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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 15: Confederate losses — strength of the Confederate Armies--casualties in Confederate regiments — list of Confederate Generals killed — losses in the Confederate Navy. (search)
June 8, 1862.             15th Alabama Trimble's Ewell's 9 37 5 51 16th Mississippi Trimble's Ewell's 6 28 -- 34 Port Republic, Va.             June 9, 1862.             7th Louisiana Taylor's Ewell's 8 115 -- 123 5th Virginia Winder's Jackson's 4 89 20 113 31st Virginia Elzey's Ewell's 15 79 4 98 52d Virginia Stewart's Ewell's 12 65 -- 77 6th Louisiana Taylor's Ewell's 11 55 -- 66 44th Virginia Stewart's Ewell's 14 35 -- 49 Secessionville, S. C.             ly wounded. Killed at Shiloh. Brigadier-General Robert Hatton Killed at Fair Oaks. Brigadier-General Turner Ashby Killed at Harrisonburg. Brigadier-General Richard Griffith Mortally wounded. Killed at Savage Station. Brigadier-General Charles S. Winder Killed at Cedar Mountain. Brigadier-General Samuel Garland, Jr Killed at South Mountain. Brigadier-General George B. Anderson Mortally wounded. Killed at Antietam. Brigadier-General L. O'B. Branch Kille
ed sad havoc with them, driving decimated regiment after regiment back into the shelter of the dense forest, to have their places instantly occupied by fresh regiments, to be decimated in the same way. Among others this fire killed the rebel Generals Winder and Trimble. The arm of the former was torn off by a shell, and he died very shortly afterward from the flow of blood, and Trimble was knocked dead from his horse by the explosion of a shell. Having put the forces of McDowell and Sigel iBanks's, McDowell's, and Sigel's commands. We have over four hundred prisoners, including Brig.-Gen. Prince. While our list of killed is less than that of the enemy, yet we have to mourn the loss of some of our best officers and men. Brig.-Gen. Charles S. Winder was mortally wounded while ably discharging his duty at the head of his command, which was the advance of the left wing of the army. We have collected about one thousand five hundred small arms, and other ordnance stores. I am, Colon
the wonder of the war. These charges developed the fact that the enemy actually engaged greatly outnumbered our forces, about seven thousand, in action. Being thus informed of the location of the main body of the rebel infantry, our artillery played sad havoc with them, driving decimated regiment after regiment back into the shelter of the dense forest, to have their places instantly occupied by fresh regiments, to be decimated in the same way. Among others this fire killed the rebel Generals Winder and Trimble. The arm of the former was torn off by a shell, and he died very shortly afterward from the flow of blood, and Trimble was knocked dead from his horse by the explosion of a shell. Having put the forces of McDowell and Sigel in rapid motion for the field of action, Gen. Pope, with his staff, accompanied by General McDowell and his staff, immediately proceeded together from their headquarters to the front. As they passed Ricketts's division, and the head of Sigel's army c
12--6 1/2 P. M. Colonel: On the evening of the ninth instant, God blessed our arms with another victory. The battle was near Cedar Run, about six miles from Culpeper Court-House. The enemy, according to the statement of prisoners, consisted of Banks's, McDowell's, and Sigel's commands. We have over four hundred prisoners, including Brig.-Gen. Prince. While our list of killed is less than that of the enemy, yet we have to mourn the loss of some of our best officers and men. Brig.-Gen. Charles S. Winder was mortally wounded while ably discharging his duty at the head of his command, which was the advance of the left wing of the army. We have collected about one thousand five hundred small arms, and other ordnance stores. I am, Colonel, your obedient servant. T. J. Jackson, Major-General. Col. R. H. Chilton, A. A.G. Richmond Enquirer account. An intelligent correspondent sends us the following, dated on the battle-field, Sunday morning, August tenth, three A. M.: Gen.
lel to the road, supporting the batteries; and Winder's own brigade, under Colonel Roland, in reservr about two hours, during which Brigadier-General Charles S. Winder, while directing the movements s brigade, however, firmly held its ground. Winder's brigade, with Branch's, of A. P. Hill's divi Virginia,Winder's,Jackson's,178 4th Virginia,Winder's,Jackson's,369 5th Virginia,Winder's,JacksonWinder's,Jackson's,32023 27th Virginia,Winder's,Jackson's,3 3 33d Virginia,Winder's,Jackson's, 1515 Batteries,WinWinder's,Jackson's, 1515 Batteries,Winder's,Jackson's, 33 21st Virginia,Jones's,Jackson's,3785122 42d Virginia,Jones's,Jackson's,3671107Winder's,Jackson's, 33 21st Virginia,Jones's,Jackson's,3785122 42d Virginia,Jones's,Jackson's,3671107 48th Virginia,Jones's,Jackson's,184462 1st Virginia battalion,Jones's,Jackson's, 1010 10th Virgiirginia,Winder's,Jackson's,47377 4th Virginia,Winder's,Jackson's,197897 5th Virginia,Winder's,Jackson's,1491105 27th Virginia,Winder's,Jackson's,42327 33d Virginia,Winder's,Jackson's,2481105 BattWinder's,Jackson's,2481105 Batteries,Winder's,Jackson's,224 1st Virginia Battalion,Jones's,Jackson's,31922 21st Virginia,Jones's,[7 more...
equal to that of the enemy. In the mean time, Winder being now reenforced by the Seventh Louisiana which was carried off by the enemy. Whilst Winder's command was in this critical condition, the with Taylor, halted his advance to the front. Winder made a renewed effort to rally his command, annd the battle-field by Generals Taliaferro and Winder with their brigades and portions of the batteretailed, and fought on the left flank with General Winder. Colonel Scott reports: I particularly committed. I am, sir, very respectfully, Charles S. Winder, Brigadier-General Commanding. Repor reached their position on our left flank, General Winder's brigade was driven back, and the Fifty-s in that direction, expecting to meet with General Winder or some of his aids. At all events, I wasth Lieutenant Garnett, and soon after with General Winder and General Jackson. Orders now came in aiments of infantry. I immediately sent to General Winder a report of my position, and at the same t[14 more...]
Hill's infantry, in which the troops of General C. S. Winder joined, the enemy yielded the field andit the expected attack of the enemy. Brigadier-General Winder, occupying the road to Grapevine Brid regiment was advancing, I was met by Brigadier-General Winder, who suggested that the height might he remainder toward the route indicated by General Winder. The darkness and confusion made it diffibrief interview with General Whiting, Brigadier-General Winder met me, and said his brigade was comick, as I had suggested to Generals Whiting and Winder, and led these regiments across the road into my action. I then went on, and found Brigadier-General Winder, and by his order took possession of uesday, the first day of July, by order of General Winder, I had placed my regiment in the woods in ld were words of encouragement to his men. General Winder ordered me to move back some distance, and Upon our coming up to the First brigade, General Winder, ordered me to form the battalion in line [26 more...]
upon the Federal batteries. By this time, General Winder, with Jackson's division, had arrived, andnt, Branch's brigade, of Hill's division, with Winder's brigade farther to the left, met the Federal other caissons and a limber; three colors, by Winder's brigade, one being from the Fifth Connecticuar Run, on Saturday, the ninth, Brigadier-General Charles S. Winder was mortally wounded; whereuponthen engaging our batteries on the right. General Winder was in the front, directing, with great abnced several of them. Shortly after this, General Winder was mortally wounded and borne from the fiilled and fifty-one wounded. This includes General Winder; and in his death the brigade was deprived. This was the last order I received from General Winder, whose untimely death none more deplore thP. M., when I was notified of the death of General Winder, commanding the First division, and that y of our troops was the division of Brigadier-General C. S. Winder, and its artillery became first en[6 more...]
mong the losses was Colonel Baylor, commanding Winder's brigade, who fell in front of his brigade, w upon the Sharpsburg and Hagerstown turnpikes; Winder's and Jones's brigades being in front, and Talnder's,Jackson's,22628 Twenty-seventh VirginiaWinder's,Jackson's,358 Thirty-third VirginiaWinder'sWinder's,Jackson's,31619 BatteriesWinder's,Jackson's, 99 Twenty-third VirginiaTaliaferro's,Jackson's,83543Winder's,Jackson's, 99 Twenty-third VirginiaTaliaferro's,Jackson's,83543 Forty-seventh VirginiaTaliaferro's,Jackson's,63036 Forty-eighth VirginiaTaliaferro's,Jackson's,53division.killed.wounded.total. Fourth VirginiaWinder's,Jackson's,31417 Fifth VirginiaWinder's,JackWinder's,Jackson's, 55 Twenty-seventh VirginiaWinder's,Jackson's, 11 Carpenter's BatteryWinder's,Jackson's, 11 Winder's,Jackson's, 11 Carpenter's BatteryWinder's,Jackson's, 11    32124 Report of Major-General D. H. Hill. Headquarters division. General R. H. ChiltonWinder's,Jackson's, 11    32124 Report of Major-General D. H. Hill. Headquarters division. General R. H. Chilton, A. A. G.: General: I have the honor to report the operations of my command, from the battles ard be invidious to mention particular names. Winder's brigade was commanded successively by Colone[6
. 4 twelve Brigadier-generals Wm. Y. slack Pea Ridge March 8, 1862. Adley H. Gladden, Shiloh April 11, 1862. Robert Hatton, Fair Oaks June 1, 1862. Richard Griffith, Savage Station June 30, 1862. George B. Anderson, Antietam October 6, 1862. Lewis Henry little, Iuka September 19, 1862. O. B. Branch, Antietam September 17, 1862. Turner Ashby, Harrisburg June 6, 1862. William E. Starke, Antietam September 17, 1862. James McIntosh, Pea Ridge March 17, 1862. Charles S. Winder, Cedar Mountain, August 9, 1862. Samuel Garland, Jr., South Mountain September 14, 1862. Tabular statement of organizations in the Union service REGIMENTSBATTALIONSCOMPANIESBATTERIES Cavalry2724578 Heavy artillery61836 Light artillery9432 Engineers1317 Sharpshooters4335 Infantry2,14460351 Totals2,494126507432 Summary of organizations in the Confederate army Any attempt to present in statistical form the strength of the Confederate armies is manifestly impos
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