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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 11., Ye olde Meting-House of Meadford. (search)
y exprefsed in the vote as above said. Attest: Stephen Willis, Clerck. Referring to the former vote, we fio Thomas Willis John Whitmore John Bradshoe and Stephen Willis, Sixty Pounds, Currant money of N. E. for buil drawne by Left Peter Tufts, Insi. Francis and Stephen Willis, wherein the said Thomas Willis, John Whitmore, John Bradshoe and Stephen Willis doe couenant & Ingage in the building of a meeting-house according to the tio Thomas Willis, John Whitmore, John Bradshoe & Stephen Willis, sixty pounds for building the meeting-house. Senr., Caleb Brooks, Insi. Stephen Francis and Stephen Willis. The duties of no modern mayor or alderman couon John Whitmore were joyned to it, and also Sergt. Stephen Willis if his brother Thomas should be out of the w Peter Tufts and Jonathan Tufts the other two. Stephen Willis and John Francis had those opposite on the westname of Hall, three that of Whitmore, three more of Willis, two of Brooks, and one each of Bradshaw, Francis a
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 11., Ye olde Meting-House of Meadford. (search)
dent in the fact that, in the acts of worship and observation of times, everything was diametrically opposite. Even the Holy Scriptures were unread in the meeting-house, and not until 1755 was there a Bible upon the pulpit. No lights gleamed or candles flickered from its windows on Sunday night, for the Sabbath began at sunset on Saturday. One Medford man is credited with having a poor opinion of religion got by candle light. The records say of a town meeting, Adjourned to meet at Stephen Willis' on December 6 at about sunsetting. From twelve to fifteen shillings a year paid for the care of the house, and sometimes the deacon was the caretaker. The duties were sweeping, shutting the casements (possibly there were shutters on the windows, as glass was expensive), and removing the snow from before the doors. Since that day, thirty houses for public worship have been erected within the limits of Medford, and eighteen are now in use as such. Two of the thirty (the second and