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y. General Johnston wrote as follows to his wife, from Vallecito: Vallecito, 180 miles to Yuma, Sunday, June 30, 1861. I received your letter of June 25th by Major Armistead, who arrived here this morning. Our party is now as large as need be desired for safety or convenience in traveling. Eight resigned army-officers and twenty-five citizens. They are good men and well armed. Late of the army we have Major Armistead, Lieutenants Hardcastle, Brewer, Riley, Shaaf, Mallory, and Wickliffe. Of the eight, four fell in battle-Johnston, Armistead, Mallory, and Brewer, These young gentlemen, though accustomed to a life of comparative ease, rough it as well as the best of them; wash, cook, pack, and harness animals, etc. The party is well armed, and, by observing a good compact order of march and vigilance in camp, we will be free from any danger of attack from Indians. I think there is no need of apprehension of molestation on the part of the authorities, civil or military,
s, Kentucky, September 26, 1861. The following officers are announced as the personal and departmental staff of General Albert S. Johnston, commanding, viz.: personal staff.-Aide-de-Camp: R. P. Hunt, lieutenant C. S. Army. Volunteer Aides: Colonels Robert W. Johnson, Thomas C. Reynolds, Samuel Tate; Majors George T. Howard, D. M. Haydon, and Edward W. Munford. Department of Orders.-Assistant Adjutant-Generals: Lieutenant-Colonel W. W. Mackall, Captain H. P. Brewster, First-Lieutenant N. Wickliffe (acting). Quartermaster's Department.-Principal Quartermaster: Major Albert J. Smith. Commissary Department.-Principal Commissary: Captain Thomas K. Jackson. Engineer's Corps.-First-Lieutenant Joseph Dixon. By command of General A. S. Johnston. W. W. Mackall, Assistant Adjutant-General. The appointments of volunteer aides were made chiefly to secure intelligent advice on the political affairs of the department, each State of which was represented on the st
warfare — audacity, wariness, enterprise, and unfailing resources. Morgan lost his life in the war, and his friend and comrade became his biographer. Duke's Life of Morgan, without any attempt at art, has the rare merit of combining truth and picturesqueness in narration. It is the work of an intelligent soldier and an honest gentleman. When Bramlette invaded Lexington, Morgan secured his arms and got away with his company on the 20th of September. He was joined at Bardstown by Captain Wickliffe's company, and they reached Buckner in safety on the 30th of September. Morgan was soon put in command of a squadron, composed of his own company, Captain Bowles's, and Captain Allen's, and did excellent service on outpost duty, getting here the training that afterward made him famous. It has already been mentioned that seven regiments of Kentucky infantry were recruited at Bowling Green during the autumn of 1861, though some of them were feeble in numbers. To carry out General J
West Tennessee is menaced by heavy forces. My advance will be opposite Decatur on Sunday. (Signed) A. S. Johnston, General C. S. A. To President Davis, Richmond. Richmond, Virginia, March 12, 1862. my dear General: The departure of Captain Wickliffe offers an opportunity, of which I avail myself, to write you an unofficial letter. We have suffered great anxiety because of recent events in Kentucky and Tennessee; and I have been not a little disturbed by the repetitions of reflections u seek may be attained. With the confidence and regard of many years, I am very truly your friend, Jefferson Davis. Decatur, Alabama, March 18, 1862. my dear General: I received the dispatches from Richmond, with your private letter by Captain Wickliffe, three days since; but the pressure of affairs and the necessity of getting my command across the Tennessee prevented me from sending you an earlier reply. I anticipated all that you tell as to the censures which the fall of Fort Donels
Van Dorn. The Comte de Paris, in his history of the war, vol. i., page 557, attributes this delay to hesitation; but there was no hesitation. The work of organization and armament was unavoidable and imperious. The attack was ordered within two hours after Buell's advance was reported. This work of reorganization and armament first engaged General Johnston's attention. His personal staff was now constituted as follows: Colonel H. P. Brewster, assistant adjutant-general. Captain N. Wickliffe, assistant adjutant-general. Captain Theodore O'Hara, assistant inspector-general. Lieutenant George W. Baylor, aide-de-camp. Lieutenant Thomas M. Jack, aide-de-camp. Major Albert J. Smith, assistant quartermaster-general. Captain Wickham, assistant quartermaster-general. Colonel William Preston, volunteer aide-de-camp. Major D. M. Hayden, volunteer aide-de-camp. Major Edward W. Munford, volunteer aide-de-camp. Major Calhoun Benham, volunteer aide-de-camp. For
gns of impatience. I was again sent back to know of Bragg why the column on his left was not yet in position. I received identically the same answer he had given earlier in the morning. At last half-past 12 o'clock came, and no appearance of the missing column, nor any report from Bragg. General Johnston, looking first at his watch, then glancing at the position of the sun, exclaimed, This is perfectly puerile! This is not war!-Let us have our horses. He, Major Albert Smith, Captain Nathaniel Wickliffe, and myself, rode to the rear until we found the missing column standing stock-still, with its head some distance out in an open field. General Polk's reserves were ahead of it, with their wagons and artillery blocking up the road. General Johnston ordered them to clear the road, and the missing column to move forward. There was much chaffering among those implicated as to who should bear the blame. It was charged on General Polk; but the plucky old bishop unhorsed his accuser
by officers and men in the twenty hours of battle, is impossible at this time; but their names will be duly made known to their countrymen. The immediate staff of the lamented commander-in-chief, who accompanied him to the field, rendered efficient service, and, either by his side, or in carrying his orders, shared his exposures to the casualties of a well-contested battle-field. I beg to commend their names to the notice of the War Department, namely: of Captains H. P. Brewster and N. Wickliffe, of the Adjutant and Inspector- General's Department. Captain Theodore O'Hara, acting inspector-general. Lieutenants George Baylor and Thomas M. Jack, aides-de-camp. Volunteer Aides-de-Camp Colonel William Preston, Major D. M. Hayden, E. W. Munford, and Calhoun Benham. Major Albert J. Smith and Captain Wickham, Quartermaster's Department. To these gentlemen was assigned the last sad duty of accompanying the remains of their lamented chief from the field, except Captains
Throckmorton. He then reported, with Majors Benham and Hayden, and Lieutenant Jack, to General Beauregard, who courteously offered them places on his staff, which were accepted, for that battle. After consultation with General Beauregard, and learning at headquarters that the victory was as complete as it probably would be, and that no attack was apprehended, the staff determined to accompany General Johnston's remains to New Orleans. Preston, Munford, O'Hara, Benham, Hayden, Jack, and Wickliffe, composed this escort. There was no cannonade, and no idea of a general engagement, when they left headquarters at 6 A. M. on Monday morning. But at eight o'clock, between Mickey's and Monterey, they were embarrassed by a stampede occasioned by five horsemen-one, of considerable rank. At Corinth they found the soldiers straggling through the woods, shooting squirrels. They learned, before they left that night, that Beauregard had retired. On arriving in New Orleans, General Johnston
rence S. Ross. Small commands were stationed at the military posts of Cahaba, under Col. H. C. Davis; Columbus, under General Ruggles; Demopolis, under Col. Nathaniel Wickliffe, and at Selma, under Col. T. H. Rosser. In this statement the command which Forrest was organizing at Cosmo is not included. He had displayed great eneeely —Second brigade, Col. Robert McCulloch: First Mississippi Rangers (Seventh regiment later), Lieut.-Col. Samuel M. Hyams, Jr.; Fifth Mississippi, Lieut.--Col. Nathaniel Wickliffe; Second Missouri; Crew's Tennessee battalion; Willis' Texas battalion; Hudson's Mississippi battery, Lieut. E. S. Walton—Sixth brigade, Col. Edmund WCol. Marshall T. Polk; Brandon, Capt. Wm. R. Spears; Canton, Capt. John N. Archer; Columbus, Col. Levi McCullum; Enterprise, Maj. M. S. Ward; Grenada, Lieut.-Col. Nathaniel Wickliffe; Jackson, Lieut.-Col. Archibald Macfarlane; Macon, Maj. Bell G. Bidwell; Meridian, Lieut.-Col. G. W. Law; Okolona, Maj. E. G. Wheeler; Oxford, Capt.
hard. --"Ore," the correspondent of the Mobile Advertiser and Herald, says that Charles A. Wicktirfe, the Union M. C. of Kentucky has been totally deserted by his family and relatives. One of his sons, Colonel Cripps Wickliffe, commands the 5th Kentucky in the Confederate army. Another son, Bob Wicktiffe, ex-Governor of is with us, and two nephews also joined our standard--one, Colonel Charles Wickliffe, of the 7th Kentucky, who was killed at Shiloh in one of the most gallant charges of that battle, and whose conspicuous heroism and bravery have never yet been done justice to — and the other, Capt. Nat. Wickliffe, who was aid to the lamented Gen, A. Sidney Johnston, and who is still in the service. Even the wife of this poor, demented old man has declared that she could not side with him, and she would never again cross the Ohio; and both of his daughters, Mrs. Judge Merrick, formerly of Washington, D. C., and Mrs. Senator of Florida, have also left him alone in his shame