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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 29 3 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 26 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, chapter 5 (search)
he enormous wealth of the world of knowledge, and the stupendous variety of that which I wished to know. Doubtless the modern elective system, or even a wise teacher, would have helped me; they would have compelled me to concentration, but perhaps I may have absolutely needed some such period of intellectual wild oats. This was in September, 1843. I read in that year, and a subsequent similar year, the most desultory and disconnected books, the larger the better: Newton's Principia and Whewell's Mechanical Euclid; Ritter's History of Ancient philosophy; Sismondi's Decline and fall of the Roman empire; Lamennais' Paroles d'un Croyant and Livre du Peuple; Homer and Hesiod; Linnaeus's Correspondence; Emerson over and over. Fortunately I kept up outdoor life also and learned the point where books and nature meet; learned that Chaucer belongs to spring, German romance to summer nights, Amadis de Gaul and the Morte d'arthur to the Christmas time; and found that books of natural histor
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, chapter 6 (search)
is time stayed out of the school for another year of freedom, returning only for the necessary final terms. There had just been a large accession of books at the college library, and from that and the Francis collection I had a full supply. I read Comte and Fourier, Strauss's Life of Jesus (a French translation), and bought by economy a fine folio copy of Cudworth's Intellectual system, on which I used to browse at all odd hours — keeping it open on a standing desk. I read Mill's Logic, Whewell's Inductive sciences, Landor's Gebir and Imaginary conversations. Maria Lowell lent me also Landor's Pentameron, a book with exquisite passages; Alford's poems, then new, and, as she said, valuable for their simplicity; and the fiery German lays of Hoffmann von Fallersleben, some of which I translated, as was also the case with poems from Ruckert and Freiligrath, besides making a beginning at a version of the Swedish epic Frithiof's Saga, which Longfellow admired, and of Fredrika Bremer's
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, Index. (search)
lpole, Horace, 280. Ward, G. C., 176. Ward, S. G., 176, 246. Ware, George, 25. Ware, Henry, 138. Ware, Thornton, 29. Ware family, the, 180. Washington, George, 16. Wasson, D. A., 112, 169. Watkins, W. I., 217. Watson, Marston, 78. Webb, Seth, 157. Webster, Daniel, 82, 136, 297. Webster, J. W., 27. Weiss, John, 103, 169. Weld, S. M., 78. Weller, Sam, 334. Wells, W. H., 129. Wells, William, 19, 20, 2x. Wendell, Barrett, 52. Wentworth, Amy, 8. Weyman, Stanley, 29. Whewell, William, 92, 101. Whipple, E. P., 170, 176. White, A. D. , 312. White, Blanco, 183. White, William, 126. White fugitive slaves, 146. Whitman, Walt, 230, 231, 289. Whittier, J. G., 8, 111, 128, 132, 133, 134, 135, 168, 171, 178, 179, 180, 185, 237. Whittier, Elizabeth, 133, 134. Wightman, Mayor, 244. Wilberforce, William, 327. Wilder, S. V. S., 10. Willis, Mr. 233. Willis, N. P., 95, 271. Wilson, Billy, 231. Wimpffen, General, 324 Wines, E. C., 310. Winkelried, Arnold, 154.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 22: divines and moralists, 1783-1860 (search)
y early Platonistic effusions of his, the symbol of a divine moral order, but is rather a machine grinding out uniform cycles under mechanical necessity, and making no answer to the human demand for purpose and freedom. These elements must be supplied from without; and it is a detached Deity who supplies them. The germ of this portion of Hopkins's system appears in one of his earliest published works, that entitled On the argument from nature for the divine existence (1833), a review of Whewell's Bridgewater Treatise on Astronomy and General physics considered with reference to natural theology. Here Hopkins already discredits the argument from design and finds evidence of the existence of God much less in nature than in man. Nature, though full of contrivance, is often irrational and neither wise nor good; only in man is there found a glimmering of wisdom and goodness, only there a moral valuation,— which must be the effect of a cause not different in kind, and hence of the Deit
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
, 12 Weems, Parson, 104, 105 Wells, H. G., 394 Wendell, Evert Jansen, 225 Wentworth, Gov., Benning, 114 Western monthly magazine, the, 169 Western monthly review, the, 169 Western review and miscellaneous magazine, the, 169 Westminster review, the, 137, 140 West Point, 156 What was it?, 373, 374 Wheaton, Henry, 71, 78 Wheeler, Joseph, 291 When evening Cometh on, 331 When Lilacs Last in the Door-yard Bloomed, 286 When this Cruel War is over, 285, 309 Whewell, Wm., 221 Whistling Dick's Christmas Stocking, 393-394 Whitcher, Frances Miriam, 154 White, Gilbert, 201 White, Maria (Mrs. J. R. Lowell), 246 White, Richard Grant, 253, 299, 303 White, William, 206 White Heron, a, 383 Whitman, George, 269, 271 Whitman, Jeff, 263 Whitman, Walter, Sr., 259 Whitman, Walt, 218, 245, 258-274, 276, 277, 284, 286, 303 Whitman, Sarah Helen, 60, 61 Whitney, Mrs. A. D. T., 398 Whittier, John, 45 Whittier, John Greenleaf, 42-54, 165, 16
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
several times to dine with him,—once in company with Professor Whewell,—and expressed his regard by other attentions. Sumne fell asleep. At the same dinner last week, I met Hallam, Whewell, Babbage, Lyell, Sir Charles Lyell, 1797-1875. Murchiso I then go to Cambridge, where my first day is engaged to Whewell, &c. A few days ago I received a most friendly and affectithe only guest here,—during the last four we have had Professor Whewell,—so that I can describe to you what was simply the fa university, and visited the various colleges. Dined with Whewell, William Whewell, D. D., 1795-1866; master of Trinity CWilliam Whewell, D. D., 1795-1866; master of Trinity College, and author of scientific works. and met a large company; next day dined in hall at Trinity, and then repaired to theius; By the invitation of A. Thurtell. breakfasted with Whewell, Henslow, and Peacock. George Peacock, 1790-1858; Profeton without giving you my Christmas Day. In the forenoon, Whewell and I went to the Minster at Peterborough, where the chur
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, December 5. (search)
Stuart Mill, 1806-1873. McCulloch, John Ramsay McCulloch, 1789-1864; author of the Dictionary of Commerce and Commercial Navigation. Spring Rice, Lord Lansdowne, &c. On the next day I commence my pilgrimage to Oxford, where I pass four days, and those four are engaged: first, to Sir Charles Vaughan, at All Souls; second, to my friend Ingham, M. P., at Oriel; third, to Dr. Hampden, at Christ Church; fourth, to Wortley, at Merton. I then go to Cambridge, where my first day is engaged to Whewell, &c. A few days ago I received a most friendly and affectionate letter from Lord Morpeth, in which he enclosed a letter of introduction to the Countess of Granville, Lady Granville (Henrietta Elizabeth) was the wife of Lord Granville, then English Ambassador at Paris. She and her sister, Georgiana, who was Lord Morpeth's mother, were the daughters of the fifth earl of Devonshire. Lord Granville died in 1846, and Lady Granville in 1862. His son is a distinguished statesman. now in Pari
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Athenaeum Club, Dec. 28, 1838. (search)
ry. He will probably write a book; if he does, he will show us no mercy. He says there is nobody in Congress worth any thing but Webster and Adams. Miss Martineau is diligently engaged on her novel, Dee<*>orook. which will be published in February or March. She has been exerting herself very much, and seems confident of no ordinary success. If she succeeds, she intends to follow it up by others. I left off my sketch at Milton without giving you my Christmas Day. In the forenoon, Whewell and I went to the Minster at Peterborough, where the church service is chanted. In the afternoon I read some of the manuscripts of Burke; after dinner, there were about thirty musicians who came from Peterborough, and in the hall alternately played and sang. Quite early the family retired; but Milton, in a distant wing of the house, had provided what he called a jollification on my account. What passed there I could easier tell than write. I got to bed before the cock crew. Hunting son
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
old man eloquent (I say eloquent indeed); and so the time passed. This morning I spent chatting with Hayward about law, literature, and society; then walked with Whewell, and afterwards dined with Bellenden Ker. H. Bellenden Ker was a conveyancer; was a friend of Lord Brougham, and passed the later years of his life at Cannes, e full of warm admiration of the author. Kind regards to Mrs. Greenleaf, and thanks for her letter. Ever affectionately yours, Charles Sumner. To Professor William Whewell, London. 2 Vigo Street, Jan. 23, 1839. dear Mr. Whewell,—I am so knocked up with a cold that I shall not venture to your dinner to-day. Give me my oMr. Whewell,—I am so knocked up with a cold that I shall not venture to your dinner to-day. Give me my own crystal weather, rather than your murky, foggy days,—freighted with colds, catarrhs, and death. I have caught three dismal colds in the space of six weeks; all which is a monition to me to run away, and get nearer to the sun. I shall, however, be in town when you return to wind up the Geological year, and hope to have the pleas<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 16, 1839. (search)
a Chancery barrister; then went to Rogers's, where was a small party, —Mrs. Marcet, Mrs. Austin, Miss Martineau, Mr. and Mrs. Lyell, Mr. and Mrs. Wedgewood, Harness, Rev. William Harness. and Milman. We talked and drank tea, and looked at the beautiful pictures, the original editions of Milton and Spenser, and listened to the old man eloquent (I say eloquent indeed); and so the time passed. This morning I spent chatting with Hayward about law, literature, and society; then walked with Whewell, and afterwards dined with Bellenden Ker. H. Bellenden Ker was a conveyancer; was a friend of Lord Brougham, and passed the later years of his life at Cannes, in France, where he died, about 1870. Sumner was his guest at dinner on different occasions, at 27 Park Road, Regent's Park. And the dinner! it is to be spoken of always. There was a small company: our host and his wife,—one of the most beautiful women I have ever seen; Courtenay, Philip Courtenay; Queen's counsel, belonging
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