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The Daily Dispatch: October 11, 1861., [Electronic resource], Down the Rio Grande — the trip from Mesilla to Brownsville. (search)
ake report to the Court. Preceedings have been instituted in the Confederace States District Court at Richmond, for the sequestration of property belonging to alien enemies, amounting in value to over six hundred thousand dollars. To the list of parties representing this property, already published, we add the names of Jas. S. Woods and John Lowry, former partners of George W. Farant; Isaac M. Wolff and Henry Stern, former partners of Gave Elkers and Simon Elkers, and Geo. Carr and Joel N. Wheeler, agents for Commodore Uriah P. vy. Admiralty Proceedings. Hollins, Schooner Margaret, in Admiralty.--The Marshal made a report of the sale of the id Schooner Margaret, her tackle, apparel, furniture and cargo, pursuant to the vendi issued in this case, to which there is no exception, and which is confirmed by the Court, and the said Marshal paid into the registry of this Court the sum of $697.97, the t proceeds arising from the said sale; and it is ordered that the Clerk d
ence to be pronounced hereafter. Confederate States vs. John H. Gilmer, on a summons issued against the defendant, requiring him to appear and answer interrogatories. Answer filed in writing. Confederate States vs. George Carr and Joel N. Wheeler, on a petition to sequester the estate of Uriah P. Levy, an alien enemy. The defendant, Joel N. Wheeler, appeared by Wm. Green, his attorney, and filed in writing his answer, and claim to the petition and interrogatories filed by the Receivummons issued against the defendant, requiring him to appear and answer interrogatories. Answer filed in writing. Confederate States vs. George Carr and Joel N. Wheeler, on a petition to sequester the estate of Uriah P. Levy, an alien enemy. The defendant, Joel N. Wheeler, appeared by Wm. Green, his attorney, and filed in writing his answer, and claim to the petition and interrogatories filed by the Receiver. This write is to sequester the estate formerly owned by President Jefferson.
The Daily Dispatch: November 4, 1864., [Electronic resource], Stop the Runaways.--one thousand dollars reward. (search)
e operations, Sherman has been prevented, up to the present time, from receiving any communication with Atlanta. The correspondents with Hood's army agree that no general fight need be expected immediately, as Sherman is too far behind and has no transportation to march with rapidly. Very large supply trains have been passing up to Hood's army for the last fortnight. The enemy, under Kilpatrick, have made several desperate efforts to capture these trains, but, thus far, unavailingly. Wheeler is keeping them in check. A raid, however, is anticipated upon the Alabama and Tennessee railroad in the direction of Selma. Some of the Yankee garrisons recently captured in Northern Georgia were raw recruits, in camp of instruction, who had not yet had arms issued to them. From Mobile. In this quarter there is said to be considerable activity, though we are at a loss to know what it could be about, unless it be the extremely unhealthy state of that region at this season of
The Daily Dispatch: November 4, 1864., [Electronic resource], Stop the Runaways.--one thousand dollars reward. (search)
Receiver's sale of Monticello and Buck Island Estates, and other valuable property. --In pursuance of a degree of the District Court of the Confederate States of America for the Eastern District of Virginia pronounced on the 27th of September, 1864, in the case of the Confederate States against George Carr and Joel N. Wheeler, I shall sell, on the 17th day of November, at public auction, on the premises, for cash, in Confederate Treasury notes of the new issue, the following real and personal estate, late the property of Captain U. P. Levy, deceased, an alien enemy: 1. Monticello, a tract of two hundred and eighteen acres of land, in the county of Albemarle, in the State of Virginia, about two miles from the town of Charlottesville, with all the buildings therein, consisting of a large and commodious brick dwelling-house, with a variety of out-buildings, planned and built by Mr. Jefferson, who owned it and resided there at the time of his death. 2. Buck Island, a tra
Receiver's sale of Monticello and Buck Island Estates, and other Valuable property. --In pursuance of a decree of the District Court of the Confederate States of America for the Eastern District of Virginia pronounced on the 27th day of September, 1864, in the case of the Confederate States against George Carr and Joel N. Wheeler, I shall sell, on the 17TH day of November, at public auction, on the premises, for cash, in Confederate Treasury notes of the new issue, the following real and personal estate, late the property of Captain U. P. Levy, deceased, an alien enemy: 1. Monticello, a tract of two hundred and eighteen acres of land, in the county of Albemarle, in the State of Virginia, about two miles from the town of Charlottesville, with all the buildings thereon, consisting of a large and commodious brick dwelling-house, with a variety of out-buildings, planned and built by Mr. Jefferson, who owned it and resided there at the time of his death. 2. Buck Island, a
Receiver's Sale of Monticello and Buck Island Estates, and other Valuable property. --In pursuance of a decree of the District Court of the Confederate States of America for the Eastern District of Virginia pronounced on the 27th day of September, 1864, in the case of the Confederate States against George Carr and Joel N. Wheeler, I shall sell, on the 17th day of November, at public auction, on the premises, for cash, in Confederate Treasury notes of the new issue, the following real and personal estate, late the property of Captain U. P. Levy, deceased, an alien enemy: 1. Monticello, a tract of two hundred and eighteen acres of land, in the county of Albemarle, in the State of Virginia, about two miles from the town of Charlottesville, with all the buildings thereon, consisting of a large and commodious brick dwelling-house, with a variety of out-buildings, planned and built by Mr. Jefferson, who owned it and resided there at the time of his death. 2. Buck Island, a