hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 10 4 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 10 results in 3 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 9: (search)
e houses of the foreign ministers are open to me: the Nuncio, Prince Giustiniani, the French Ambassador Prince Montmorency de Laval, and the English, who is Sir Henry Wellesley, have shown me much kindness and civility. I therefore dine abroad nearly all the time; but as soon as I can speak Spanish tolerably I shall seek Spanish s it be late, I find a lover with his guitar before the house of his mistress, singing his passion and his suffering. Only last night I was coming home from Sir Henry Wellesley's, where I had stayed very late at a little ball Lady Wellesley gave in her garden,—a kind of fete champetre,—and, as I came into the street where I live, ILady Wellesley gave in her garden,—a kind of fete champetre,—and, as I came into the street where I live, I saw a man standing in the middle, and singing with a beautifully clear and sweet voice to his guitar, which he played with great skill. I stopped to hear him, and recognized a little popular song, called a seguidilla, of eight lines, which I have in a large collection of these pieces, taken from the very lips of the populace th
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 10: (search)
ersation and agreeable intercourse was the foreign and diplomatic, which had its stated rendezvous and amusements, five evenings every week, and afforded a refuge on the others. On Sunday evening there was always a quiet, sober party at Sir Henry Wellesley's. He himself is a man of not more than common talents, but of sound judgment, and altogether a respectable English gentleman. The chief secretary of the legation, Mr. Vaughan, is a Fellow of Oxford, about five-and-thirty years old, whoputation well in her drawing-room; for her Wednesday-evening fete, beginning with a play and these beautiful magical exhibitions, and ending as it always did with a ball, was the most splendid one in the week. On Thursday evening, however, Lady Wellesley followed her,— hand passibus oequis, to be sure,—but still with a beautiful entertainment. She had the finest garden in Madrid, and trusting to the invariable climate of Castile, used to illuminate it fancifully, and receiving her company t
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 14: (search)
ed than he is; but in his general character, as he appears in mixed society, he is more a politician than anything else. . . . . I This anecdote was written out later by Mr. Ticknor, and added to the Journal. had much known in Madrid Sir Henry Wellesley, ambassador there, and afterwards, as Lord Cowley, ambassador at Paris. He gave me important letters of introduction, and wrote besides to London, desiring me to be presented to his venerable mother. One morning, therefore, the Dowager Mr, not much infirm for her age, and with the air of a person accustomed to deference from her kinsfolk, however elevated, as well as from other people. She received me kindly, and we talked, as a matter of course, about Madrid, Sir Henry and Lady Wellesley, Lord Marcus Hill, and other persons there whom she knew; as well as of some, like the Tatistcheffs, the Duc de Montmorency, etc., of whom she had only heard. My English was without accent, and, as I was presented at the request of her son,