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Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: Maryland under Federal military power. (search)
overnment at Annapolis. Governor Hicks, who, at the meet. ing in Monument Square in the afternoon of April 10th, prayed his God to wither his right arm if ever he raised it against a sister Southern State, against Virginia and the South, had not complied with President Lincoln's first call for troops, but Butler's guns and the Federal control of the city recovered him from the panic into which he had been precipitated by the paving stones of Pratt St., and on the 14th of May, the day of Ross Winans' arrest, he issued a proclamation calling for four-regiments of volunteers to serve for three months, within the limits of Maryland, or for the defense of the capital of the United States, and not to serve beyond the limits aforesaid. In consequence of the delay, the short term of service and the ridiculous terms proposed for enlistment, the government refused to accept the home guards, guaranteed never to leave the State except in case of invasion. On the 2d of May President Lincoln
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
venience. She left that just as it was, to the care of S. Teakle Willis, John Hanson Thomas, Ross Winans, John C. Brune, and the rest of the Baltimore Delegation in the legislature, which was in Freoffer resistance to the passage of the troops through the city, yet a resolution offered by Mr. Ross Winans was of a bold and somewhat threatening character. Arrival of recruits. A battery offor arms, and a number of muskets belonging to the State were seized. The works of the Messrs. Winans were engaged in making pikes, in casting balls for muskets and cannon and the steam gun which MrMr. Winans had invented. A centrifugal steam gun invented by Mr. Dickinson was purchased by the city to be used in the public defense. A party of young men took some field pieces from a military scho the city never sent the General Assembly before or since. It was composed of John C. Brune, Ross Winans, Henry M. Warfield, J. Hanson Thomas, T. Parkin Scott, H. M. Morfit, S. Teackle Wallis, Charl
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
e it was not determed to offer resistance to the passage of the troops through the city, yet a resolution offered by Mr. Ross Winans was of a bold and somewhat threatening character. Arrival of recruits. A battery of artillery and several hu There was a great rush for arms, and a number of muskets belonging to the State were seized. The works of the Messrs. Winans were engaged in making pikes, in casting balls for muskets and cannon and the steam gun which Mr. Winans had invented. AMr. Winans had invented. A centrifugal steam gun invented by Mr. Dickinson was purchased by the city to be used in the public defense. A party of young men took some field pieces from a military school at Catonsville and brought them to town, but the principal of the school was such a delegation as the city never sent the General Assembly before or since. It was composed of John C. Brune, Ross Winans, Henry M. Warfield, J. Hanson Thomas, T. Parkin Scott, H. M. Morfit, S. Teackle Wallis, Charles H. Pitts, William G. H
Liberality of Marylanders. Baltimore, April 20, P. M. --It is said that Ross Winans has purchased and presented to the Baltimore troops 7,000 Minnie rifles. Col. Lloyd, of the Eastern shore of Maryland, has subscribed $30,000, for the purchase of provisions for the troops now besieging Fort McHenry.
Arrest of a prominent citizen of Baltimore by Lincoln's Emissaries. Baltimore, May 15.--Ross Winans was arrested to-day, on a charge of selling the steam gun to the Virginians.
ome. One thousand Minnie muskets arrived last evening from North Carolina. Mary landers are constantly coming in, unarmed. Yesterday about forty of the members of the Maryland Legislature visited this place. The special object of this visit is not precisely known. Many supposed that they came here to protest against the seizure of the Maryland heights by the Virginia troops, but the political complexion of the delegation forbids such an inference. It may be worthy of notice that Ross Winans accompanied the delegation.--He believes that there will be no war of any consequence. A gentleman just from Chambersburg, Pa., says that the military force stationed there is somewhat in a state of disorganization; that the citizens are leaving the place from fear of the soldiers; and that picket guards are posted in every direction, to prevent a nocturnal surprise, of which they are painfully apprehensive. Last night 55 more beeves were seized.--There is now waiting the comman
Butler' s command and carried to Fort McHenry. The arrest of Mr. Winans, according to the Sun, was as follows : The special train o House.--While there an officer entered the cars, and approaching Mr. Winans, a member of the House of Delegates from this city, who was sittig with Mr. Brune on a front seat, courteously inquired if he were Mr. Winans--who having assented, the officer said he wished to speak to him, and told him he had an order for his arrest from General Butler. Mr. Winans, who is an aged man, was then assisted from the car and to the ofrs of the Legislature, who rushed forward to inquire the cause of Mr. Winans' arrest, were refused admittance. Gov. Hicks, who was on theated that he could get no satisfactory answer as to the reasons for Winans' arrest, and that all offers of security for his reappearance were declined; also that Mr. Winans would be taken good care of until his examination. Great excitement was exhibited by the members of the Legisl
Release of Ross Winans. --Mr. Winans, of Baltimore, who was arrested by order of the Lincoln administration a few days ago, was released on Thursday. The charge against him was treason, in having furnished material aid to Virginia. Release of Ross Winans. --Mr. Winans, of Baltimore, who was arrested by order of the Lincoln administration a few days ago, was released on Thursday. The charge against him was treason, in having furnished material aid to Virginia.
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.the true sentiment of Baltimore. Baltimore, May 17, 1861. Although hemmed in by the vandals of the North, our sympathy with the South, instead of diminishing, is steadily augmenting. The arrest of our worthy townsman, Ross Winans, Esq., which the Yankees had been spurred to do by the New York Tribune, has served to exasperate the people so greatly that, had he not been released yesterday, we would have had a more bloody day than the 19th of April, 1861. The so-called Union meeting, which no doubt the American represented as being most enthusiastic, was but an outburst of anger from the Yankee settlers of Maryland, who wish to place the sentiment of native Mary landers on the side of the North (Union). Yesterday evening the Michigan troops debarked from the depot at Bolton, part marching and part riding to the depot in freight cars. I noticed many of those marching arm in arm with great burly negroes. The old Maryland blood
Ross Winans. --The Baltimore Sun, after announcing the release of Mr. Winans from custody, says plainly that the seizure of that gentleman by an officer of the Army, without the issue of any civil process, and his detention in an armed court by a military power, is as gross, direct and palpable a violation of the Constitution as was ever committed in the whole history of this country. Ross Winans. --The Baltimore Sun, after announcing the release of Mr. Winans from custody, says plainly that the seizure of that gentleman by an officer of the Army, without the issue of any civil process, and his detention in an armed court by a military power, is as gross, direct and palpable a violation of the Constitution as was ever committed in the whole history of this country.
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