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I have the honor to report the services rendered by my command, in the recent battles and skirmishes near Richmond, from the twenty-fifth ultimo to the sixth instant: The force under my command consisted of the Fourth Virginia cavalry, Captain Chamberlain commanding, and the Jeff Davis legion of cavalry. On the twenty-fifth ultimo, I had a line of pickets from Woodring's shop, on the Ashland road, along that road to Ashland, and thence toward Hanover Court-House, to the residence of Colonel Wickham. On the afternoon of that day, after General Jackson's advance guard had reached the neighborhood of Ashland, a company of the Eighth Illinois cavalry drove in my videttes from the point where the Ashcake road crossed the Telegraph road. I ordered Lieutenant Smith, of the Black Horse cavalry, Fourth Virginia, with seventeen men, to drive the enemy back. He charged at once, and the enemy fled, leaving two horses dead on the road, carrying off one man killed and one wounded in the char
ith great difficulty, and the energetic and thorough-going Wickham was sent, with his regiment, (Fourth Virginia cavalry,) toake charge of the whole. The Fourth Virginia cavalry (Colonel Wickham) was sent around to gain the rear of Manassas, and wittatements of Surgeon Eliason, with me at the time, and Colonel Wickham, who show wherein General Trimble is in error in his rd Trimble's arrival to make the attack, as well as to give Wickham more time, with his regiment, to seize the avenues in rearthe centre should rest on the railroad. The cavalry under Wickham had already been sent long before Trimble's arrival to seize the avenues of escape and await events. Wickham, Eliason, and myself have corresponding impressions, without conference, as to the events of the night. Wickham says he carried out his instructions to the letter, and reported to General Trimble a not get in till late the next day. Does that signify that Wickham, with his regiment, was not in the right place and perform
e plank road, extending on the right to the mine road, and to the left in the direction of the Catharine furnace. Colonel Wickham, with the Fourth Virginia cavalry and Colonel Owen's regiment, was stationed between the mine road and the Rappahannat the enemy had crossed at Fredericksburg, and taken Marye's hill. An Aid-de-camp of General Sedgwick, captured by Colonel Wickham's regiment on the right, near Banks's Ford, reported two corps, under command of Sedgwick. The commanding General dis command was about nineteen hundred aggregate, which was not so numerous as the single brigade of General Kershaw. Colonel Wickham offered his services to point out the different crossings on the river, and I rode down the river road with him. A tory, the cavalry did most essential service in watching our flanks, and holding the Ely's Ford road in the enemy's rear, Wickham and Owen being on the extreme right. The horse artillery kept pace with the infantry in the battle of the Wilderness, l
anished. Torbert had been sent down Luray Valley in pursuit of the Confederate cavalry, with the hope of scattering it and seizing New Market in time to cut off the Confederate retreat from Fisher's Hill. But at Milford, in a narrow gorge, General Wickham held Torbert and prevented the fulfilment of his plan; and General Early's whole force was able to escape. Day after day this continued until Early had taken refuge in the Blue Ridge in front of Brown's Gap. Here he received reenforcementslls. As the army of Sheridan proceeded down the Valley, the undaunted cavaliers of Early came in pursuit. His horsemen kept close to the rear of the Union columns. On the morning of October 9th, the cavalry leader, Rosser, who had succeeded Wickham, found himself confronted by General Custer's division, at Tom's Brook. At the same time the Federal general, Wesley Merritt, fell upon the cavalry of Lomax and Johnson on an adjacent road. The two Union forces were soon united and a mounted b
anished. Torbert had been sent down Luray Valley in pursuit of the Confederate cavalry, with the hope of scattering it and seizing New Market in time to cut off the Confederate retreat from Fisher's Hill. But at Milford, in a narrow gorge, General Wickham held Torbert and prevented the fulfilment of his plan; and General Early's whole force was able to escape. Day after day this continued until Early had taken refuge in the Blue Ridge in front of Brown's Gap. Here he received reenforcementslls. As the army of Sheridan proceeded down the Valley, the undaunted cavaliers of Early came in pursuit. His horsemen kept close to the rear of the Union columns. On the morning of October 9th, the cavalry leader, Rosser, who had succeeded Wickham, found himself confronted by General Custer's division, at Tom's Brook. At the same time the Federal general, Wesley Merritt, fell upon the cavalry of Lomax and Johnson on an adjacent road. The two Union forces were soon united and a mounted b
uit, crossing the Pamunkey and the Mattapony, but at length he fell into an ambuscade near King and Queen Court House where he lost his life, as did many of his command. We have reached now, in the order of time, the Wilderness campaign which opened May 4, 1864. General Grant's object was to interpose his army between Lee and Richmond. Sheridan, with about ten thousand cavalry and several batteries, had moved to Hamilton's Crossing and thence toward Richmond, on the Telegraph road. General Wickham, with his brigade, followed in pursuit. Near Mitchell's shop he was joined by Fitzhugh Lee, with about five thousand cavalry. Stuart, now in command, moved toward Yellow Tavern, which he reached before the appearance of Sheridan's troopers. They did appear, however, and attempted to drive Stuart from the Telegraph road. A severe fight ensued, in which Stuart lost heavily in officers, but maintained his position. About four o'clock in the afternoon, a brigade of Federal cavalry at
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.34 (search)
hoped to win safety, but offering, in desperation, a seemingly bold front prepared for battle. Informed by a negro, whose knowledge of the country notably expanded at sight of a six-shooter, that there was a blind-road leading in rear of Wilson's left, Fitz. Lee at once pushed forward with his dusky guide, and having assured himself by personal reconnoissance of the truth of the information, quickly made his dispositions. Lomax's horsemen, dismounted, were formed across this road, with Wickham's mounted brigade in reserve, the latter being instructed to charge so soon as Lomax had shaken the enemy. In a twinkling, as it seemed, the rattling fire of the carbines told that Lomax was hotly engaged, and on the instant the movement in front began — the infantry, under Mahone, advancing swiftly across the open field, pouring in a biting volley, Pegram firing rapidly for a few moments, then limbering up and going forward at a gallop to come into battery on a line with the infantry, whi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart's report of his cavalry expedition into Pennsylvania in October, 1862. (search)
om our guns on this side. I lost not a man killed on the expedition, and only a few slight wounds. The enemy's loss is not known, but Pelham's one gun compelled the enemy's battery to change its position three times. The remainder of the march was destitute of interest. The conduct of the command and their behavior towards the inhabitants is worthy of the highest praise; a few individual cases only were exceptions in this particular. Brigadier-General Hampton and Colonels Lee, Jones, Wickham and Butler, and the officers and men under their command are entitled to my lasting gratitude for their coolness in danger and cheerful obedience to orders. Unoffending persons were treated with civility, and the inhabitants were generous in proffers of provisions on the march. We seized and brought over a large number of horses, the property of citizens of the United States. The valuable information obtained in this reconnoissance as to the distribution of the enemy's force was communic
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Cavalry operations in May, 1863--report of General J. E. B. Stuart. (search)
to threaten the enemy's rear. On the morning of May 2d, the cavalry of this brigade was disposed so as to clear Jackson's way in turning the enemy's right flank; this was done in the most successful manner, driving off the enemy's cavalry wherever it appeared, and enabled Jackson to suprise the enemy. In the subsequent operations attending the battle and glorious victory, the cavalry did most essential service in watching our flanks and holding the Eley's Ford road in the enemy's rear, Wickham and Owen being on the extreme right. The horse artillery kept pace, and in the battle of the Wilderness led the attack of artillery. Too much praise cannot be awarded the brave men who thus bore fatigue, hunger, loss of sleep, and danger without a murmur. The operations of Brigadier-General W. H. F. Lee, with his handful of men, are embraced in the memoranda furnished by him. His report is not only satisfactory, but gives evidence of sagacity and good conduct throughout, and of great
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chancellorsville--report of General R. E. Lee. (search)
river by a pontoon bridge. His right stretched westward along the Germana Ford road more than two miles. Darkness was approaching before the strength and extent of his line could be ascertained; and as the nature of the country rendered it hazardous to attack by night, our troops were halted, and formed in line of battle in front of Chancellorsville, at right angles to the plank road, extending on the right to the Mine road, and to the left in the direction of the Catharine furnace. Colonel Wickham, with the Fourth Virginia cavalry, and Colonel Owens' regiment, was stationed between the Mine road and the Rappahannock. The rest of the cavalry was upon our left flank. It was evident that a direct attack upon the enemy would be attended with great difficult and loss, in view of the strength of his position and his superiority of numbers. It was, therefore, resolved to endeavor to turn his right flank and gain his rear, leaving a force in front to hold him in check and conceal the
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