Your search returned 29 results in 12 document sections:

1 2
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Eleventh Corps at Chancellorsville. (search)
ral Devens's exposed right flank. As to pickets, each division had a good line of them. My aide, Major Charles H. Howard, assisted in connecting them between divisions, and during the 2d of May that fearless and faithful staff-officer, Major E. Whittlesey, rode the entire circuit of their front to stimulate them to special activity. Those of Devens were thrown out at a distance from a half-mile to a mile and stretching well around covering our right flank ; See General Devens's report oe division I knew could just face about and defend the same point. A few companies of cavalry came from Pleasonton. I sent them out. Go out beyond my right; go far, and let me know if an assault is coming. All my staff, Asmussen, Meysenberg, Whittlesey, C. H. Howard, Schofield, Dessauer, Stinson, Schirmer, and Hoffmann, were keenly on the alert. We had not a very good position, it is true, but we did expect to make a good strong fight should the enemy come. General Hooker's circular order
im and his officers able and hearty cooperators, frequently giving me material aid not connected with that special department. Whenever an opportunity has afforded, our batteries have been located, intrenched, and handled in the most skilful manner. Quite brisk artillery duels transpired after our investment of Savannah, where my attention was particularly called to the artillery of the command, and when I have had occasion to admire the skill and bravery of its officers and men. Major E. Whittlesey, Judge-Advocate of the department, has afforded me substantial aid by carefully revising all the courts-martial and records of military commissions, beside doing ably other important duties connected with different departments of the service. Captain D. H. Buell, Chief of Ordnance, receives my commendations for his carefulness in regulating the ordnance supplies in such manner as to occasion me no trouble or anxiety. Captain E. P. Pearson, Jr., Commissary of Musters, assisted me
im and his officers able and hearty cooperators, frequently giving me material aid not connected with that special department. Whenever an opportunity has afforded, our batteries have been located, intrenched, and handled in the most skilful manner. Quite brisk artillery duels transpired after our investment of Savannah, where my attention was particularly called to the artillery of the command, and when I have had occasion to admire the skill and bravery of its officers and men. Major E. Whittlesey, Judge-Advocate of the department, has afforded me substantial aid by carefully revising all the courts-martial and records of military commissions, beside doing ably other important duties connected with different departments of the service. Captain D. H. Buell, Chief of Ordnance, receives my commendations for his carefulness in regulating the ordnance supplies in such manner as to occasion me no trouble or anxiety. Captain E. P. Pearson, Jr., Commissary of Musters, assisted me
Wever, Clark R., Feb. 9, 1865. Wheelock, Charles, Aug. 9, 1864. Wherry, Wm. M., April 2, 1865. White, Daniel, Mar. 13, 1865. Whitaker, E. W., Mar. 13, 1865. Whistler, J. N. G., Mar. 13, 1865. Whitbeck, H. N., Mar. 13, 1865. White, Carr B., Mar. 13, 1865. White, David B., Mar. 13, 1865. White, Frank, Mar. 13, 1865. White, Frank J., Mar. 13, 1865. White, Harry, Mar. 2, 1865. Whittier, Chas. A., April 9, 1865. Whittier, F. H., Mar. 13, 1865. Whittlesey, C. H., Mar. 13, 1865. Whittlesey, E., Mar. 13, 1865. Whittlesey, H. M., Mar. 13, 1865. Wilcox, Jas. A., Feb. 13, 1865. Wilcox, John S., Mar. 13, 1865. Wilder, John T., Aug. 7, 1864. Wildes, Thos. F., Mar. 11, 1865. Wildrick, A. C., April 2, 1865. Wiles, G. F., Mar. 13, 1865. Wiley, Aquila, Mar. 13, 1865. Wiley, Dan'l D., Mar. 13, 1865. Williams, A. W., Mar. 13, 1865. Williams, Jas. M., July 13, 1865. Williams, John, Mar. 13, 1865. Williams, R., Mar. 13, 1865. Williams, T. J., Sept. 22, 1862. Willian, John, Ap
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Freedmen's Bureau. (search)
Freedmen's Bureau. Early in 1865 Congress established a Bureau of Freedmen, Refugees, and Abandoned Lands, attached to the War Department; and early in May Gen. Oliver O. Howard (q. v.) was appointed commissioner. He appointed eleven assistant commissioners, all army officers; namely—for the District of Columbia, Gen. John Eaton, Jr.; Virginia, Col. O. Brown; North Carolina, Col. E. Whittlesey; South Carolina and Georgia, Gen. R. Sexton; Florida, Col. T. W. Osborne; Alabama, Gen. W. Swayne; Louisiana, first the Rev. T. W. Conway, and then Gen. A. Baird; Texas, Gen. E. M. Gregory; Mississippi, Col. S. Thomas; Kentucky and Tennessee, Gen. C. B. Fisk, Missouri and Arkansas, Gen. J. W. Sprague. The bureau took under its charge the freedmen, the refugees, and the abandoned lands in the South, for the purpose of protecting the freedmen and the refugees in their rights, and returning the lands to their proper owners. In this work right and justice were vindicated. To make the opera
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Garfield, James Abram 1831-1881 (search)
contract with those chiefs, by which they purchased all the rights of those Indians to the lands on the Reserve, for £500, New York currency, to be paid in goods to the Western Indians, and two beef cattle and 100 gallons of whiskey to the Eastern Indians, besides gifts and provisions to all of them. Setting out from Buffalo on June 27, they coasted along the shore of the lake, some of the party in boats and others marching along the banks. In the journal of Seth Pease, published in Whittlesey's History of Cleveland, I find the following: Monday, July 4, 1796.—We that came by land arrived at the confines of New Connecticut, and gave three cheers precisely at five o'clock P. M. We then proceeded to Conneaut, at five hours thirty minutes, our boats got on an hour after; we pitched our tents on the east side. In the journal of General Cleaveland is the following entry: On this Creek ( Conneaugh ), in New Connecticut Land, July 4, 1796, under General Moses Cleavelan
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 13: General E. V. Sumner and my first reconnoissance (search)
through a most distinguished career of work and promotion to exercise eminent civil functions after the war, and Miller, who fell in our first great battle. My brother, Lieutenant C. H. Howard, and Lieutenant Nelson A. Miles were then my aids. Sumner, noticing his conduct in action, used to say of Miles: That officer will get promoted or get killed. F. D. Sewall, for many months my industrious adjutant general, took the colonelcy of the Nineteenth Maine, and my able judge advocate, E. Whittlesey, at last accepted the colonelcy of another regiment. The acting brigade commissary, George W. Balloch, then a lieutenant in the Fifth New Hampshire, adhered to his staff department and was a colonel and chief commissary of a corps before the conflict ended. To comprehend McClellan's responsibility and action after he came to Washington, we must call to mind the fact that he did not simply command the Army of the Potomac, which he had succeeded in organizing out of the chaos and confu
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 19: the battle of Antietam; I succeed Sedgwick in command of a division (search)
ose musketry fire, though aids and orderlies were coming and going amid the shots, seemingly as thick as hail, not one individual of this group was hit. Captain E. Whittlesey had taken the place of F. D. Sewall, then colonel of the Nineteenth Maine, as adjutant general of the brigade. He and my brother, Lieutenant Howard, badly wounded at Fair Oaks, had rejoined after the command left Washington. It was the first time I had seen Whittlesey under fire. He reminded me, as I observed him, of General Sykes, who, in action, never moved a muscle. The effect of this imperturbability on the part of a commander was wholesome. With a less stern countenance, but an equally strong will, Whittlesey was to me from that time the kind of help I needed in battle. Lieutenant Howard also, if he detected the least lack of coolness in me, would say quietly: Aren't you a little excited? This was enough to suppress any momentary nervousness. The worst thing which resulted from our retreat tha
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 20: General Burnside assumes command of the army of the Potomac (search)
o Harper's Ferry, he said that, in honor of the Virginians of that day, it might well have been named The Skeered Virginian. He admired the horsemanship of Captain Whittlesey, and when some one said, That officer was lately a parson, he looked pleasantly after him as he galloped off to carry some order, and remarked, as if to him's Ferry November 5, 1862, about ten o'clock at night. My brigade surgeon, Dr. Palmer, being left behind in charge of the sick and wounded, gave welcome to Captain Whittlesey and myself, and kept us for the night. The army had gone. McClellan had decided to take President Lincoln's suggestion and move east of the Blue Ridge. On the morning of the 6th, with a borrowed horse and an old ambulance, Whittlesey and I crossed the Shenandoah and pulled on with all the speed we could command after the army. We rode up the Catoctin Valley over an unguarded road. From the poor condition of our horse we had to be satisfied with thirtyfive miles the first day
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 21: battle of Fredericksburg (search)
Chapter 21: battle of Fredericksburg In the early morning of the 13th, about 3 A. M., I wrote a home letter for my children that is preserved: We are now in a house abandoned by Mr. Knox, and near the front line. One or two shells have passed clear through the house, but my room is in pretty good shape. Charles (Lieutenant Howard) is well and sleeping. So are Lieutenant Stinson, Captain Whittlesey, Lieutenants Steel and Atwood sleeping on the floor near me. I am sitting on this floor near a fireplace . . . writing on my lap, having an inkstand, candlestick, and paper on a large portfolio, with Tom, a little colored boy, holding up the outer edge. Tom drops to sleep now and then, when my candlestick with its light, and inkstand with its ink, slip down; but I wake Tom and it is soon all righted. That very morning a little later a charming old lady saw my staff officers and myself at breakfast, and listened to the brief reading of Scripture and morning prayer. She
1 2