hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 9 9 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 4 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 2 2 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 2 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 29, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 45 results in 38 document sections:

1 2 3 4
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Chapter 13: Conclusion. (search)
as it happened under my own observation I was glad when the Captain took home with him this captive of his bow and spear to be educated under his eye in Massachusetts. Cyrus has done credit to his friends, and will be satisfied with nothing short of a college-training at Howard University. I have letters from the men, very quaint in handwriting and spelling; but he is the only one whom I have seen. Some time I hope to revisit those scenes, and shall feel, no doubt, like a: bewildered Rip Van Winkle who once wore uniform. We who served with the black troops have this peculiar satisfaction, that, whatever dignity or sacredness the memories of the war may have to others, they have more to us. In that contest all the ordinary ties of patriotism were the same, of course, to us as to the rest; they had no motives which we had not, as they have now no memories which are not also ours. But the peculiar privilege of associating with an outcast race, of training it to defend its rights,
tates from the Union effectually stopped all gayety, and made serious and thoughtful the most giddy devotee of society. Almost every one was so restless that he must needs be on the go all the time. Even the theatres were packed every night. The actors and actresses of that time were very fine. Forrest, Sothern, Joe Jefferson, Booth the elder, Charlotte Cushman, and other celebrated men and women were on the boards, Lord Dundreary furnishing recreation and amusement for the weary, Rip Van Winkle bringing tears from the sympathetic, while Charlotte Cushman's Queen Catherine and Meg Merrilies awakened the wildest enthusiasm for her great power in the rendition of such roles. In February she came to Washington to play for five nights: the first night giving Queen Catherine, supported by J. B. Studley, a fine actor; the second night in Meg Merrilies. When she delivered the curse upon poor Bertram, her figure seemed to rise to the stature of a giantess before her trembling, cringin
uth-Mountain, historic evermore, since a previous rebel invasion faded out thence to Antietam, loomed up on the left amid the morning mists before us stretched a winding turnpike, upheaved and bent about by a billowy country that in its cultivation and improvements began to give evidence of proximity to Pennsylvania farmers. The army had moved up the valley of the Monocacy through Walkersville, Woodbury, and Middleburgh — all pleasant little Maryland villages — where, in peaceful times, Rip Van Winkle might have slumbered undisturbed. The direction seemed too far north for Westminster, and a courier, coming back with despatches, presently informed us that headquarters were not there, but at Taneytown, a point considerably farther north and west. Evidently there was a change in our plans. We were not going to York, or headquarters would not be at Taneytown; and it was fair to suppose that our movements to the north-west were based upon news of a similar concentration by the rebels.
w him that Old Scott's a fool, We'll never submit to Yankee rule! Fight away, etc. At first our States were only seven, But now we number stars eleven; Fight away, etc. Brave old Missouri shall be ours, Despite old Lincoln's Northern powers I Fight away, etc. We have no ships, we have no navies, But mighty faith in the great Jeff. Davis; Fight away, etc. Due honor too we will award, To gallant Bragg and Beauregard! Fight away, etc. Abe's proclamation in a twinkle, Stirred up the blood of Rip Van Winkle; Fight away, etc. Jeff Davis' answer was short and curt “Fort Sumter's taken, and nobody's hurt! ” Fight away, etc. We hear the words of this same ditty, To the right and left of the Mississippi; Fight away, etc. In the land of flowers hot and sandy, From Delaware Bay to the Rio Grande! Fight away, etc. The ladies cheer with heart and hand, The men who fight for Dixie's land; Fight away, etc. The “Stars and Bars” are waving o'er us, And Independence is before us! Fight away, etc. Marti
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Darley, Felix Octavius Carr, 1822-1888 (search)
ter; born in Philadelphia June 23, 1822; evinced a taste for drawing at an early age, and while a lad in a mercantile house spent his leisure time in sketching. For some of these he was offered a handsome sum, and this induced him to choose art as a life pursuit. He spent several years in Philadelphia, always living by his pencil, and in 1848 he went to New York, where he made admirable illustrations for some of Irving's humorous works. Among these were The legend of Sleepy hollow and Rip Van Winkle. These works procured for him the reputation, at home and abroad, as a leader in the art of outline illustrations. He illustrated a great many books and made numerous admirable designs for bank-notes. For Cooper's works he made 500 illustrations. More than sixty of them were engraved on steel. He executed four large works ordered by Prince Napoleon while in this country. These were: Emigrants attacked by Indians on the prairies; The village blacksmith; The unwilling laborer, and Th
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jefferson, Joseph 1829- (search)
Jefferson, Joseph 1829- Actor; born in Philadelphia, Pa., Feb. 20, 1829; is descended from several generations of actors; made his first appearance on the stage when three years old; played in the old Spanish theatre in Matamoras, Mexico, two days after that city was taken by the Americans; and in 1857 established his reputation as a comedian by his performance as Asa Trenchard in Our American cousin, in New York City. In 1865 he appeared for the first time in his inimitable role of Rip Van Winkle, in the Adelphi Theatre, London, and, although he has since played in many of the most popular comedies of the day, and in various parts of the world, he will be remembered longest for his presentations of that character. Mr. Jefferson has also distinguished himself as an orator and a painter. For many years his chief diversions were fishing and painting, and in 1899 he permitted an exhibition of sixteen of his landscape-paintings in oil in the national capital. He published an autob
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 9: a literary club and its organ. (search)
uremberg, and chose his theme among the exiles of Acadia. It was not Irving who invested the Hudson with romance, but the Hudson that inspired Irving. In 1786, when Mrs. Josiah Quincy, then a young girl, sailed up that river in a sloop, she wrote: Our captain had a legend for every scene, either supernatural or traditional, or of actual occurrence during the war; and not a mountain reared its head, unconnected with some marvelous story. Irving was then a child of three years old, but Rip Van Winkle and Ichabod Crane — or their equivalents — were already on the spot, waiting for some one of sufficient literary talent to tell their tale. Margaret Fuller grew up at a time when our literature was still essentially colonial; not for want of material, but for want of self-confidence. As Theodore Parker said in his vigorous vernacular, somewhat later, the cultivated American literature was exotic, and the native literature was rowdy, consisting mainly of campaign squibs, coarse satire
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Preface (search)
doing what in him lies to give to his fellow countrymen a profound bias in favor of the autochthonous. What are the Tibers and Scamanders, he cries, measured by the Missouri and the Amazon? Or what the loveliness of Illysus or Avon by the Connecticut or the Potomack?-Whenever a nation wills it, prodigies are born. Admiration and patronage create myriads who struggle for the mastery, and for the olympick crown. Encourage the game and the victors will come. In some measure, no doubt, Rip Van Winkle, the Indian romances of Cooper, the philosophy of Emerson and Thoreau, the novels of Hawthorne, Longfellow's Evangeline, Miles Standish, and Hiawatha were responses to this encouragement of the game — to the nation's willing an expression of its new American consciousness. Against the full rigour of the demand for an independent national literature there was, by the middle of the last century, a wholesome reaction represented in Rufus Wilmot Griswold's introduction to his Prose writer
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: the early drama, 1756-1860 (search)
ists nine plays by American writers, among them Pocahontas by George Washington Custis and John Kerr's first draft of Rip Van Winkle. In 1829 Forrest produced the Indian play of Metamora by John Augustus Stone, an actor who lived during his creatiton in 1812 under the title of Paul and Alexis, were vastly popular. Most important in this class was the genesis of Rip Van Winkle. As early as 26 May, 1828, Thomas Flynn seems to have played a version of Rip Van Winkle in Albany. It was written Rip Van Winkle in Albany. It was written by an native of Albany. Phelps, H. S., Players of a century, Albany, 1880. In October, 1829, there was produced in Philadelphia Durang, Second Series, Chap. L. a version written in whole or part by John Kerr, in which W. Chapman and later J. H. Hackett played Rip Van Winkle and J. Jefferson played Knickerbocker. This version was very popular and was afterward played in New York. A later play by Charles Burke is an adaptation of this one, with certain changes, notably the preservation of
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 4: Irving (search)
his shy and retiring habits. As he sat in the Senate Hall, the students saluted him with cries of Here comes old Knickerbocker, How about Ichabod Crane? Has Rip Van Winkle waked up yet? and Who discovered Columbus? In 1832, Irving returned to New York, having been absent from his country for seventeen years. His fellow citizer by the author of his American principles, was stopped from any such folly by the fact that the same volume contained those immortal legends of the Hudson, Rip Van Winkle and The legend of Sleepy Hollow. In these stories, poems in prose, the author utilized, as the pathway and inspiration for his imagination, the great river oof letters. For the world at large, Irving will, however, doubtless best be known by his works of imagination, and the students in the gallery in Oxford who chaffed Diedrich Knickerbocker as he was receiving his degree were probably right in selecting as the characteristic and abiding production of the author his Rip Van Winkle.
1 2 3 4