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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 327 1 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 86 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 82 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 44 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 42 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 38 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 38 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 36 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 32 0 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall). You can also browse the collection for John Greenleaf Whittier or search for John Greenleaf Whittier in all documents.

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Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To David Lee Child. (search)
early wrenched from the bush and two of the eggs on the ground. They were still warm, so I replaced them, righted the nest and fastened it to the twigs with strings. To my great surprise she returned to her patient labor of incubation. ... Mrs. S. returned on Friday, and I went as far as Boston with her. The day was so intensely hot that I regretted having put my head into the city. But as I was toiling along I heard a voice behind me exclaim, Maria Child! I turned and recognized John G. Whittier. He said he had missed the cars by some mistake, but now he felt the disappointment was providential; he had for a long time so wanted to see me. I could not bear to go into the office where I had been accustomed to take my friends. I knew the empty chair of that dear lost friend Ellis Gray Loring. would be too much for me. So I asked him into H.'s office, and there we chatted an hour. Mrs. S. regretted your absence, left kind remembrances for you, and told me I was a happy woman
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Lines to L. M. Child, in response to her verses on the death of Elis Gray Loring. (search)
Lines to L. M. Child, in response to her verses on the death of Elis Gray Loring. John G. Whittier. The sweet spring day is glad with music, But through it sounds a sadder strain, The worthiest of our narrowing circle Sings Loring's dirges o'er again. O woman greatly loved I join thee In tender memories of our friend; With thee across the awful spaces, The greeting of a soul I send. What cheer hath he? How is it with him? Where lingers he this weary while? Over what pleasant fields of heaven Dawns the sweet sunshine of his smile? Does he not know our feet are treading The earth hard down on Slavery's grave? That in our crowning exultations We miss the charm his presence gave? Why on this spring air comes no whisper From him to tell us all is well? Why to our flower time comes no token Of lily and of asphodel? I feel the unutterable longing, Thy hunger of the heart is mine; I reach and grasp for hands in darkness, My ear grows sharp for voice or sign. Still on the lips of all we
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To John G. Whittier. (search)
To John G. Whittier. Wayland, September 10, 1861. Dear friend Whittier,--. .. Nothing on earth has such effect on the popular heart as songs, which the soldiers would take up with enthusiasm, and which it would thereby become the fashion to whistle and sing at the street corners. Old John Brown, Hallelujah! is performing a wonderful mission now. Where the words came from, nobody knows, and the tune is an exciting, spirit-stirring thing, hitherto unknown outside of Methodist conventicles. But it warms up soldiers and boys, and the air is full of it; just as France was of the Marseillaise, whose author was for years unknown. If the soldiers only had a song, to some spirit-stirring tune, proclaiming what they went to fight for, or thought they went to fight for,--for home, country and liberty, and indignantly announcing that they did not go to hunt slaves, to send back to their tyrants poor lacerated workmen who for years had been toiling for the rich without wages; if they had
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To John G. Whittier. (search)
To John G. Whittier. Wayland, January 10, 1871. I thank you, from my heart, for your volume of beautiful poems, and for the kind inscription. But what is the world coming to when a plain-coated Friend dates Christmas instead of Twelfth Month? If thou departest from the ancient testimonies in this way, friend John, thou wilt assuredly be dealt with. I am very indifferent to anything the world can give, either its pleasures or its honors; and I am very little prone to envy, but I do envy you your wide-spread popularity, because it furnishes you with such ample means to scatter abroad the living seeds of goodness and truth. Thanks to the Heavenly Father, that the great opportunity fell into hands that used it so conscientiously and so industriously! For myself, I cannot accomplish much ; but I will try to deserve the acknowledgment, She hath done what she could. One of my old-time friends sent me, for a New Year's present, a book on Siam, by an English lady who was for severa
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To John G. Whittier. (search)
To John G. Whittier. Wayland, June 18, 1874. I cannot help writing to thank you for the Lines you have written to the memory of Charles Sumner. They are very beautiful, and nothing could be more appropriate. We went into Boston to hear Mr. Curtis's Memorial Address. I had been longing, amid all the fuss and formality, to hear just the right thing said about Mr. Sumner, and Mr. Curtis said it, and said it eloquently, from the heart. . . . Corruption is so widespread and so rampant, that I sometimes have gloomy forebodings concerning the future of this country; but the spontaneous and general homage to Charles Sumner's memory shows that there is still great respect for integrity deeply rooted in the popular mind. I was reading over several of your poems last week, and for the thousandth time I felt myself consoled and strengthened by them, as well as delighted with their poetic beauty. It was a very precious gift you received, dear friend, to be such a benefactor to the so
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To John G. Whittier. (search)
To John G. Whittier. Wayland, January 20, 1876. You remember Charles Sprague's description of scenes he witnessed from a window near State Street? First, Garrison dragged through the streets by a mob; second, Burns carried back to slavery by United States troops, through the same street; third, a black regiment marching down the same street to the tune of John Brown, to join the United States army for the emancipation of their race. What a thrilling historical poem might be made of that! I have always thought that no incident in the antislavery conflict, including the war, was at once so sublime and romantic as Robert G. Shaw riding through Washington Street at the head of that black regiment. He, so young, so fair, so graceful in his motions, so delicately nurtured, so high-bred in his manners, waving his sword to friends at the windows, like a brave young knight going forth to deeds of high emprise ; followed by that dark-faced train, so long trampled in the dust, and now awa
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Mrs. S. E. Sewall. (search)
Garrison, I have seemed to feel the presence of you and your dear, good husband, as you say you have felt line. I thought of you continually — on the day of the funeral, and while reading the beautiful tributes offered by Phillips and Weld and Whittier. If his spirit was there, how happy he must have been! The general laudation in the newspapers was truly wonderful. If any prophet had foretold it thirty years ago, who would have believed him? It seems to me there never was so great a morale been much more so to have heard them. If Mr. Garrison was mistaken in his strong belief that individual, conscious existence continued elsewhere, he will never know of his mistake ; but I think he was not mistaken. I suppose you noticed that Whittier recognized his spirit as still active in defending the right. How could such a spirit die? I should think that painful Pocasset tragedy might open people's eyes to the absurdity of taking the records of a semi-barbarous people for an inspire
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Theodore D. Weld. (search)
ly forgetful of self than were the abolitionists in those early days, before the moral force which emanated from them had become available as a political power. All, my friend, that is the only true church organization, when heads and hearts unite in working for the welfare of the human race! And how wonderfully everything came as it was wanted! How quickly the mingled flute and trumpet eloquence of Phillips responded to the clarion call of Garrison! How the clear, rich bugle-tones of Whittier wakened echoes in all living souls! How wealth poured from the ever-open hands of Arthur Tappan, Gerrit Smith, the Winslows, and thousands of others who gave even more largely in proportion to their smaller means! How the time-serving policy of Dr. Beecher drove the bold, brave boys of Lane Seminary into the battle-field! Politicians said, The abolitionists exaggerate the evil; they do not know whereof they affirm; and in response up rose Angelina and her sister Sarah, shrinking from
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Appendix. (search)
f all we sought. Did we not witness in the life of thee Immortal prophecy? And feel, when with thee, that thy footsteps trod An everlasting road? Not for brief days thy generous sympathies, Thy scorn of selfish ease; Not for the poor prize of an earthly goal Thy strong uplift of soul. Than thine was never turned a fonder heart To nature and to art In fair-formed Hellas in her golden prime, Thy Philothea's time. Yet, loving beauty, thou couldst pass it by, And for the poor deny Thyself, and see thy fresh, sweet flower of fame Wither in blight and blame. Sharing His love who holds in His embrace The lowliest of our race, Sure the Divine economy must be Conservative of thee! For truth must live with truth, self-sacrifice Seek out its great allies; Good must find good by gravitation sure, And love with love endure. And so, since thou hast passed within the gate Whereby awhile I wait, I give blind grief and blinder sense the lie: Thou hast not lived to die! John Greenleaf Whittier.
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), List of Mrs. Child's works, with the date of their first publication as far as ascertained. (search)
the United States; Old Scip; Derivation of Negro; Opinions of Travellers; Jamaica Mobs. Follen, Mrs., Remember the slave; The runaway slave. Child, D. L. Henry Diaz; Three Colored Republics of Guiana; Judicial Decisions in Slave States. Whittier, J. G. The Slave Ships. Whittier, E. H. The Slave Trader. Bradley, J. History of J. B,, by Himself. may, Rev. S. J. Miss Crandall's School. Florence. The Infant Abolitionist. Gould, H. F. The Land of the Free.-English Protest agaiWhittier, E. H. The Slave Trader. Bradley, J. History of J. B,, by Himself. may, Rev. S. J. Miss Crandall's School. Florence. The Infant Abolitionist. Gould, H. F. The Land of the Free.-English Protest against the Colonization Society.-Alexander Vasselin.-Cornelius of St. Croix.-Ruins of Egyptian Thebes.-History of Thomas Jenkins.--A Negro Hunt.--An Anti-Slavery Catechism. Newburyport, 1836. 12vo. The Evils of Slavery and the Curse of Slavery. The first proved by the opinions of Southerners themselves; the last shown by historical evidence. Newburyport, 1836. 12vo. Philothea: a Romance. Boston, 1836. 12vo. The Family Nurse. Boston, 1837. 12vo. Authentic Narratives of American Slav
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