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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 21: closing events of the War.--assassination of the President. (search)
pted to slay Mr. Seward, the Secretary of State, who was seriously ill at his house, in consequence ,of having been thrown from his carriage a few days before. Powell, or Payne, as his associates called him, went to the Secretary's house with the pretense that he was a messenger of the Minister's physician. When the porter refused him admittance, he rushed by him and up two flights of stairs to Mr. Seward's chamber, at the door of which he was met and resisted by the Secretary's son, Frederick William. Payne struck the younger Seward to the floor with the handle of his pistol, fracturing his skull and making him insensible. The Secretary's daughter was attracted to the room-door by the noise, when Payne rushed by her, sprang like a furious tiger upon the bed, and inflicted three severe wounds upon the neck and face of Mr. Seward, with a dagger, when an invalid soldier, named Robinson, who was in attendance as nurse, seized the assassin from behind. The feeble resistance offered b
Smith, Gen., E. Kirby, re-enforces Johnston at Bull's Run, 1.602; his invasion of Kentucky, 2.502; his movement on Cincinnati, 2.503; compelled to retreat, 2.505; surrender of, 3.580. Smith, Gen., Green Clay, drives Morgan out of Kentucky, 2.500. Smith, Gen. J. E., at the battle on Missionaries' Ridge, 3.167. Smith, Gen. M. L., at the battle of Chickasaw Bayou, 2.578; at the battle on Missionaries' Ridge, 3.167. Smith, Gen. T. K., in the Red River expedition, 3.253. Smith, Gen. William F., reconnaissance under toward Lewinsville, 2.135. Smith, Gen. W. S., driven back by Forrest from West Point and Okolona, 3.289. Somerset, Pegram driven from by Gillmore, 3.127. South Carolina, secession movements in, 1.46; action of the legislature of on the election of Lincoln, 1.50; characteristics of the politicians in, 1.91; early secession movements in, 1.92; power of politicians in, 1.95; incendiary appeals to the people of, 1.97; secession a foregone conclusion in, 1.99;
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, Chevalier Howe. (search)
sed from other European countries. The Huguenots, expelled by Louis XIV., went to Berlin in such numbers that they are supposed by Menzel to have modified the character of its inhabitants. The Salzburg refugees were welcomed in Prussia by Frederick William I., who had an official hanged for embezzling funds that were intended for their benefit. In 1770 Frederick the Great gave asylum to the Jesuits who had been expelled from every Catholic capital in Europe; and when the brothers Grimm and other professors were banished from Cassel for their liberalism, they were received and given positions by Frederick William IV. Why then should the Prussian government have interfered with Doctor Howe, after he had completed his philanthropic mission to the Polish refugees? Why was he not arrested in the Polish camp when he first arrived there? The futile and tyrannical character of this proceeding points directly to Metternich, who at that time might fairly be styled the Tiberius of Ger
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe, Chapter 5: poverty and sickness, 1840-1850. (search)
ong very comfortably. Our new house is pretty much as it was, but they say it will be finished in July. I expect to visit you next summer, as I shall deliver the Phi Beta Kappa oration at Dartmouth College; but whether wife and children come with me or not is not yet decided. Mrs. Stowe came on to the East with her husband and children during the following summer, and before her return made a trip through the White Mountains. In May, 1840, her second son was born and named Frederick William, after the sturdy Prussian king, for whom her husband cherished an unbounded admiration. Mrs. Stowe has said somewhere: So we go, dear reader, so long as we have a body and a soul. For worlds must mingle,--the great and the little, the solemn and the trivial, wreathing in and out like the grotesque carvings on a gothic shrine; only did we know it rightly, nothing is trivial, since the human soul, with its awful shadow, makes all things sacred. So in writing a biography it is impos
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 21: Germany.—October, 1839, to March, 1840.—Age, 28-29. (search)
f the corps diplomatiqueand the Ministers I know already; and I have been well received by the Crown Prince, and the Prince William, and their princesses. Frederick William III. was then King of Prussia. He was born Aug. 3, 1770, succeeded to the throne Nov. 16, 1797, and died June 7, 1840. The Crown Prince was his son, FredeFrederick William IV., who was born Oct. 15, 1795, and died at Sans-Souci, Potsdam, Jan. 2, 1861. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Maximilian, of Bavaria. Prince William, brother of Frederick William IV., and now Emperor of Germany, was born March 22, 1797, and succeeded on his brother's death to the throne. He married, in 1829, a dFrederick William IV., and now Emperor of Germany, was born March 22, 1797, and succeeded on his brother's death to the throne. He married, in 1829, a daughter of the Grand Duke Charles Frederick, of Saxe-Weimar. The Crown Prince, who seems bon garcon,inquired about our summers: he thought they must be magnificent. I told him I thought so, till I had been in Italy. He asked me if Boston were not an old city (une ville ancienne), three hundred years old. Two hundred, I said; but
smine Path, that of Hildreth, an elegant ornamented sarcophagus, surmounted by a cross. On Sweet-briar Path are the tomb and obelisk of George W. Coffin, bearing inscriptions to the Hon. Peleg Coffin, who died in 1805, and to his widow who died in 1838, at the age of 81. The monument of Andrews, an oblong-square sarcophagus, will be found on Hazel Path; and in the same neighborhood that of Hoffman, a cenotaph, with an inscription as follows: In memory of a beloved and only son. Frederick William, son of David and Mary Hoffman, of Baltimore, Maryland. His early piety, rare talents, great industry, gentle and graceful manners, endeared him to the aged and the young. His studies in Harvard University were terminated by sudden illness. Accompanied by his parents for Italy, he died at Lyons, France, on the 30th November, 1833, aged 17 years. Cheever. Swett. Z. B. Adams. Hildreth. George W. Coffin. Andrews. Hoffman. John Hooker Ashmun. His remains re
dren, and among them was Rev. Simon of Marblehead. Brattle, Thomas, m. Elizabeth, dau. of Capt. William and Elizabeth Tyng, and had Thomas, b.——, d. 5 Sept. 1657; Thomas, b. 20 June 1658; Elizabetherine d. 28 April 1752, a. 47, and he m. wid. Martha Allen of Boston, dau. of Thomas Fitch, Esq. William the f. grad. H. C. 1722, resided in the house which still bears his name on Brattle Street, ermore, dau. of Josiah Mason, 13 July 1805, and had Clementina, b. 12 Aug. 1805, d. young; Frederick William, b. Nov. 1806, d. young,; Sarah Russell Mason, b. 16 Dec. 1808, m. James Munroe, Jr , 8 Oc Josiah, b. 6 Sept. 1791; James Winthrop, b. 28 Ap. 1794; Walter Russell, b. 22 Feb. 1796; Frederick William, b. 4 July 1798, d. --Nov. 1800; Caroline, b. 13 Mar. 1801, m. Hiram Brooks 20 July 1828, est ex-member of Congress, and the oldest surviving graduate of Harvard College. Thompson, Rev. William, of Braintree, m. Ann, wid. of Simon Crosby, before 1646. 2. Henry, of Boston, a merchant,
s reported that Lieut.-gov. Tailer, in introducing him to Gov. Burnet, remarked, Here is a man who can whistle Greek. Mr. Bradstreet had several children, and among them was Rev. Simon of Marblehead. Brattle, Thomas, m. Elizabeth, dau. of Capt. William and Elizabeth Tyng, and had Thomas, b.——, d. 5 Sept. 1657; Thomas, b. 20 June 1658; Elizabeth, b. 30 Nov. 1660, m. Nathaniel Oliver, 3 Jan. 1676-7; William, b. 22 Nov. 1662; Katherine, b. 26 Sept. 1644, m. John Eyre 20 May 1680, and after his 1738; Lucy, bap. 30 Mar. 1740; Thomas, bap. 14 Feb. 1741-2; Elizabeth, bap. 8 May 1743. Only Katherine and Thomas survived to maturity. His w. Katherine d. 28 April 1752, a. 47, and he m. wid. Martha Allen of Boston, dau. of Thomas Fitch, Esq. William the f. grad. H. C. 1722, resided in the house which still bears his name on Brattle Street, and was successively physician, preacher, and lawyer, and was Attorney-general, 1736 and 1747. An inordinate love of popularity seems to have been on
8 May 1817; Edward, b. 17 Dec. 1819. Isaac the f. grad. II. C. 1798, was a lawyer in Weston, Register of Probate in Middlesex from 1817 to 1851, res. alternately at Weston and Cambridge, and d. 11 Mar. 1861. 6. Nathan, s. of Samuel of Waltham, a descendant from John of Watertown, b. 6 Dec. 1780 (according to the family record, or 1779, as Bond records it), settled early in Camb., m. Anna Livermore, dau. of Josiah Mason, 13 July 1805, and had Clementina, b. 12 Aug. 1805, d. young; Frederick William, b. Nov. 1806, d. young,; Sarah Russell Mason, b. 16 Dec. 1808, m. James Munroe, Jr , 8 Oct. 1834; Elijah, b. 1 Feb. 1811, m. Charlotte D. Endicott 5 Oct. 1837, a merchant in New York, where he d. 4 Dec. 1859; Mary Lois, b. 1 May 1813, m. Alexander H. Ramsay 8 Ap. 1835; Margaret, b. 1 April 1815, m. David Humphrey 15 Nov. 1837; Benjamin, b. 9 May 1817, d. young; Elbridge Gerry, b. 26 July 1819, m. Sarah P. Teele 24 Nov. 1842; Joseph Bradley Varnum, b. Aug. 1821, d. young; Josiah Mason,
Front and State streets, was Selectman five years, and performed other public services. He d. of paralysis 28 Mar. 1841; his w. Lydia d. 27 May 1791. 12. Josiah, s. of Josiah (9), m. Lois, dau. of Hubbard Russell, 18 July 1784, and had Anna Livermore, b. 16 Sept. 1784, m. Nathan Fiske 13 July 1805, and d. 12 Sept. 1861; Luke, b. 30 Nov. 1785; Sally Russell, b. 20 Ap. 1789, d. unm. Jan. 1814; Josiah, b. 6 Sept. 1791; James Winthrop, b. 28 Ap. 1794; Walter Russell, b. 22 Feb. 1796; Frederick William, b. 4 July 1798, d. --Nov. 1800; Caroline, b. 13 Mar. 1801, m. Hiram Brooks 20 July 1828, and d. 9 April 1858; Louisa, b. 31 Mar. 1804, d. unm. 3 Ap. 1850. Josiah the f. from an early period in life devoted himself to mercantile pursuits. He resided a few years on Governor's Island, and Boston proper, but soon returned, and res. first near West Boston Bridge, and afterwards at the N. W. corner of Harvard and Moore streets; was Selectman 1808, several years an Overseer of the Poor, an
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