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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 49 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 14 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 2 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Reports etc., of this campaign (search)
51Col Emerson Opdycke, One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio Infantry, of operations May 3-14. No. 52Lieut. Col. David H. Moore, One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio Infantry, of operations May 14-September 8. No. 53Brig. Gen. Thomas J. Wood, U. S. Army, commanding Third Division. No. 54Col. Charles T. Hotchkiss, Eighty-ninth Illinois Infantry, commanding First Brigade. No. 55Col. William H. Gibson, Forty-ninth Ohio Infantry, commanding First Brigade, of operations August 2. No. 56Lieut. Col. William D. Williams, Eighty-ninth Illinois Infantry. No. 57Lieut. Col. James M. Graham, Eighth Kansas Infantry, of operations June 28-September 8. No. 58Col. Frank Askew, Fifteenth Ohio Infantry. No. 59Lieut. Col. Samuel F. Gray, Forty-ninth Ohio Infantry. No. 60Lieut. Col. Ole C. Johnson, Fifteenth Wisconsin Infantry. No. 61Brig. Gen. William B. Hazen, U. S. Army, commanding Second Brigade, of operations May 3-August 17. No. 62Col. P. Sidney Post, Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry, commanding S
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
General McPherson watching the enemy on Kenesaw and working his left forward; General Thomas swinging, as it were, on a grand leftwheel, his left on Kenesaw, connecting with General McPherson, and General Schofield all the time working to the south and east, along the Sandtown road. On the 22d, as General Hooker had advanced his line, with General Schofield on his right, the enemy (Hood's corps with detachments from the others) suddenly sallied and attacked. The blow fell mostly on General Williams' division, of General Hooker's corps, and a brigade of General Hascall's division, of General Schofield's army. The ground was comparatively open, and although the enemy drove in the skirmish line and an advanced regiment of General Schofield sent out purposely to hold him in check until some preparations could be completed for his reception, yet when he reached our line of battle he received a terrible repulse, leaving his dead, wounded, and many prisoners in our hands. This is known
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 11 (search)
Hooker's corps, which had been acting as support to General Mc-Pherson, was shifted to the left of Howard's command, and Williams' division reached the position assigned him just in time to meet and repel a fierce attack of the enemy who was endeavorine by the advance of Palmer and Howard. About 11 a. m. General Butterfield's division, of Hooker's corps, supported by Williams' and Geary's, of the same command, attacked and carried a series of hills strongly occupied by the enemy on the eastern iving him, until Butterfield's and Williar is' divisions came up and relieved Geary's troops. Soon after the arrival of Williams, about 3 p. m., the column was again put in motion, Williams' division in advance, and, although heavily engaged, drove Williams' division in advance, and, although heavily engaged, drove the enemy steadily before it into his intrenchments. Our loss was heavy, but it is believed that the loss of the enemy was much greater. Shortly after 3 p. m. the head of Howard's column got within supporting distance of Hooker's corps, and Newton'
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
Colored Troops, temporarily attached to my staff, by the most direct route. This division (General Williams') arrived just in time. Stanley's left had been turned, and was being forced back. All ofnson's), however, was doing splendid execution, staying the enemy's progress, when a brigade of Williams' was deployed in its support. The advance of the enemy was then immediately and effectually ch was marched as rapidly as possible, its head of column reaching Pumpkin Vine Creek just as General Williams' division, of the Twentieth Corps, was passing. At 0.15 p. m. General Newton's head of colision was near my right flank. The next morning, June 20, General Hooker's left division. (Williams') was relieved by General Wood's division and one brigade of General Stanley's division. Durin in its front. About 5 p. m. the enemy made an assault on General Hooker's right division (General Williams'), and I was soon requested to relieve his left division (General Butterfield's) for a re-e
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 23 (search)
ered the loss of that good and brave officer, Lieut. Thomas M. Gunn, topographical engineer of the brigade, who was captured by the enemy while fearlessly in the discharge of his duty. We remained before the enemy, with heavy skirmishing, until the 17th, when the rebels fell back on their left, falling back so as to form a line almost at right angles with that part of his position not abandoned. We pursued him and went into line with the Second Brigade, of Wood's division, on our left and Williams' division on our right. Heavy works were again thrown up for defense. June 18, advanced, my skirmishers being the Ninety-ninth Ohio, under command of Captain Bope (both field officers being sick). This regiment advanced most gallantly, driving the enemy with great impetuosity, and taking position within 100 yards of the enemy's lines. It rained incessantly, and these brave men in their rifle-pits, some in water nearly waist deep, resisted suc. cessfully every effort made to dislodge them
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
y 20, the enemy retreated during the night previous, and this day, the 21st, and 22d were devoted to refitting the troops. Monday, 23d, started at 1 p. m. and proceeded by way of Saltpetre Cave to Gillem's Bridge, where we crossed the Etowah, third in order of march. Advanced three miles beyond the river and encamped at 11 p. m. May 24, marched to Burnt Hickory, second in order of march. May 25, took the road toward New Hope Church, crossing the bridge over Pumpkin Vine Creek, in rear of Williams' division, Twentieth Corps, my division leading the Fourth Corps. Advanced to the neighborhood of New Hope Church, but did not participate in the conflict, though Kimball's (First) brigade was formed on the left of the road in readiness for such an event. About night-fall the whole division was formed in line on the left of the road. May 26, reformed my lines and intrenched within eightyfive paces of the enemy's works; placed Goodspeed's battery (A, First Ohio) on the right of my line, r
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 58 (search)
the accompanying reports of regimental commanders. During the same time we have taken 301 prisoners, including 13 commissioned officers. The Twenty-fifth Illinois, Thirty-second Indiana, and Thirty-fifth Illinois having been relieved from duty before the close of the campaign, no reports were furnished by their commanding officers. To Col. Frank Askew, commanding Fifteenth Ohio Veteran Volunteers; Lieut. Col. Samuel F. Gray, commanding Forty-ninth Ohio Veteran Volunteers; Lieut. Col. William D. Williams, commanding Eighty-ninth Illinois Infantry; Col. Frank Erdelmeyer, commanding Thirty-second Indiana Infantry; Col. R. H. Nodine, commanding Twenty-fifth Illinois Infantry; Lieut. Col. W. P. Chandler, commanding Thirty-fifth Illinois Infantry; Lieut. Col. O. C. Johnson and Maj. George Wilson, commanding Fifteenth Wisconsin Infantry; Col. John A. Martin and Lieut. Col. James M. Graham. commanding Eighth Kansas Veteran Volunteer Infantry, all brave and competent officers, are due
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 60 (search)
No. 56. report of Lieut. Col. William D. Williams, Eighty-ninth Illinois Infantry. Hdqrs. Eighty-Ninth Illinois Infantry Vols., Near Atlanta, Ga, September 13, 1864. Sir: In obedience to orders, I have the honor to report the operations of the Eighty-ninth Regiment Illinois Infantry Volunteers from May 3 to September 9, 1864, embracing a period of more than four months, on a line of operations of more than 160 miles in length directly in the heart of the enemy's country. In obedience to orders from superior authority, the Eighty-ninth Regiment Illinois Infantry Volunteers, under the command of Col. Charles T. Hotchkiss, marched from McDonald's Station, on the East Tennessee railroad, in company with brigade, division, and corps, on Tuesday, May 3, 1864, at 12 m. Arrived at Catoosa Springs and encamped for the night. Marched again on May 7, and arrived at Tunnel Hill May 8; encamped for the night. May 9, moved forward to near RockLy Face Ridge, and took position in sup
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 83 (search)
hed the road at the foot of the hill, within fifty yards of the battery, but the main body appeared to be greatly disconcerted by the firing, and although their officers could be seen and heard trying to urge them forward, they very quickly put the hill between themselves and the pieces. They made one more endeavor to get over the hill more to our left, but were met in this attack at first by the fire of the battery with canister, and as they turned, by a volley from Robinson's brigade, of Williams' division, of General Hooker's corps, and who immediately charged and drove them clear over the hill out of sight in great confusion. On the following day (Sunday, the 15th) Battery B was placed in position within 400 yards of the enemy's rifle-pits, and partially enfilading them, where a constant fire of canister, spherical case, and shell was kept up. The Fifth Indiana was placed to the left of the other, and so as to make a cross-fire. From appearances the next day, it is believed that
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 100 (search)
remained, subject to the fire of the enemy's sharpshooters, until the morning of the 11th, when it was retired about a mile. On the morning of the 12th the regiment was ordered to march with the brigade to the right, and, after passing through Snake Creek Gap, bivouacked for the night some distance south of that point. Next morning the regiment with the balance of the brigade marched in the order of battle, skirmishing with the enemy until after dark, when the division was relieved by General Williams' division, of the Twentieth Army Corps, and retired a few hundred yards. About midnight the regiment was moved to the front again, the men resting on their arms until morning. On the morning of the 14th the brigade was divided into two lines, the Fifteenth in the second line covered by the Thirty-third Ohio. Skirmishing commenced early in the morning and continued very brisk, our lines advancing steadily until the enemy's skirmishers were driven with their main line into their works.
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