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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), May 2-9, 1862.-expedition from Trenton to Paris and Dresden, Tenn., with skirmish, May 5, near Lockridge's Mill. (search)
e not necessary to relate. I got all her news, and then her negro boy William was even more confidential toward a supposed Abolitionist. I saw that my plans were thus frustrated beyond a doubt, in which opinion Colonel Jackson agreed, as did Major Wicks. I then determined to pursue Major Shaeffer and catch him at any rate. I accordingly waited a sufficient time to let him satisfy himself I was going to Dresden, and I took a by-road through Palmersville to cut the Dresden road to Boydsville.Colonel Jackson was, as usual with him, such as to merit your highest approval, and the good conduct of his regiment on the march and in the affair excellent. Regretting the impossibility of getting to Paducah, in which Colonel Jackson and Major Wicks agree with me, I hope to have your approval of my course. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, th. Claiborne. No. 2.-report of Col. William W. Lowe, Fifth Iowa Cavalry. headquarters, Forts Henry and Heiman, May 12, 1862.
early upright in the bath while the chemical changes take place. Dip′ping. 1. The process of brightening ornamental brass-work. a. The grease is removed by heat or lye. b. The work is pickled in dilute aquafortis. c. Scoured with sand and water. d. Washed. e. Dipped in a bath of pure nitrous acid for an instant. f. Washed. g. Rubbed with beech sawdust. h. Burnished. i. Lacquered. 2. Plunging sheet-iron plates in the pickle or the tin-bath in tinning. 3. Wicks in the tallow-vat. 4. The wool or fabric in the dye-tub. 5. The paper form in the pulp. And so on of various operations in the arts, mechanic and fine. 6. The Scotch term for the dubbing of American and English curriers. It consists of boiled-oil, fishoil, and tallow. 7. (Photography.) Immersing the collodionized plate in a sensitizing bath. Dip′ping-frame. 1. A frame from which candle-wicks are suspended while dipping into the vat of melted tallow. See candle.
stove. One in which the heat is obtained by the burning of oil in wicks beneath the kettle, oven, or what not. Lamp-wick. The capillary or foraminous material which conducts oil or grease to the part where it is consumed in the flame. Wicks are usually of woven fiber, — cotton, for instance, — but have been made of muslin, paper-pulp, asbestus, biscuit of fire-clay, etc. The tubular lamp-wick was made for the Argand lamp, to admit air to the inside of the flame as well as the outside. Wicks are also made flat, to admit air to each side of a flat, comparatively thin flame. The tubular wick for candles, in imitation of the wick of the Argand lamp, has been patented six times in England. Candle-wicks are also made flat; double, with space between, to bend out in burning; wick woven or wound spirally; plaited wire enclosed in longitudinal threads; woven with asbestus; parallel threads laid longitudinally; wicks coated with various materials, such as resin, stearic aci
or of half that sum was rich. The exports were land productions—wheat, lumber, tobacco—and peltry from the Indians. In the community, composed essentially of farmers, great equality of condition prevailed; there were but few merchants, few servants, and very few slaves. What was wanting to the happiness of the people? Prompted by an exalted instinct, they demanded power to govern themselves. Discontent created a popular 1681 Wood 99 convention; and if the two Platts, Titus, Wood, and Wicks of Huntington, arbitrarily summoned to New York, were still more arbitrarily thrown into prison, the fixed purpose of the yeomanry remained unshaken. The government of New York was quietly maintained over the settlements south and west of the Delaware, till they were granted to Penn; over the Jerseys Andros claimed a paramount authority. We Chap. XVII.} 1675. have seen the Quakers refer the contest for decision to an English commission. In East New Jersey, Philip Carteret had, as th
Arrests. --A man named Turner, while in an inebriated condition, made an assault upon watchman Wicks on Saturday night, for which he was taken into custody. The Mayor will dispose of the case. A negro named John, slave of T. & S. Hardgrove, is under arrest for stealing a shawl, valued at $15, from the residence of Mrs. C. James.
Recaptured. --A man named Wm. Booth, who recently escaped from the Chain-Gang, was arrested by watchman Wicks on Tuesday night. The Mayor, yesterday, remanded him to his old quarters.
Arrived. Steamship Roanoke, Couch, New York, mdze. and passengers, Ludlam & Watson. Sailed, Steamship City of Richmond. Mitchell, Philadelphia, mdze. and passengers, C. P. Cardozo. Steamer Belvidere, Keene, Baltimore, mdze., and passengers. D. & W Currie. Schr. Marshall, Chichester, New York, mdze., D. & W Currie. Schr. Wm. Godfrey, Wicks, down the river, light.
Absent, but not forgotten. --The Mayor received yesterday a note from the Superintendent of city fortifications, near Fairfield, stating that one hundred and fifty of the free negroes sent thither to labor had deserted and failed to answer at roll-call. This conduct may necessitate the adoption of more stringent regulations in regard to them. One follow, Seaton Anderson by name, left the works two hours after being brought thither by Mr. Wicks, a policeman.
Ranaway --twenty Dollars Reward.--Ranaway, on the 1st instant, a negro man named John Fisher. He is about 30 years old; slightly bald; black color; had on drab coat and pants, and a straw hat. He is from near Harper's Ferry; formerly belonged to Michael Tearney; has a wife in said neighborhood. I will give the above reward for his delivery to me, or placed in Jail, so I get him. N. M. Lee, Agent for de 3--tf Greenlaw & Wicks.
Ranaway. --twenty Dollars Reward.--Ranaway, on the 1st instant, a negro man named John Fisher. He is about 30 years old; slightly bald; black color; had on drab coat and pants, and a straw hat. He is from near Harper's Ferry, formerly belonged to Michael Tearney; has a wife in said neighborhood. I will give the above reward for his delivery to me, or placed in Jail, so I get him. N. M. Lee, Agent for Greenlaw & Wicks. de 3--tf
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