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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 13 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 11 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 9 5 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 8 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 6 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 5 1 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 4 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address before the Mecklenburg (N. C.) Historical Society. (search)
y Island and Baltimore, and in these, on the American side, none but Southern troops were engaged. This war was unpopular at the North, and the defection of New England amounted almost to overt treason. Hence, the South furnished again more than her proportion of troops. Again, the Southern volunteers flocked North, while no Northern troops came South. If we read of the bloody battles in Canada, we are struck with the number of Southern officers there engaged, mostly general officers — Wilkinson, Izzard, Winder, Drayton, Hampton, Scott, Towson, Brooke, Gaines, &c. Kentucky, I believe, furnished more troops than any State for the invasion of Canada. On the authority of the Southern Review, I state, without investigating the truth of it, that Maryland furnished more of the naval heroes of the war of 1812 than did any other State in the Union. It is very certain that the South contributed more than her quota of land troops. Not only was the war popular at the South, but the labori
at the same number. On September 3, 1762, France ceded Louisiana to Spain. After this, though the seaports of Texas were closed by Spanish jealousy, the trade across the country between Mexico and Louisiana, possessions of the same power, gave some impulse to the settlement and growth of the country, though these again were retarded by the increased hostility of the Indians. In 1800 Philip Nolan, with twenty men, made an expedition into Texas, as is said, in the interests of Burr and Wilkinson. He claimed to be in search of horses. He was attacked by 150 Spaniards, who killed him and some of his men, and made prisoners of the others. Ellis Bean, the second in command, was held a prisoner eleven years. In 1800 Louisiana was restored by Spain to France, and in 1803 ceded by France to the United States. Under this cession the United States set up some claim to Texas, and the boundary-line itself between Texas and Louisiana was left undetermined. Hostilities seemed impendin
t trap it seems to be, observed one, very emphatically; we are outnumbered three to one in front: reports have come in of troops on the move from Alexandria and Washington. Yes, but then our army is advancing from Thoroughfare Gap. Are they? not at all! the Federals are strongly posted there, and hold it with many cannon! This announcement elicited a long whistle from many, while others buried their chagrin in cups of coffee and smoked in silence. Who told you? one ventured to ask. Wilkinson; he was sent off with orders, and could not get through — an entire division holds the place! Well, say no more about it, said a fat old major of foot; any thing for a change. I'd rather fight any time than be eternally marching; I suppose Jackson knows more about these things than we do-at all events, he puts a bold face upon matters, and instead of running away as a scarey general would, he plants himself firmly along their line of march and defies them! 'Tis evidently a fight or a fo
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death., Chapter 31: the Chinese-Wall blockade, abroad and at home. (search)
rning wheels, they would drop down the Cape Fear, at night, to within a hundred yards of the looming blockade giant. Then, putting on all steam, they would rush by him, trusting to speed and surprise to elude pursuit and distract his aimand ho! for the open sea. This was a service of keen excitement and constant danger; demanding clear heads and iron nerves. Both were forthcoming, especially from navy volunteers; and many were the hair-breadth ‘scapes that made the names of Maffit, Wilkinson and their confreres, household words among the rough sea-dogs of Wilmington. Savannah suffered least of the fair Atlantic sisterhood, from the blockade. The early capture of her .river forts blocked access to her wharves, almost effectually; though occasional steamers still slipped up to them. Yet, she was in such easy reach of her more open neighbors, as to reap part of the bad fruits with which they were so overstocked. These proud southern cities had ever been famed throughout
ously by the cook.which is fat pine. The schools were kept in log-cabins, and it was many years before we had a County Academy. Mississippi was a part of the territory ceded by Georgia to the United States. Its early history was marked by conflicts with the Spanish authorities, who had held possession, and who had a fort and garrison in Natchez. During the administration of President Adams a military force was sent down to take possession of the country. It was commanded by General Wilkinson, for whom the county in which we lived was named. He built a fort overlooking the Mississippi, and named it, in honor of the President, Fort Adams. There is still a village and river-landing by that name. My first tuition was in the usual log-cabin school-house; At this time Jefferson and his little sister Pollie used to take a basket of luncheon and walk to school. She was two years older than he, but he thought he must take care of her. There used to be a peripatetic chair-
e of the earlier times — to prescribe the lesson and whip any boy who did not know it. The path along which I travelled to the school-house passed by the residence of an old dominie who had a great contempt for Latin. Why, he never told me, nor could he have told me, as he knew nothing about it; but whenever he saw me walking along the path, he would shout out, grinningly, How are you getting along with you hic, haec, hoc? I had been there but a short time when the County Academy of Wilkinson was organized, and I returned home and went daily from my father's house to the school-house until I was sufficiently advanced to be sent to the college known as the Transylvania University of Kentucky. At the head of the County Academy was a scholarly man named John A. Shaw, from Boston. He took on himself, also, the duty of preaching every Sunday; but as there was no church, he held his meetings in the court-house. The boys of the Academy were required to attend, and very soon they
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 61: the Washington artillery of New Orleans. (search)
outh, N. C., when General Hoke captured that place in 1864. In August, 1864, the Atlanta cruised off the north coast of the United States in the neighborhood of New York and Boston, and Commander Wood captured over thirty of the enemy's vessels. For these services he received the thanks of the Confederate Congress, and was promoted to be Post Captain. Throughout all these hot encounters his piety and gentle consideration for others was conspicuous on every field. The gallant Captain Wilkinson's deeds pressed close upon those of his friend and brother-officer, and the world will not forget Commanders Semmes, Maffitt, Pegram, Maury, Loyal, Jones, and other naval heroes who are too rich in fame to need my mite. None fought more gallantly than Heros von Borcke, an Austrian officer of distinction, who came to offer his sword, and was assigned to J. E. B. Stuart's cavalry, and served with conspicuous bravery until severely wounded; he left the service with broken health. The
n is received with perfect contempt and indignation. The Union men openly denounce the Administration. The greatest possible unanimity prevails. There was great rejoicing there Saturday on the reception of the news of the reduction of Fort Sumter.--Tribune, April 16. Large Union meetings were held at Detroit, Mich., Westchester and Pittsburgh, Pa., Lawrence, Mass., and Dover, N. H. At Pittsburgh the meeting was opened by the Mayor, who introduced the venerable William Wilkinson. Mr. Wilkinson was made President of the meeting. About twenty-five Vice-Presidents were also appointed. Resolutions were adopted, declaring undying fealty to the Union, approving the course of the Legislative and Executive branches of the State Government in responding to the call of the President, disregarding all partisan feeling, and pledging their lives, fortunes, and sacred honor in the defence of the Union, and appointing a Committee of Public Safety. A resolution approving the action of th
o the people of the same, for their approval or rejection. A military execution occurred at Shepherd's Hill, near Centreville, Va. Two members of the New Orleans company, known as The tigers, were shot for mutinous conduct and an assault upon the officer of the day.--Richmond Examiner, December 9. Both Houses of Congress met at Washington. In the Senate Mr. Trumbull gave notice of a bill to confiscate the property of the rebels and give freedom to persons in the slave States. Mr. Wilkinson gave notice of a bill to abolish the distinction between regular and volunteer forces. In the house Mr. Maynard was, after some discussion, sworn in as a member from the second district of Tennessee. The question as to the right of Mr. Segar, of Va., to a seat was referred. Mr. Eliot offered a series of resolutions in favor of emancipating the slaves in the rebel districts. A motion to lay them on the table was lost by a vote of fifty-six to seventy, and the further consideration o
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 9: proceedings in Congress.--departure of conspirators. (search)
ty-three. The vote was as follows:--yeas, Messrs. Anthony, Baker, Bingham, Cameron, Chandler, Clark, Collamer, Dixon, Doolittle, Durkee, Fessenden, Foote, Foster, Grimes, Hale, Harlan, King, Seward, Simmons, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, and Wilson. NAYs, Messrs. Bayard, Bigler, Bragg, Bright, Clingman, Crittenden, Fitch, Green, Gwin, Hunter, Johnson of Tennessee, Kennedy, Lane of Oregon, Mason, Nicholson, Pearce, Polk, Powell, Pugh, Rice, Saulsbury, and Sebastian. The leadin, Mason, Nicholson, Polk, Pugh, Rice, Sebastian, Thompson, Wigfall--19. noes.--Messrs. Anthony, Bingham, Chandler, Clarke, Dixon, Doolittle, Durkie, Fessenden, Foote, Foster, Grimes, Harlan, King. Morrill, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull. Wade, Wilkinson, Wilson--20. It might have been carried had the conspirators retained their seats. The question was then taken in the Senate on a resolution of the House of Representatives, to amend the Constitution so as to prohibit forever any amendment of
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