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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 8 0 Browse Search
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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 5: (search)
sgrace to Porson, and little to his publishers, are still an entire justification of all Schaffer had said in his preface . . . . Farewell. It is late, and I am tired, as I always am in a strange place, if it be only from seeing unwonted objects and faces. Still your Yankee friend, Geo. Journal. September 22.—In the afternoon we went through the gallery of pictures which has made Dresden so famous through the world; and, though I had read the admiration of Lessing, Herder, and Winckelmann, it surpassed my expectations. From looking at a collection of above thirteen hundred pieces an hour or two, I cannot of course say anything; but of the effect of one piece on my unpractised eye I cannot choose but speak, for I would not willingly lose the recollection of what I now feel. I mean the picture called the Madonna di San Sisto . . . I had often heard of the power of fine paintings, and I knew that Raphael was commonly reckoned the master of all imitation, and that this was o
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 7: (search)
such as Botta, De Breme, the Baron de Bonstetten, etc., have all told me it was to be seen best at Count Cicognara's. To him, therefore, they gave me letters, and I have found their predictions justified, and his acquaintance sufficient for my purposes, and for all the time I could give to society. He is a nobleman of fortune, President of the Academy of Fine Arts, and author of several considerable works, particularly a History of Modern Sculpture,—beginning at the third century, where Winckelmann leaves it,—in three folio volumes, of which the last is now in the press. He is about fifty years old, has a pleasant family, a wife accomplished and still beautiful, and assembles at his house the elegant, cultivated society there is in the city. Yesterday I dined with him, and every evening since I have been here 1 have passed in his coterie; for I find that when you once go to a party of this sort in Italy, it is expected you should continue your visits, if you like, as regularly as
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 8: (search)
s fine and touching. At the end, Niebuhr—who always reminded me of the Rev. Dr. Channing, a small man, with a great deal of soul in his face—went up to Bunsen, meaning to say some words of thanks. He held out both hands to him, and then he was completely overcome; he fell on his neck and wept loud, and I assure you there were not many dry eyes in the room. Journal. Of Frenchmen there are very few here now, and really the solemn grandeur of Roman greatness does not well suit them. Winckelmann says, in one of his curious letters to Berendis, A Frenchman is not to be improved here. Antiquity and he contradict one another; and since I have been here I have seen and felt a thousand proofs of the justness of the remark. . . . . Simond himself, though I think him in general a cool, impartial man, stands up a mere Frenchman as soon as you get him upon the subject of antiquities, of which he seems to have about as just notions as divines have of the world before the flood. Mazois,
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
. Wickham, Jr., 298. Wickham, William, 33. Wieck, Clara (Schumann), 474. Wiegel, 179. Wilberforce, William, 297. Wilde, Mr., 14. Wilkes, John, 55. Wilkes, Miss (Mrs. Jeffrey), 42. Wilkie, Sir, David, 421, 422, 425, 448. 449. William IV., King of England, 409. Williams, Friend, 337 note, 385. Williams, Miss, Helen Maria, 130, 132, 135, 138. Williams, Samuel, 297 and note. Willis, Mr., of Caius College, 436. Wilmot, Mr., 411. Wilson, John, 278 and note. Winckelmann, J. J., 178. Winder, General, 29. Wirt, William, 33, 351. Woburn Abbey, 269, 270. Wolf, F. A., 105-107, 112, 114, 124. Woodbury, L., 381. Woodward, Mrs., 4, 7, 273, 276. Woodward, Professor, 6. Woodward, William H., 4, 7, 250. Wordsworth, Miss, 287, 432. Wordsworth, Mrs., 287, 432. Wordsworth, William, 287, 288, 411, 432-434. Wortley, Hon., Stuart, 408 note. Wyse, 183 note. Y York, England, 272; Musical Festival in, 435-437. Yorke, Colonel, Richard, 442. Z Zach
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 3: (search)
ke all such soirees, agreeable in proportion as you fall in with agreeable people. To me it was pleasant because I made a good many interesting acquaintances. December 9.—To-day there was a great fete and dinner in honor of the birthday of Winckelmann, held at the Villa Albani, under the auspices and presidency of Bunsen. He had invited me to it, when I was still in Florence, and he called to-day and took me out in his carriage. The villa is neglected, but its palazzo, a fine building, is well preserved; the collection of antiques—stolen, literally stolen by the French—has been replaced, and the whole is much in the state in which it was when Winckelmann lived there, under the patronage of the well-known Cardinal Albani. Between three and four o'clock about ninety persons were collected, chiefly Germans, with a few English and Italian, and among them were the Russian Charge d'affaires; Kestner, the Hanoverian Minister; Thorwaldsen; Visconti; Dr. Carlyle, brother to the obscu<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
lkie, Sir, David, I. 421, 422, 425, 448, 449. Wilkinson, II. 155. Wilkinson, Sir, Gardiner, II. 371. William IV., King of England, I. 409. Williams, Friend, I. 337 note, 385. Williams, General, Sir William, II. 372. Williams, Miss, Helen Maria, I. 130, 132, 135, 138. Williams, Mr., Samuel, I. 297 and note. Willis, Mr., of Caius College, I. 436. Wilmot, Mr., I. 411. Wilson, II. 361. Wilson, John, I. 278 and note, II. 163, 164. Wilson, Professor, II. 155. Winckelmann, J. J., I. 178, II. 59. Winder, General, I. 29. Winsor, Justin, II. 318. Winthrop, Hon. Robert C., II. 263, 305, 470. Wirt, William, I 33, 351. Wiseman, Dr. (Cardinal), it. 73, 77, 80. Woburn Abbey, I. 269, 270, II. 466. Wolf. F. A., philologist, I. 105, 106, 107, 112, 114, 124. Wolf, Ferdinand, II. 2, 256 note, 260, 314; letter to, 274. Wolff, Emil, II. 58, 59, 84. Woodbury, L., T. 381. Woods' Hole, visits, II. 187, 196. Woodward, Mrs., I 4, 7, 273, 276. Wo