hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 688 376 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 183 7 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 138 16 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 99 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 93 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 87 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 81 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 73 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 64 4 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 62 4 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Joseph Wheeler or search for Joseph Wheeler in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 4 document sections:

Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 8: the siege and capture of Fort Donelson. (search)
sed the cause of the conspirators. was built, had disappeared. The public buildings and most of the private ones had been laid in ashes during the war, and only a few dilapidated structures remained. At Cooley's tavern, near the landing-place (in which General Tilghman had quartered), the writer was introduced to Captain James P. Flood, the commander of the famous Flood's Second Illinois Battery, who performed gallant service at Dover, in repelling an attack by the cavalry of Forest and Wheeler. He had settled there as a lawyer, and was familiar with every foot of the battle-ground. He kindly offered to accompany the writer to the points of interest in connection with the battle, and took him to the house of G. M. Stewart, near the fort, an old and leading citizen of Stewart County, who had been faithful to the old flag, and had suffered much for its sake during the war. Mr. Stewart and his son (who had been in the Union service) kindly offered to go over the field of conflict w
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 15: the Army of the Potomac on the Virginia Peninsula. (search)
lly engaged in his flank movement. He had been dispatched by General Smith at an early hour, with about twenty-five hundred men, These consisted of parts of his own, and of Davidson's brigade, which was then under his command. Of his own brigade he chose for this duty the Fifth Wisconsin, Forty-ninth Pennsylvania, and Sixth Maine; and from Davidson's, the Seventh Maine and Thirty-ninth New York Volunteers. These were accompanied by Lieutenant Crowen's New York battery of six guns, and Wheeler's battery. to seize and hold an unoccupied redoubt at the extreme left of the Confederate position, which had been thrown up by Magruder, Site of the Dam. this is a sketch of the appearance of the site of the Dam when the writer visited the spot in June, 1866. it is from a rude bridge then recently thrown across the stream. The redoubt was on the high bank directly ever the little figure. Here the bank, as in many other places on the Peninsula, presented layers of perfect sea-shells
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 19: events in Kentucky and Northern Mississippi. (search)
at it is probable they lost more in the way of outfit, waste of horses and mules, and the necessary expenses, than they gained by this great plundering raid. The retreat was conducted by General Polk, and covered by the cavalry of the active General Wheeler. They fled into East Tennessee by way of Danville, Stanford, Crab Orchard, and Mount Vernon, followed by a large portion of Buell's army to Rock Castle River, in Rock Castle County. A division of Crittenden's corps was pushed on as far as motive than selfish calculation. that Buell was relieved of command, Oct. 30, 1862. and Major-General Rosecrans, who had won substantial victories in Mississippi, was put in his place. Then the designation of the Army of the Ohio, which Joseph Wheeler. Buell had commanded, was changed to that of the Army of the Cumberla d. We have said that Rosecrans had won substantial victories in Mississippi. Let us look at the record. When Halleck was called to Washington City, as we have o
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 20: events West of the Mississippi and in Middle Tennessee. (search)
h a heavy body of cavalry and mounted infantry, covering his right, and Forrest his left, while Wheeler was posted at Lavergne and Wharton at Nolensville. Bragg's right wing was commanded by E. Kirbater Nov. 27. he drove a Texan regiment fifteen miles down the Franklin pike. On the same day Wheeler was driven out of Lavergne by General E. N. Kirk, and wounded. Sheridan pushed the foe back ond shell. The battle of Hartsville was followed, two days later, Dec. 9, 1862. by a dash of Wheeler, with a heavy force of cavalry and mounted infantry, upon a National brigade Fifty-first Ohianley Matthews, guarding a forage train at Dobbins's Ferry, on Mill Creek. After a short fight Wheeler was repulsed, and Matthews took his train to camp unharmed. Three days after this, General Sta direction of Hardee. Bragg ordered the cavalry to fall back on the approach of the Nationals, Wheeler to form on the right and Wharton on the left, for the protection of the flanks of the line, and