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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 327 1 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 86 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 82 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 44 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 42 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 38 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 38 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 36 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 32 0 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life. You can also browse the collection for John Greenleaf Whittier or search for John Greenleaf Whittier in all documents.

Your search returned 18 results in 7 document sections:

Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, VI: in and out of the pulpit (search)
nomination of the Free Soil Party for Congress and wrote thus to his brother:— You have probably seen my nomination for Congress. I did all I could to get Whittier nominated, but he obstinately declined, and it was he who proposed my name. . . . Perhaps I should not have started my [local] newspaper column had I expectednd told me anecdotes of Henry's ways which are more domestic and filial than one would suppose. While at Newburyport, Higginson renewed his acquaintance with Whittier, having first met him when a boy of nineteen. I spent a day in Amesbury and saw Whittier. . . . Dark, slender, bald, blackhaired, kind, calm, flashing eyeWhittier. . . . Dark, slender, bald, blackhaired, kind, calm, flashing eyed, keen, somewhat narrow; not commanding, but interesting. Evidently injured by politics, easily content with limited views; yet sympathetic and (probably) generous. Lives in an appropriate cottage yet very simple. A queer compound of Yankee-Quaker and Yankee-hero and Yankee-poet; the nationality everywhere. He would whittle,
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XII: the Black regiment (search)
till to be see . . . . As I sit in my tent door and adjudicate contested cases where the lingo is almost inexplicable, and the dusky faces grow radiant and sometimes majestic with eager expression, I seem like Rajah Brooke in Borneo; or like Whittier's lost Southern playmate: The dusky children of the sun Before me come and go Who should drive out to see me to-day but Harriet Tubman [the escaped slave, who rescued many of her race and conducted them to freedom] who is living in Beadrawback. Camp life was brightened at this time by the arrival of the Quartermaster's baby, and later Colonel Higginson wrote a paper called The Baby of the Regiment which was printed in Our Young Folks, afterwards in Army Life, and included in Whittier's Child Life in Prose. The author wrote to his wife in February, 1864:— Our ladies are quite alarmed at a Department order inquiring as to the number of officers' wives in the regiment—it is feared they are to be sent North, which heaven
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XIII: Oldport Days (search)
fall in love with him, delicate and feeble as he is physically. Of a farewell dinner given for Wilkie Collins in 1874, Colonel Higginson wrote:— There were only eight literary men there and I remember noticing how much brighter were Mr. Whittier's eyes than those of anybody else, though he looks old and thin and sick. On this occasion he first saw Mark Twain who impressed him as something of a buffoon, though with earnestness underneath; and when afterwards at his own house in Hartforht and make about $450 by the trip—beside the interest and satisfaction of it, which pays for itself. His lectures nearer home often gave him pleasant glimpses of the life of old friends. At Amesbury, he wrote to his sisters, I staid with Whittier who . . . seems brighter than I expected in his loneliness. . . . He has a singular companion—a wonderful parrot, 30 years old, an African parrot Quaker colored with a scarlet tail. The only sensible and intelligible parrot I ever saw, and we h<
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XV: journeys (search)
onfirmed what I had heard that there is a strong reaction against Dickens—it is not the thing to admire him, his subjects are thought commonplace and his sentiments forced. Walt Whitman among their set is the American poet; the taste for Miller has passed by and though he is here his poetry is forgotten. He was thought original and characteristic and when he came to parties with trousers thrust in his boots, he was thought the only American who dared do in England as he would do at home. Whittier was unknown they said, and Lowell only through the Biglow Papers. Swinburne calls him no poet but a critic who tries to write poetry. (13-14 June) I spent in Conway's Convention which was very interesting and called out strong character and ready speaking. I was on the committee too to draft the Constitution which differs somewhat from our Free Religious Association (as does the name Association of Liberal Thinkers). The best known people in it were Voysey (a small and narrow soul who
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XVI: the crowning years (search)
the Military History was off his hands he wrote, Tales of the Enchanted Islands of the Atlantic, Book and Heart, and Old Cambridge. In 1900, he began a Life of Longfellow for the American Men of Letters series, and in 1902 wrote a biography of Whittier, recording in July, Have worked for ten days on Whittier—averaging 1000 words daily. The French writer, Th. Bentzon (Mme. Blanc), after visiting this country in the nineties, wrote an account of Colonel Higginson which was translated with thWhittier—averaging 1000 words daily. The French writer, Th. Bentzon (Mme. Blanc), after visiting this country in the nineties, wrote an account of Colonel Higginson which was translated with the inapt title, A Typical American. The 1902 diary says:— Received proof of A Typical American, by Madame Blanc; a London translation into English sent me for revision. I regard this as the greatest honor of my life, in a literary way—--to be treated so fully in the Revue des Deux Mondes by so able and so distinguished a woman and then to have it fully translated and published in London. Of course it gratified me, even if sometimes overstated and undeserved, gratified more than such p
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, Bibliography (search)
Editorials. (In Index, Woman's Journal.) 1874 (Newport) The Baby of the Regiment. (In Whittier, comp. Child Life in Prose.) Reprinted from Army Life in a Black Regiment. 1870. How the AmII. Contents: Ralph Waldo Emerson. Amos Bronson Alcott. Theodore Parker. John Greenleaf Whittier. Walt Whitman. Sidney Lanier. An Evening with Mrs. Hawthorne. Lydia Maria Ch02 [Life of] Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. (In American Men of Letters.) [Life of] John Greenleaf Whittier. (In English Men of Letters.) Horace Elisha Scudder: A Memorial. (In American Acadublished in the same periodical for 1904, form the volume Part of a Man's Life. Garrison and Whittier. (In Independent, Dec.) The Place of Whittier Among Poets. (In The Reader's Magazine, Feb.. (In Independent, Feb. 21.) Literature (1857-1907). (In Atlantic Monthly, Nov.) John Greenleaf Whittier. (In Independent, Dec. 19.) Literature at Off Tide. (With others.) (In Literature o<
ys, 262; charm of military life, 262, 263, 282; translates Epictetus, 263; edits Harvard Memorial Biographies, 263, 275; as a public speaker, 263-66, 273; visits Whittier, 266; visits Emerson, 266; and the Boston Radical Club, 267, 263; religious toleration of, 268; his Creed, 268-70; influence of Emerson, 270; various honors, 270re, 3. Western Reserve University, confers degree on Col. Higginson, 377; Higginson lectures at, 382. Whitman, Walt, 336; Higginson quotes, 395. Whittier, John Greenleaf, 336; Higginson visits, 98, 266; described, 259. Whittier, John Greenleaf, 424; Higginson at work on, 386. Williams, Henry, 233. Wilson, John. SeeWhittier, John Greenleaf, 424; Higginson at work on, 386. Williams, Henry, 233. Wilson, John. See North, Christopher. Woman and the Alphabet, or Ought Women to learn the Alphabet? 407; inquiry about, 156; influence of, 156, 157. Women and Men, 308, 418. Woman Who Most Influenced Me, The, 7, 421. Woman's Suffrage, rights of women, 73, 92, 93, 137, 138, 141; convention, 134-36, 266; Bill, 296, 297; in England, 331,