Eastern States, have quite as often had the advantages of foreign travel; and derive from the life of newer communities, and from the more varied material under their charge a certain breadth of view and freedom from tradition which are rarer at the East. The Eastern colleges, and conspicuously Wellesley, draw much of their supply of teachers from this class, who thus give back to the East that benefit of culture which was formerly supposed to flow westward. Thus much for my authority; the passage in the letter that most strikes me is this; We have in school a lovely girl from the country. She is rustic, shy, lovely, and dainty. She reminds me of what Ruskin says somewhere, that perhaps the time will come when we shall say, He has beautiful manners; he is really quite rustic. I dare
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 15: the Circuits.—Visits in England and Scotland.—August to October, 1838.—age, 27. (search)
o stay longer, and cordially invited there whenever I could come, on this visit or any future visit to England. You know that this bishop is the venerable Dr. Maltby, the friend of Parr, so renowned in Greek. Chantrey, the sculptor, once killed two woodcocks at one shot at Holkham. Old Coke was so delighted that he vowed a monument on the spot to be made by Chantrey himself; and all the classical world were invited to offer epigrams in Greek,— or, at least, all came forward. Alderson, Wellesley, Brougham, Maltby, &c. contributed; and the venerable bishop told me that Brougham was writing his while he was Lord Chancellor; and, on writing a line, used to send an express with it to his (Maltby's) house, to know if it was correct. The frequency and urgency of these messages from the Lord Chancellor excited the attention of Dr. M.'s neighbors, who thought that one of the archbishoprics was to be vacated, and that arrangements were making for the promotion of Dr. Maltby. The venerabl
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
attention to the woodcock story, of which I have already written you, and he told me that the epigram which I have sent you under his Lordship's name was written by the Bishop of Durham, and that it was the best of all offered. The Marquis of Wellesley wrote a Latin one, of which he has promised to give me a copy; it is not, however, lapidary, being too long. Brougham told me that his own Greek epigram was the worst of all. You will see an allusion to this story in a note in the last Quarteriams's Epigram on Napoleon, and told him that I thought it compared well with that on Themistocles in the Anthology. He said the latter was very fine; that he thought, however, there were others in the Anthology better, but that the Marquis of Wellesley was of a different opinion on this point, and that the Marquis was a much higher authority than himself on these matters. He then repeated to me Williams's lines on the Apollo, and took up his pen and wrote them down for me without referring t
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 16, 1839. (search)
e; but that it was very good. He told how he secured good steaks, by personally going into the kitchen and watching over his cook, to see that he did not spoil them by pepper and horse-radish,—the last being enough to make a man go mad. I called his attention to the woodcock story, of which I have already written you, and he told me that the epigram which I have sent you under his Lordship's name was written by the Bishop of Durham, and that it was the best of all offered. The Marquis of Wellesley wrote a Latin one, of which he has promised to give me a copy; it is not, however, lapidary, being too long. Brougham told me that his own Greek epigram was the worst of all. You will see an allusion to this story in a note in the last Quarterly Review, to which I first called Chantrey's attention. I have spoken of Courtenay as the great gastronomer; I shall not neglect to add that he is as good a scholar as epicure. When we were speaking of Greek epigrams, he and Brougham alternately
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 41: search for health.—journey to Europe.—continued disability.—1857-1858. (search)
ning House of Commons, when I heard Mr. Gladstone in an elaborate speech against the divorce bill; dined in the lobby of the House with Lord Ebrington. August 1. Went to Stoke Park to visit the Laboucheres. There were Mr. and Mrs. William Cooper and Lord and Lady Bagot. August 2. Sunday. Went to church in Gray's church; wandered about his churchyard; visited the monument of Lord Coke; in the afternoon drove to the chapel at Windsor, where was a choral service; called on the dean, Dr. Wellesley, who took us into the private grounds of the castle; drove by Eton back to Stoke, which we reached about eight o'clock. August 3. Returned to town; by appointment visited Lambeth, where I was shown over the palace by Rev. Mr. Thomas, the son-in-law of the Archbishop; attended House of Commons, where I heard Lord John Russell on the Jews again; dined with Mr. Adolphus, Adolphus and Ellis, the reporters, were each old friends of Sumner. Ante, vol. 1. p. 343; vol. II. pp. 64, 65, 37
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