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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 190 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 24 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 10 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 10 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book. You can also browse the collection for J. G. Whittier or search for J. G. Whittier in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, II (search)
ed the mother country, and this because of the identity of language. All retrospective English literature—that is, all literature more than a century or two old—is common to the two countries. All contemporary literature cannot yet be judged, because it is contemporary. The time may come when not a line of current English poetry may remain except the four quatrains hung up in St. Margaret's Church and when the Matthew Arnold of Macaulay's imaginary New Zealand may find with surprise that Whittier and Lowell produced something more worthy of that accidental immortality than Browning or Tennyson. The time may come when a careful study of even the despised American newspapers may reveal them to have been in one respect nearer to a high civilization than any of their European compeers; since the leading American literary journals criticise their own contributors with the utmost freedom, while there does not seem to be a journal in London or Paris that even attempts that courageous can
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, VI (search)
nners and a European subject. But a simple and home-loving American, who writes upon the themes furnished by his own nation, without pyrotechnics or fantastic spelling, is apt to seem to the English mind quite uninteresting. There is nothing which ordinarily interests Europeans less than an Americanism unaccompanied by a war-whoop. The Saturday Review, wishing to emphasize its contempt for Henry Ward Beecher, finally declares that one would turn from him with relief even to the poems of Whittier. There could hardly have been a more exhaustive proof of this local limitation or chauvinisme than I myself noticed at a London dinner-party some years ago. Our host was an Oxford professor, and the company was an eminent one. Being hard pressed about American literature, I had said incidentally that a great deal of intellectual activity in America was occupied, and rightly, by the elucidation of our own history,—a thing, I added, which inspired almost no interest in England. This fact
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, VII (search)
performance. This is doubtless to be attributed rather to ignorance than to that want of seriousness which Mr. Stedman so justly points out among the younger Englishmen. The Boston of which he speaks was the Boston of Garrison and Phillips, of Whittier and Theodore Parker; it was the headquarters of those old-time abolitionists of whom the English Earl of Carlisle wrote that they were fighting a battle without a parallel in the history of ancient or modern heroism. It was also the place whichan instance where art was its own sufficient stimulus. In the cases of a writer like Poe, we trace no tonic element. The great anti-slavery agitation and the general reformatory mood of half a century ago undoubtedly gave us Channing, Emerson, Whittier, Longfellow, and Lowell; not that they would not have been conspicuous in any case, but that the moral attribute in their natures might have been far less marked. The great temporary fame of Mrs. Stowe was identified with the same influence. H
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, XI (search)
ning the only verses by a living author hung up for contemplation in Westminster Abbey—still stands as the highwater mark of his genius, although possibly, so great is the advantage possessed by a shorter poem, it may be superseded at last by his Daughters of Time. No one doubts that Bayard Taylor will go down to fame, if at all, by his brief Legend of Balaklava, and Julia Ward Howe by her Battle Hymn of the Republic. It is, perhaps, characteristic of the even and well-distributed muse of Whittier that it is less easy to select his high-water mark; but perhaps My Playmate comes as near to it as anything. Bryant's Waterfowl is easily selected, and so is Longfellow's Wreck of the Hesperus, as conveying more sense of shaping imagination than any other, while Evangeline would, of course, command the majority of votes among his longer poems. In some cases, as in Whitman's My Captain, the high-water mark may have been attained precisely at the moment when the poet departed from his the
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, XVIII (search)
d catalogues instead of one, it really would afford as fair an approximation as we are likely to obtain to a National gallery of eminent persons. It is easily to be seen that no similar gallery of living persons would have much value. It is not, ordinarily, until after a man's death that serious criticism or biography begins. Comparing a few living names, we find that there are already, in the Cleveland catalogue, subsidiary references to certain living persons, as follows:— Holmes, Whittier12 Mrs. Stowe8 Whitman5 Ex-President Cleveland4 Harte3 Blaine, Howells, James2 Hale, Parkman1 These figures, so far as they go, exhibit the same combination of public and literary service with those previously given. Like those, they effectually dispose of the foolish tradition that republican government tends to a dull mediocrity. Here we see a people honoring by silent suffrages their National leaders, and recording the votes in the catalogue of every town library. There is n
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, Index (search)
see Clemens. Tyndall, John, 22. U, V. Urquhart, David, 208, 209. Vestris, M., 83. Virgil, 99, 171, 217. Voltaire, F. M. A. de, 52, 53, 83, 187, 189 Von Holst, H. E., 32. W. Wagner, Richard, 16. Wallace, H. B., 51. Wallace, Lew, 67. Walpole, Horace, 135, 210. Walton, Izaak, 202. Walworth, M. T., 198, 200. Ward, Artemus, 59. Warner, C. D., 2. 72. Washington, George, 112, 155. Wasson, D. A., v., 103. Weapons of precision, 192. Webb, R. D., 29. Webster, Daniel, 155, 224. Weiss, John, 104. Weller, Sam, 182. Westminster Abbey of a book catalogue, 152. White, J. Blanco, 98. Whitman, Walt, 58, 67, 100. Whittier, J. G., 25, 60, 62, 66. Wieland, C. M., 90. Wilde, Oscar, 93. William the Silent, 6. Willis, N. P., 27, 28, 29, 93. Wilkins, Mary E., 11. Winsor, Justin, 172. Wolfe, General, 103. Wolseley, Lord, 123. Wordsworth, William, 94, 217. World-literature, a, 228. Z. Zelter, C. F., 97. Zincke, Canon, 39. Zola, Emile, 56, 229.