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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune 10 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 2 0 Browse Search
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Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 10: (search)
r were in striking contrast with the blond hair and fair complexion of her chaperon, Lady Thornton. In contrast to them was the superb figure of Madame Catacazy, magnificently dressed and crowned with that beautiful head of hair for which she was so generally admired. The whole Diplomatic Corps, the judges of the Supreme Court, members of the Senate, the House, and many other official dignitaries were in attendance on this rare occasion. The press was represented by Horace Greeley, David A. Wells, Horace White, Samuel Bowles, Charles Nordhoff of the Herald, Sands, Minturn, Marshalls, Halstead, Samuel Read, Gobright, Benjamin Perley Poore, and John W. Forney. The usual number of senators and representatives were in attendance, also a large contingent of the army and navy. A few evenings later Hon. Zachary Chandler, of Michigan, who occupied one of the most beautiful homes in Washington, on H Street between Fourteenth and Fifteenth, gave a very large reception to the commissio
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune, Chapter 9: Greeley's presidential campaign-his death (search)
rates imposed during the war, if less will raise the necessary revenue. A bill prepared by David A. Wells, Special Commissioner of the Revenue, in 1867, reducing duties on raw material, had passed tto $7 a ton, it increased the duty on steel rails, nickel, flax, and marble. The removal of Mr. Wells from his office was accepted as an affront both to tariff reform and to civil service reform. tical politician was shown by the publication, on April 25, of a letter addressed by him to David A. Wells, in which he said: I do not want the nomination, and could only be induced to considerelegates was very strong, and they were quoted as saying, after the publication of his letter to Wells, that Grant would carry their State against Adams by 50,000 majority. As events proved, this feeld, at the invitation of Carl Schurz, J. D. Cox, William Cullen Bryant, Oswald Ottendorfer, David A. Wells, and J. Brinkerhoff, at the Fifth Avenue Hotel, in New York, on June 20, and William S. Groe
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
on for civil service reform—the intellectuals. The pioneer was David A. Wells, See Book III, Chap. XXIV. chairman of the Revenue Commissid it could not be a patriot. It is not surprising, therefore, that Wells was accused of sympathy for the lost cause of the Confederacy, evenff issue by book and pamphlet, as well as by speech and editorial. Wells, in his Relation of tariff to wages, pointed out that higher wages but no Kipling dramatizes fully the incidents of school life and no Wells makes the novel the instrument of educational reform. The nearest he older school who had grown up amid the former conditions. David A. Wells (1828-98) was a chemist who had sprung into prominence by a pamic changes (1890), and The Theory and practice of taxation (1900). Wells had a remarkable faculty for marshalling economic facts and exerted York; West & Richardson, Cummings & Hilliard, R. P. & C. Williams, Wells & Lilly, and S. T. Armstrong, of Boston; Beers & Howe, of New Haven
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
13, 414, 434 Ways and means of payment, 436 Wealth of Nations, 431 Wealth vs. Commonwealth, 358 We are seven, 292 Webbe, John, 426 Weber, 467 Webster, Daniel, 101, 337, 346, 347 Webster, Noah, 21, 400, 401, 418, 446, 470, 475, 475-478, 479, 541, 546, 548, 557, 558, 563, 566 Webster, Pelatiah, 429 Weeping willow, the, 512 Weevilly Wheat, 516 Weitling, Wilhelm, 344 Welb, 589 Welcker, 461, 462 We'll all go down to Rowser's, 516 Welles, Gideon, 351 Wells, David A., 354, 355, 439, 440 Wells, H. G., 419 Wendell, Barrett, 417, 423 We're marching Round the Levy, 516 Werther, 453 Wesley, 500 West, Max, 359 West, Rebecca, 99 Westcott, Edward Noyes, 95 Western America including California and Oregon, 136 Western literary magazine and Institute of instruction, 404 Western Wilds, 143 Weston, George M., 344 Westward Ho! 55 Westward movement, the, 187 Westways, 90 Wet days at Edgewood, 111 Weyl, Walter, 365 Weyman, Sta
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 57: attempts to reconcile the President and the senator.—ineligibility of the President for a second term.—the Civil-rights Bill.—sale of arms to France.—the liberal Republican party: Horace Greeley its candidate adopted by the Democrats.—Sumner's reserve.—his relations with Republican friends and his colleague.—speech against the President.—support of Greeley.—last journey to Europe.—a meeting with Motley.—a night with John Bright.—the President's re-election.—1871-1872. (search)
eople, whose solid Republican column at the South it was important to break. Accordingly, for six weeks before the meeting of the convention its promoters plied the senator with appeals for a public statement of his position, which were so near in date and so alike in substance as to suggest concert among the writers. Among them were Whitelaw Reid of the New York Tribune, Horace White of the Chicago Tribune, Samuel Bowles of the Springfield Republican, Francis W. Bird, Edward Atkinson, David A. Wells, Hiram Barney, George Wilkes, and J. R. Doolittle; and they were reinforced by others who joined in a similar pressure at Washington. They set forth with great urgency the necessity of his taking a stand openly in order to save the new movement at its birth; and they added the personal appeal that one of its inspirations was the indignation felt at the outrage inflicted on him by the President and his partisans in his removal from his committee. Mr. Reid wrote with much concern, March