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The Daily Dispatch: may 29, 1861., [Electronic resource], The character of the war before us. (search)
sness to commend such brutal acts as those recently perpetrated at St. Louis, where helpless, unoffending women and children were shot down, murdered in cold blood by the ruthless soldiery. Among the pet officers of the Northern army are, Billy Wilson, Daniel E. Sickles, Billy Mulligan, E Z. C. Judson, alias Ned Buntline, and others equally prominent and notorious for their deeds of villainy. Wilson is a rowdy of the most disgraceful stamp, the leader of a gang of roughs and thieves. At tWilson is a rowdy of the most disgraceful stamp, the leader of a gang of roughs and thieves. At the time of his appointment as Colonel of a regiment he was under heavy bonds to keep the peace. Daniel E. Sickles, who has been raised to the ranks of a General, and placed in command of a Brigade, is the notorious Sickles who murdered Philip Barton Key, because the guilty association of the latter with the wife of Sickles had been made public. There walks not the streets of New York a more unprincipled and abandoned rogue than this man Sickles — a man who has for years consorted with the vile
The Daily Dispatch: may 29, 1861., [Electronic resource], How a Minister's pocket was picked. (search)
How a Minister's pocket was picked. --A New York correspondent of a Sunday paper tells the following, which exhibits the character of Col. Wilson's regiment. It is too good to be lost: A good story is told of Ex-Alderman Billy Wilson's regiment of pickpockets and city vagabonds, who are now encamped on Staten Island. Ex-Alderman Billy Wilson's regiment of pickpockets and city vagabonds, who are now encamped on Staten Island. A patriotic clergyman got his congregation in Brooklyn to contribute quite a pile of money last Sunday, for the benefit of Wilson and his crowd. He waited upon the "Colonel" at the camp, made him a pretty speech, full of sympathy, explained the purpose of his visit, put his hand in his pocket to take out the gold — but it wasn't Wilson and his crowd. He waited upon the "Colonel" at the camp, made him a pretty speech, full of sympathy, explained the purpose of his visit, put his hand in his pocket to take out the gold — but it wasn't there! He felt in the other pocket — vanished!--"Never mind, Colonel," said our divine, "some of your boys have got it, its all the same." The fact being that the reverend gentleman's pocket was picked before he had been on the camp-ground five minutes. This story has leaked out slily, and makes a laugh he
espot, King Numbers, we would swear allegiance to the first without a moment's hesitation. We would rather any day be at the mercy of a king, though absolute and hereditary, who is himself under the influence of public opinion, and who could not, without fear of the vengeance of man here, and of God hereafter, commit any very flagrant outrage upon his subjects, than be the subject of a despotic majority, like that which now sways the Government of the United States, which is inaccessible to the swords as it is deaf to the remonstrances of those whom it has wronged and oppressed, which manufactures its own public opinion, and therefore cannot be reached morally any more than physically, and which has no sense of individual conscience and responsibility here or hereafter. In all the Northern States the ballot-box has been made as universal as the air, and the vote of Billy Wilson or any of his followers, might balance that of the greatest luminaries of learning and statesmanship.