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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 34. attack on Santa Rosa Island. October 9, 1861. (search)
returning, and all came back together. M. We set out, and before daylight were landed on Santa Rosa Island, among Billy Wilson's Zouaves, away below, and marched five miles, fighting several battles before we got off the island — losing several ne mass of smouldering ruins. The hospital structure is the only building now standing upon the Island of Santa Rosa. Wilson's New York Zouaves camp was the first one reached. The sentinels, completely surprised, were either killed or captured, ow over the head, which sent me rolling to the foot of the hill. We were in line again, and as friends were engaged with Wilson's Zouaves, and our misfortune had prevented the possibility of cutting off their retreat, we double quickened for those qey arrived there together, I suppose they will have to share the glory. As much fuss as the Northern papers have made of Wilson's Zouaves, and as proud as the United States is of such pets, I think them the most contemptibly cowardly wretches that e
ailure to join Lieut.-Col. Scott is attributable to these causes. On the receipt, however, of Lieut.-Col. Scott's message, he immediately ordered his cavalry and mounted men to the front, and took them forward at a rapid pace. On his arrival at Liberty, after dark, he found Scott there, after having been repulsed by the overwhelming numbers of the enemy. The men were exhausted, and as the enemy was reported strongly intrenched, it was resolved to postpone an attack until morning. Lieut.-Colonel Wilson reached Liberty with the infantry two hours after Col. Smith. Early on the following morning, the 18th, the combined forces moved forward, but on reaching Blue Mills Landing found that the rebels had crossed the river and eluded them, the last detachment having gone over at three o'clock in the morning. They had been two days in taking the baggage and stores across, and, with a ferry boat and three flats, found it comparatively easy to take their men over, especially as the Misso
ns of blood upon the ground. Where poor, gallant Armstrong was killed, there were eleven dead bodies. At the time of his death, he had a cap upon his sword waving it, rallying his men. My friend Captain Billy Jackson was shot in the hip while leading a portion of Russell's brigade. I think he will recover. I am afraid Jimmy Walker (James' son) will not recover. I think he is shot through the rectum. The day before the battle, Jackson, Major Butler, of the Eleventh Louisiana regiment, Wilson, of Watson's battery, Lieut. Ball, of same regiment, and Major Gus. Henry, and myself dined at Gen. Pillow's. Butler was shot through and died yesterday. Lieut. Ball was dangerously injured, and Henry had two horses shot under him. Jackson I have spoken of. I have given you but a poor account of what I saw, but I have not time to go more into details now, and I am out of kelter besides. You will see a full account in the papers of the fight. I wish the war would close. Such scenes as tha
ns of blood upon the ground. Where poor, gallant Armstrong was killed, there were eleven dead bodies. At the time of his death, he had a cap upon his sword waving it, rallying his men. My friend Captain Billy Jackson was shot in the hip while leading a portion of Russell's brigade. I think he will recover. I am afraid Jimmy Walker (James' son) will not recover. I think he is shot through the rectum. The day before the battle, Jackson, Major Butler, of the Eleventh Louisiana regiment, Wilson, of Watson's battery, Lieut. Ball, of same regiment, and Major Gus. Henry, and myself dined at Gen. Pillow's. Butler was shot through and died yesterday. Lieut. Ball was dangerously injured, and Henry had two horses shot under him. Jackson I have spoken of. I have given you but a poor account of what I saw, but I have not time to go more into details now, and I am out of kelter besides. You will see a full account in the papers of the fight. I wish the war would close. Such scenes as tha
enson, George Burton, H. D. Collins, William Hall, Martin Grimes, William N. Collins, Charles Dillin, (slightly,) and Lieut. John S. White, wounded. Company B, Captain Luman: one killed, three wounded. Killed.--William Hartley. Wounded.--William Hall, S. Browning, and Joseph Bailey. Company C, Captain Wiley: one wounded, Alfred Dougherty. Wounded of the Second Ohio, mostly belonging to Company A, Captain Berryhill: Captain Berryhill, David Hilt, Patrick Flaherty, John Elstrip, Haw. Wilson, Joseph Carter, Corporal E. B. Simpson, Corporal Fesh, Henry Giese, pioneer; Stephen A. Coleman, scout, all abed. John S. Bayless, Chaplain Col. Marshall's Regiment Ky. Vol. Gen. Nelson's order. Headquarters camp hopeless chase, Piketon, Ky., Nov. 10, 1861. soldiers: I thank you for what you have done. In a campaign of twenty days you have driven the rebels from Eastern Kentucky, and given repose to that portion of the State. You have made continual forced marches over wretche
sent means, I do not deem it advisable further to continue it, unless the enemy think it proper to do so, when I shall meet him with alacrity. The attack on Billy Wilson's camp, the attempted attack on my batteries, and the insult to our glorious flag, have been fully and fearfully avenged. I have no means of knowing the loss lmost hid from view by smoke; fortunately it overreached her, causing only a slight disfiguration of her railing. She fired from her little piece two shots at Billy Wilson's batteries, and proceeded on to the Florida camp. eleven O'clock A. M.--The Nelms has arrived at her wharf, and Capt. Keys reports the facts as above state we will probably learn more when Capt. Wingate comes up. The fleet, consisting of the Colorado and Niagara, it is thought, and a gunboat, have moved down from Wilson's camp to the mouth of the bar, and are, as well as we can discern, delivering broadsides at Fort McRae. Up to this hour, we had no messenger from the yard, save