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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 4 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 26, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 44: the lack of food and the prices in the Confederacy. (search)
ying the army was out of meat, and had but one day's rations of bread. March 18th. I saw adamantine candles sell at auction to-day (box) at $10 per pound; tallow, $6.50. Bacon brought $7.75 per pound by the 100 pounds. Flour selling in Columbus, Ga., 75 cents a pound, from wagons. Flour by the bushel, $5, meal $1, in 1864. March 25th.-Flour, $15 a barrel. March 2gth.-Great crowds are funding their Treasury notes to-day; but prices of provisions are not diminished. White beans, such as I paid $60 a bushel for early this month, are now held at $75. What shall we do to subsist until the next harvest? April 1, 1864.-Tea, $22; coffee, $12; brown sugar, $10; flour, $125 a barrel; milk, $4 a quart. Part of this diary is taken from the Diary of a Southern Refugee. The following prices are now paid in this city: boots, $200; coats, $350; pants, $100; shoes, $125; flour, $275 per barrel; meal, $60 to $80 per bushel; bacon, $9 per pound; no beef in mark
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 80: General Joseph E. Johnston and the Confederate treasure. (search)
ge, Secretary of War : There is required for payment of troops now on the march through Georgia, the sum of one hundred and eight thousand three hundred and twenty-two dollars and ninety cents ($T08,322.90), to be placed to the credit of Major E. C. White, Quartermaster. A. R. Lawton, Quartermaster-General. (Indorsed.) The Secretary of the Treasury will please issue as requested. John C. Breckinridge, Secretary of War. (Indorsed.) M. H. Clark, Acting Treasurer, will turn over to Major E. C. White the amount named within, preserving the necessary vouchers, warrant hereafter to be drawn when settlement can be regularly made. John H. Reagan, Acting Secretary of Treasury. (Indorsed.) Washington, Ga., May 4, 1865. Received of M. H. Clark, Acting Treasurer, C. S., the sum of one hundred and eight thousand three hundred and twenty-two dollars and ninety cents ($108,322.90) in specie, the amount called for by within paper. I obtained permission from General Br
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson in Lexington, Va. (search)
of the Army of Northern Virginia. As they stood thus, Major Jackson, mounted on an ordinary-looking horse, rode up. His face was as calm and unmoved as ever, the thin lips tightly compressed, and looking just as he looked at Kernstown and Manassas. Riding up to the side of an elderly-looking gentleman in clerical cloth, standing in front of the main entrance to the institute, Major Jackson wheeled his horse, and facing his battalion as he raised his cap, said, Let us pray. The venerable Dr. White, pastor of the Presbyterian church, then stepped forward, and baring his gray locks to the sun, poured forth a feeling prayer. It was a memorable scene! Just as the clergyman pronounced the Amen, Jackson wheeled his horse, and in a short, crisp manner, gave the command, Forward, march! Waving a silent adieu to the assembled crowd, he rode off at the head of the column. That was the last time his gaze ever fell upon the town of Lexington. His subsequent history is known to all. No he
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Summer campaign of 1863-report of General W. E. Jones. (search)
th, Seventh and Eleventh regiments of Virginia cavalry left Snickersville and joined Brigadier General Robertson at Berryville. The Twelfth Virginia cavalry having been sent to picket towards Harper's Ferry, was left on that duty. The 30th of June a part of this regiment under Lieutenants Harmon and Baylor surprised and captured a cavalry picket of the enemy on Bolivar Heights. They killed one and captured twenty-one, including two officers, with all their arms, horses, and equipments. White's battalion, which was detached at Brandy Station, has not been reporting its operations. The three remaining regiments of the brigade accompanied General Robertson by way of Williamsport and Chambersburg, arriving at Cashtown the 3rd of July. Near this point an order from General Lee required a force of cavalry to be sent at once to the vicinity of Fairfield to form a line to the right and rear of our line of battle. In the absence of General Robertson I determined to move my command a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The last days of the Confederate Treasury and what became of its specie. (search)
dge, Secretary of War: There is required for payment of troops now on the march through Georgia, the sum of one hundred and eight thousand three hundred and twenty-two dollars and ninety cents ($108,322.90), to be placed to the credit of Major E. C. White, Quartermaster. A. R. Lawton, Quartermaster-General. [Indorsed.] The Secretary of the Treasury will please issue as requested. John C. Breckinridge, Sec'y of War. [Indorsed.] M. H. Clark, Acting Treasurer, will turn over to MMajor E. C. White the mount named within, preserving the necessary vouchers, warrant hereafter to be drawn when settlement can be regularly made. John H. Reagan, Acting Sec'y Treasury. [Indorsed.] Washington, Ga., May 4, 1865. Received of M. H. Clark, Acting Treasurer, C. T., the sum of one hundred and eight thousand three hundred and twenty-two dollars and ninety cents ($108,322.90) in specie, the amount called for by within paper. My own transportation having gone forward, General Br
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Last letters and telegrams of the Confederacy—Correspondence of General John C. Breckinridge. (search)
C. R. B. [extract special order No.——.] Confederate States of America, War Department, 1 1/2 Miles west of Savannah Bridge, Georgia, May 3, 1865. Maj. E. C. White, Senior Q. M., will take charge of silver (in specie and bullion) belonging to the Government, and estimated at one hundred and eight thousand, three hundred anold, placed in his hands for the purpose, as above required for the distribution of the silver in specie. By command of the Sec'ty of War. (Signed) For Maj. White, Q. M. W. J. Davis, A. A. G. This is endorsed in the same hand as the previous paper, No. 8, and as follows: War Dep't C. S., May 3rd, 1865. Extract Special Order No. ——. (Copy.) Directs Maj. White, Q. M., to take charge of Gov't silver, and pay to troops, &c. A true copy—Wm. J. Davis, A. A. G. The signature confirms that this and other papers are correctly construed as Maj. D—'s handwriting. C. R. B. Greensboroa, 23 April. Gen'l J. C. Breckinridge,—Gen. Sherman w
wo months. A brief paragraph suffices to dispose of an important case, and it is fortunate, considering that economy of space is desirable in these last times, that all the fashions of old England have not been transmitted to this day and generation. During the time of the "Long Parliament," under Cromwell, it was common among the most fanatical of the fathers of New England Puritanism to adopt scriptural names, some of them consisting of several words of a favorite text. We subjoin the names of a jury said to have been empaneled in Sussex, England, which presents a fair sample of the names of that period, and may serve to amuse the reader: Accepted Trevor, Redeemed Compton, God Reward Smart, Earth Adams, Kill Sin Pimple, Be Faithful Joiner, Fight the Good Fight of Faith White, Hope for Bending, Meek Brewer, Faint Not Hewitt, Make Peace Heaton, Stand Fast on High Stringer, Called Lower, Return Spelman, Fly Debate Roberts, More Fruit Fowler, Weep Not Billing, Graceful Hurding.
[communicated.]Confederate States of America, medical Purveyor's office, Richmond, Va., Nov. 25, 1861. I desire to acknowledge the receipt of the following contributions: From Miss E. C. White and twenty other ladies of Philadelphia, East Tennessee--19 blankets, 2 comforts, 48 handkerchiefs, 5 pairs socks, 20 towels. From the ladies of Athens, East Tennessee--7 quilts, 7 shirts, 3 sheets. 2 pillow-cases, 1 pair pants, 3 blankets, 2 pillows. From Mrs. Lenoir, Tennessee--3 blanket, 1 quilt. From J. F. Jones, Tennessee--1 blanket, 1 red quilt, 1 pillow case, 1 sheet. From the ladies of New Market, Tennessee--24 blankets, 15 comforts, 10 comforts. From J. R. Reed, J. W. Lusk, and others, Tennessee--5 comforts, 1 blanket, 4 pillows. From the ladies of Louisville, Blount co., Tennessee--11 blankets, 17 comforts. From Mrs. John Browden and Mrs. Alexander, Tennessee--7 comforts, 3 blankets, 3 pillows. From Mrs. Cox, Mrs. Saffell, Mrs. Lov