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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 8 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 4 0 Browse Search
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 26, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 22, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 3, 1860., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, chapter 4 (search)
Yankees were in Putnam County, only twelve miles off. It is absurd for people to fly into a panic over every wild rumor that gets afloat, but I was glad the courier came, for three o'clock was the hour appointed for us to start, and I was sleeping so soundly that I am sure I would never have waked in time but for him. The moon had just risen as we moved out of Sparta, and I walked with Fred in the pleasant night air till day began to dawn. We tried to get breakfast at Culver's, and again at Whaley's, the only public houses on the way, but were refused at both places, so we had to satisfy ourselves with the recollection of Mrs. Harris's good supper and a crust of stale bread that I found in Arch's basket. We reached Mayfield about nine and had to wait an hour for the cars to start. Mrs. Hammond had got there before us. She said that she could find no shelter the night before, and had to sleep out under the trees with her little children. She is a sensible woman, and didn't seem dis
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 132 (search)
1864: On the morning of the 2d of May the regiment, together with detachments of non-veterans from the Tenth and Fourteenth Michigan Infantry, in all about 850 effective men, and under command of Col. R. F. Smith, marched with the brigade, commanded by Brig. Gen. James D. Morgan, from Rossville, Ga., to Ringgold, Ga., arriving at 2 p. m.; distance marched, twelve miles. May 3 and 4, remained in camp at Ringgold, nothing of importance transpiring, except the falling of a tree, killing Private Whaley, Tenth Michigan Infantry. May 5, in obedience to orders, the regiment moved at sunrise, passed through Hooker's Gap, drove back the enemy's outposts, and encamped in a fine open field about three miles from former camp. May 6, remained in camp through the day; three days rations issued to the regiment this p. m., and orders to march at sunrise to-morrow. May 7, at sunrise marched in the direction of Tunnel Hill; the advance of the division encountered considerable opposition, but the e
devoted by the House to the consideration of disputed claims to seats — there being rival claimants from Oregon, from Nebraska, and from the Ist district of Pennsylvania, beside three members in all from Virginia, whereof two (Messrs. Carlile and Whaley) were chosen from Western districts, by heavy votes, on the regular day of election; while the other (Mr. Upton) was chosen under different auspices. The Convention which passed the Ordinance of Secession had assumed power to annul or suspend th had treated this action of the Convention as a nullity, not having been ratified by a popular vote, as the law calling the Convention required; and had elected in its despite. Congress approved and sustained this action, and Messrs. Carlile and Whaley held their seats with very little dissent. There was more demur as to Mr. Upton's case-his poll being light, the time and manner of his election irregular, and he having voted in Ohio the preceding November; but he was not unseated. The remaini
York — A. W. Clark, Freeman Clark, Davis, Frank, Ganson, Griswold, Herrick, Hotchkiss, Hulburd, Kellogg, Little-john, Marvin, Miller, Morris, Nelson, Odell, Pomeroy, Radford, Steele, Van Valkenburg. New Jersey--Starr. Pennsylvania--Baily, Broomall, Coffroth, Hale, Kelley, McAllister, Moorhead, A. Myers, L. Myers, C. O'Neill, Schofield, Stevens, Thayer, Tracy, Williams. Delaware--Smithers. Maryland--Cresswell, Henry Winter Davis, F. Thomas, Webster. West Virginia--Blair, Brown, Whaley. Kentucky--Anderson, Randall, Smith, Yeaman. Ohio — Ashley, Eckley, Garfield, Hutchins, Schenck, Spaulding. Indiana--Colfax, Dumont, Julian, Orth. Illinois--Arnold, Farnsworth, Ingersoll, Norton, E. B. Washburne. Missouri--Blow, Boyd, King, Knox, Loan, McClurg, J. S. Rollins. Michigan--A. C. Baldwin, Beaman, Driggs, F. W. Kellogg, Longyear, Upson. Iowa — Allison, Grinnell, A. W. Hubbard, Kasson, Price, Wilson. Wisconsin--Cobb, McIndoe, Sloan, Wheeler. Minnesota--Do<
e captain killed and buried at Ceredo. The captain of the Rockbridge Rangers was mortally wounded, and in a dying condition on Tuesday night. On leaving Guyandotte, Col. Jenkins remarked to a reliable citizen there, We did not make much by coming; the losses are about equal! He made the same remark again in the hearing of Col. Whaley, before he escaped. Henry Clay Pate, of Kansas notoriety, was there as a captain, and it was he and his men that captured Col. Whaley.--Ironton Register. e captain killed and buried at Ceredo. The captain of the Rockbridge Rangers was mortally wounded, and in a dying condition on Tuesday night. On leaving Guyandotte, Col. Jenkins remarked to a reliable citizen there, We did not make much by coming; the losses are about equal! He made the same remark again in the hearing of Col. Whaley, before he escaped. Henry Clay Pate, of Kansas notoriety, was there as a captain, and it was he and his men that captured Col. Whaley.--Ironton Register.
Freeman's Ford to relieve General Trimble's brigade. On my arrival in the afternoon, I found the enemy had crossed over the river, and were in the immediate front of General Trimble. The Texas brigade being placed on the right, and Colonel Law's on the left, the attack was at once made, General Trimble leading off in the centre. The enemy were driven precipitately over the Rappahannock with considerable loss, not less, I think, than from two to three hundred. During the engagement, Major Whaley, Fifth Texas, fell, gallantly discharging his duties. The next night the command marched to Waterloo Ford, and relieved General A. P. Hill's division. From this point, having joined the main body of General Longstreet's forces, the march was continued in the direction of Manassas. On arriving at Thoroughfare Gap, the enemy were drawn up in line to dispute our passage. After a spirited little engagement with them by General D. R. Jones's troops, on the evening of the twenty-eighth inst
and two Lieutenants. The loss in the brigade was forty-four killed on the field, forty-three missing (most of whom are known to be, and the others are supposed to be, in the hands of the enemy), and four hundred wounded. Among the killed I regret to mention Captain Parks, Sixteenth Tennessee regiment; Lieutenant Hainey, Murray's battalion, attached to the Thirty-eighth Tennessee regiment; Lieutenant Wade and Color-bearer Bland, of the Fifty-first and Fifty-second Tennessee regiments; Captain Whaley and Lieutenant Craig, of the Twenty-eighth Tennessee regiment, and Lieutenant Van Vleck, Carnes' battery. Among the wounded were Colonels John H. Anderson and D. M. Donnell; Lieutenant-Colonel J. G. Hall, and Major T. G. Randle; Captains Puryear, Callum, and Bonds, and Lieutenants Cunningham, Leonard, Flynn, and Shaw, Eighth Tennessee regiment; Lieutenants Potter, Owen, and Worthington, Sixteenth Tennessee regiment; Captain McDonald, and Lieutenants Apple, Dauley, and Taylor, Twenty-eig
ng in the forcible abrogation of the old charter. In this struggle, Cambridge men were active participants. It is related by Hutchinson, under date of 1660, that, in the ship which arrived from London the 27th of July there came passengers Col. Whaley and Col. Goffe, two of the late King's judges. . . . . They did not attempt to conceal their persons or characters when they arrived at Boston, but immediately went to the governor, Mr. Endicot, who received them very courteously. They were vrhaps their acquaintance with Captain Gookin may have induced them to reside here. In a Narrative of the Commissioners from England about New England, published by Hutchinson in his Collection of Papers, Pages 419, 420. it is alleged that Col. Whaley and Goffe were entertained by the magistrates with great solemnity and feasted in every place, after they were told they were traytors and ought to be apprehended; they made their abode at Cambridge untill they were furnished with horses and
eside here. Westwood, William, in 1635 resided on the S. W. corner of Holyoke and Winthrop streets; and was one of the first Board of Selectmen, called Townsmen, 1634-5. He rem. to Hartford, where he was Selectman, and several times Deputy to the General Court. He subsequently rem. to Hadley, where he d. 9 Ap. 1669. He left no son, and only one daughter Sarah, who m. Aaron Cook, an emigrant from Dorchester, and had a son, Westwood Cook. Rev. Samuel Cook of Menot. was a descendant. Whaley, George, by w. Katherine, had Thomas, b. 14 Nov. 1650; George, b. 19 Ap. 1653. Whitcomb, Job (otherwise written Whetcomb), by w. Mary, had Jemima, b. 30 Mar. 1678. He was prob. s. of John of Lancaster, driven thence at the destruction of that town, and finally rem. to Weathersfield, Conn., where he d. 1683, leaving w. Mary and chil. Job, John, Mary, and Jemima. White, John, one of the first company, res. on the northerly side of Bow Street; he sold his estate 20 Oct. 1635 to Nichola
eside here. Westwood, William, in 1635 resided on the S. W. corner of Holyoke and Winthrop streets; and was one of the first Board of Selectmen, called Townsmen, 1634-5. He rem. to Hartford, where he was Selectman, and several times Deputy to the General Court. He subsequently rem. to Hadley, where he d. 9 Ap. 1669. He left no son, and only one daughter Sarah, who m. Aaron Cook, an emigrant from Dorchester, and had a son, Westwood Cook. Rev. Samuel Cook of Menot. was a descendant. Whaley, George, by w. Katherine, had Thomas, b. 14 Nov. 1650; George, b. 19 Ap. 1653. Whitcomb, Job (otherwise written Whetcomb), by w. Mary, had Jemima, b. 30 Mar. 1678. He was prob. s. of John of Lancaster, driven thence at the destruction of that town, and finally rem. to Weathersfield, Conn., where he d. 1683, leaving w. Mary and chil. Job, John, Mary, and Jemima. White, John, one of the first company, res. on the northerly side of Bow Street; he sold his estate 20 Oct. 1635 to Nichola
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