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ourth North Carolina in that brigade. At the opening of Grant's campaign, the First North Carolina was on picket duty along the Rapidan, and Colonel Cheek and Major Cowles were of signal service in reporting hostile movements. This regiment captured over 400 prisoners in a short time. When Sheridan, with a force estimated at from 10,000 to 12,000 men, started on his Richmond raid, General Stuart had only three available brigades for detachment to meet this formidable cavalcade. Taking Wickham's and Lomax's brigades under his personal command, General Stuart sought, by forced marches, to interpose between Sheridan and Richmond. He left Gordon's North Carolina brigade to retire before Sheridan, and harass him as much as such a pitifully inadequate number could harass so great a force as Sheridan commanded. Gordon's unflinching horsemen were involved in almost daily skirmishes with the Federals, and daily lost men he could ill spare from his thinning ranks. Among these was the
ave so as to gain success. The enemy must be defeated, and I rely upon you to do it. I will endeavor to have shoes, arms, and ammunition supplied you. Set all your officers to work bravely and hopefully, and all will go well. As regards the western cavalry, I think for the present the best thing you can do is to separate it. Perhaps there is a lack of confidence between officers and men. If you will attach one brigade to Rosser, making him a division, and one to Fitz Lee's division, under Wickham, Lomax will be able, I hope, to bring out the rest. The men are all good, and only require instruction and discipline. The enemy's force cannot be so greatly superior to yours. His effective infantry I do not think exceeds 12,000 men. We are obliged to fight against great odds. A kind Providence will yet overrule everything for our good. If Colonel Carter's wound incapacitates him for duty, you must select a good chief of artillery for the present. Wishing you every prosperity and suc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 8 (search)
On the 5th of October, General Thomas L. Rosser arrived from General Lee's army with his brigade. General Early, in his narrative, page 98, says, Rosser was attached to Fitz. Lee's division, of which he (Rosser) was given command, as Brigadier-General Wickham had resigned. The horses of Rosser's brigade had been so much reduced by previous hard service and the long march from Richmond, that the brigade did not exceed six hundred mounted men for duty when it joined me. Meantime we had movedair a division as was possible for an odd number of pieces to be shared; about three hundred and thirty prisoners fell into the hands of the victors, together with ambulances, caissons, a battery forge, the headquarters' wagons of Rosser, Lomax, Wickham, and Payne, and other wagons, forty-seven in number; in brief, almost everything on wheels. Of this engagement Torbert enthusiastically reports, that the cavalry totally covered themselves with glory and added to their long list of victories
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Stuart's expedition into Pennsylvania. (search)
ur guns on this side. 1 lost not a man killed on the expedition, and only a few slight wounds. The enemy's loss is not known, but Pelham's one gun compelled the enemy's battery to change its position three times. The remainder of the march was destitute of interest. The conduct of the command and their behavior towards the inhabitants is worthy of the highest praise; a few individual cases only were exceptions in this particular. Brigadier-General Hampton and Colonels Lee, Jones, Wickham and Butler, and the officers and men under their command, are entitled to my lasting gratitude for their coolness in danger and cheerful obedience to orders. Unoffending persons were treated with civility, and the inhabitants were generous in proffers of provisions on the march. We seized and brought over a large number of horses, the property of citizens of the United States. The valuable information obtained in this reconnoissance as to the distribution of the enemy's force was commu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
Ramseur's and Pegram's Divisions. Early in person, with Kershaw and Wharton and all the artillery, was to move along the Valley 'pike from Strausburg and attack the enemy's front and left as soon as Gordon was engaged. Rosser, with his own and Wickham's Brigades, was to cross Cedar creek on the enemy's right flank and attack simultaneously with Gordon, while Lomax, with his division, was to move to Front Royal across the river, thence to the Valley 'pike, and strike the enemy wherever the fir, had been the loss in all the brigades in the various fights and skirmishes in which they had been engaged, that the whole of this cavalry now under Lomax numbered only about 1,700 mounted men. Fitz Lee had brought with him two brigades—to-wit: Wickham's and Lomax's old Brigades (now under Colonel Payne), numbering about 1,200 mounted men. (Early's book, pp. 85, 86.) I have accepted each commander's statement as to his own troops, and they abundantly sustain me. 3. I have said that Sherida
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), First Manassas. (search)
rty or fifty horses. I base this opinion on the fact that we were in advance of all our forces, and by our charge the enemy were thrown into wild confusion before us, their vehicles of all sorts going off at full speed, and in the greatest disorder. Colonel Kershaw, in his report, at pages 524-522 of the same volume, says: Arrived at the house on the hill, which was occupied by the enemy as a hospital, having made many prisoners by the way, we found that a portion of our cavalry (Captains Wickham's and Radford's, and Powell's and Pitzer's), had had an engagement there with a battery of the enemy, which they had taken, but had retired after being fired on by the heavy reserve corps, which intervened between them and my command. This cavalry had come into the road by Lewis' Ford, below the stone bridge, and neither of us knew of the position of the other until some time after. * * * Reluctantly, I ordered my command to return; but, directing Colonel Cash to remain, I went with
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
Hanging of Mosby's men in 1864. [B. in Warrenton Virginian, February, 1896. After the defeat of General Early, at the battle of the Opequon. on September 19, 1864, his command fell back up the Valley. The brigade of cavalry under General Wickham occupied a strong position at Milford, twelve miles south of Front Royal, and Custer made repeated efforts to force him from the position, without effect. About this time it was reported to Captain Chapman, of Mosby's command, that a large wagon train was en route from Milford to Winchester, under the escort of a small body of men. He immediately made disposition for its capture at Front Royal. For this purpose he divided his men into two parties. One party was to attack the train at a point where a cross-road from Chester's Gap intersects the Front Royal and Luray grade; the other, under the immediate command of Chapman, was to fall upon the front of the train, about 600 yards from the town, where there is a hill on one side and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
the roads, water-courses, and points suitable for camping, was of great value in furnishing guides, for which purpose large details were made from it. In that famous charge at the battle of Williamsburg, with all the color-bearers and buglers at the head of the columns, with not a sabre or pistol drawn in the whole regiment, and impeded by a dense wood, where they had run into the mouth of McClellan's army of fifty thousand strong, the sable plumes of the Black Horse waved, and when Colonel Wickham was pierced through the body, General, then Major William H. Payne, took command, and was himself next day badly wounded. Details were at that time made from the Black Horse to carry dispatches between the general commanding, and Fort McGruder. Judge James Keith, of the present Court of Appeals of Virginia, then a private in the company, is said to have made many marvelous escapes, and greatly distinguished himself. General Longstreet, wishing men for picket duty, after failing to s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Goochland Light Dragoons. (search)
Goochland Light Dragoons. Organization and first outpost Experience—The Roll. To the Editor of the Dispatch: I send you herewith a role of the Goochland Light Dragoons, late Company F, 4th Virginia Cavalry, Wickham's Brigade, later Stuart's, Fitz. Lee's Division, Army of Northern Virginia. The troop left Goochland, Va., on May 9, 1861, and proceeded to Richmond, Va., and was quartered for the night in a new building on Franklin street, below the Exchange Hotel. I think the building was known later as Westcott's Hotel. The next day (the 10th) the troop marched to Ashland, and was quartered in the Methodist church. It was mustered into the service of Virginia by Colonel Richard Ewell. It remained at Ashland about ten days, and was then ordered to Manassas, and on its arrival there marched to Fairfax Station, on the Orange & Alexandria Railroad, and went into camp to await the coming of the Yankees, and to do picket duty on the outpost. The next morning early a cour
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A horror of the war. [from the Richmond, Va., times, March 14, 1897.] (search)
en prisoners, had been made the victims of the implacable ferocity of General George A. Custer, of Sheridan's cavalry. A committee was appointed to raise funds for the erection of a monument to these soldiers, and their appeal is published below. The story of this tragedy is thus told in the Warrenton True Index, by an eye-witness: After the defeat of General Early at the battle of Opequon, on September 19, 1864, his command fell back up the Valley. The brigade of cavalry, under General Wickham, occupied a strong position at Milford, twelve miles south of Front Royal, and Custer made repeated efforts to force him from the position, without effect. About this time it was reported to Captain Chapman, of Mosby's command, that a large wagon train was en route from Milford to Winchester, under the escort of a small body of men. He immediately made disposition for its capture at Front Royal. For this purpose he divided his men into parties. One party was to attack the train at t
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