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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing land forces at Charleston, S. C. (search)
awley. Anderson's Brigade, Joined after capture of Morris Island by Union forces. Brig.-Gen. G. T. Anderson: 7th Ga., Col. W. W. White; 8th Ga., Col. John R. Towers; 9th Ga., Col. B. Beck; 11th Ga., Col. F. H. Little; 59th Ga., Col. Jack Brown. Wise's Brigade, Joined after capture of Morris Island by Union forces. Brig.-Gen. Henry A. Wise: 26th Va., Col. P. R. Page; 4th Va. Heavy Art'y, Col. J. T. Goode; 46th Va., Col. R. T. W. Duke; 59th Va., Col. W. B. Tabb. General Beauregard, in hisBrig.-Gen. Henry A. Wise: 26th Va., Col. P. R. Page; 4th Va. Heavy Art'y, Col. J. T. Goode; 46th Va., Col. R. T. W. Duke; 59th Va., Col. W. B. Tabb. General Beauregard, in his official report, says: The total loss in killed and wounded on Morris Island from July 10th to Sept. 7th was only 641 men; and deducting the killed and wounded due to the landing on July 11th and 18th, the killed and wounded by the terrible bombardment, which lasted almost uninterruptedly, night and day, during fifty-eight days, only amounted to 296 men, many of whom were only slightly wounded. It is still more remarkable that during the same period of time, when the enemy fired 6202 shots and
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate Army. (search)
valry: 3d N. C., Col. John A. Baker; 7th S. C., Col. W. P. Shingler. Whiting's division, Maj.-Gen. W. H. C. Whiting. Wise's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Henry A. Wise: 26th Va., Col. P. R. Page; 34th Va.,----; 46th Va.,----; 59th Va., Col. William B. TaBrig.-Gen. Henry A. Wise: 26th Va., Col. P. R. Page; 34th Va.,----; 46th Va.,----; 59th Va., Col. William B. Tabb. Martin's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James G. Martin: 17th N. C.,----; 42d N. C.,----; 66th N. C.,----. Cavalry, Brig.-Gen. James Dearing: 7th Confederate, Col. V. H. Taliaferro; 8th Ga., Col. Joel R. Griffin; 4th N. C., Col. Dennis D. Ferrebee; 65th N. 51941 2102506 Barton's brigadeMay10 3617934 249 Hagood's brigadeMay6-954 25337344 B. Johnson's brigadeMay7-92 10 12 Martin's brigadeMay20 13928 113 Wise's brigadeMay16-20 18162  180 Wise's brigadeJune29 49 58 Fifty-ninth VirginiaMay8 32220 45 51941 2102506 Barton's brigadeMay10 3617934 249 Hagood's brigadeMay6-954 25337344 B. Johnson's brigadeMay7-92 10 12 Martin's brigadeMay20 13928 113 Wise's brigadeMay16-20 18162  180 Wise's brigadeJune29 49 58 Fifty-ninth VirginiaMay8 322
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.27 (search)
ions, and notably from South Carolina, to assist in the defense of the Confederate capital: first, Hagood's brigade; next, Wise's; and soon afterward, Colquitt's. So great was the anxiety of the Administration at this juncture that Hagood's brigade, aylight by river road, to cut him off from his Bermuda base. You will take up your position to-night on Swift Creek, with Wise's, Martin's, Dearing's, and two regiments of Colquitt's brigade, with about twenty pieces under Colonel Jones. At day-bre division was to follow along the turnpike about three hundred yards in rear of the last brigade. General Whiting, with Wise's, Martin's, and Dearing's commands, with two regiments of Colquitt's brigade and twenty pieces of artillery under Colonelits distinguished commander, and I was finally left with. a portion only of Bushrod Johnson's division, say 3200 mel, and Wise's brigade, 2200 more, including the local militia, making in all some 5400 men, with whom I was expected to protect, not o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Operations South of the James River. (search)
small-arms, wagons, horses, and other materials of war, and was completely successful in defeating two of the most formidable and well-organized expeditions of the enemy. This was accomplished at a cost in my division of 719 killed, wounded, and missing. . . . editors. Ii. Repelling the first assault on Petersburg. By R. E. Colston, Brigadier-General, C. S. A. at the end of April, 1864, I was transferred from the Department of Georgia to that of Virginia and was assigned by General H. A. Wise to the provisional command of the post of Petersburg, which I had already held from January to March, 1863. General Wise returned to Petersburg about June 1st, and I remained there while waiting for another assignment. At that time the lines covering Petersburg on the south side of the Appomattox formed a semicircle of about eight miles development, resting upon the river at each extremity. With the exception of a few lunettes and redoubts at the most commanding positions, they wer
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Petersburg and Richmond: December 31st, 1864. (search)
; 61st N. C., Lieut.-Col. Wm. S. Devane. Kirkland's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. W. Kirkland: 17th N. C.. Lieut.-Col. T. H. Sharpe; 42d N. C., Col. J. E. Brown; 66th N. C., Col. John H. Nethercutt. Johnson's division, Maj.-Gen. Bushrod R. Johnson. Wise's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Henry A. Wise: 26th Va., Capt. W. R. Perrin; 34th Va., Col. J. T. Goode; 46th Va., Capt. J. H. White; 59th Va., Maj. R. G. Mosby. Elliott's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Stephen Elliott, Jr.: 17th S. C., Col. F. W. McMaster; 18th S. C.Brig.-Gen. Henry A. Wise: 26th Va., Capt. W. R. Perrin; 34th Va., Col. J. T. Goode; 46th Va., Capt. J. H. White; 59th Va., Maj. R. G. Mosby. Elliott's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Stephen Elliott, Jr.: 17th S. C., Col. F. W. McMaster; 18th S. C., Lieut.-Col. W. B. Allison; 22d S. C., Col. W. G. Burt; 23d S. C., Col. H. L. Benbow; 26th S. C., Col. A. D. Smith; Holcombe S. C. Legion, Capt. A. B. Woodruff. Gracie's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. A. Gracie, Jr.: 41st Ala., Col. M. L. Stansel; 43d Ala., Lieut.-Col. J. J. Jolly; 59th Ala., Lieut.-Col. G. W. Huguley; 60th Ala., Col. J. W. A. Sanford; 23d Ala. Batt'n, Maj. N. Stallworth. Ransom's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. M. W. Ransom: 24th N. C., Lieut.-Col. J. L. Harris; 25th N. C., Col. H. M. Rutledge; 35th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Five Forks and the pursuit of Lee. (search)
ncipally by the cavalry, whilst the infantry corps held the position our troops were first driven from, threatening an advance upon the railroad, and paralyzing the force of reserve cavalry by necessitating its being stationary in an interposing position to check or retard such an advance. . . . I remained in position on Hatcher's Run, near Five Forks, during the night, and was joined by tlhe cavalry which was driven back the previous afternoon, and by Lieutenant-General [R. H.] Anderson with Wise's and Gracie's brigades, who, leaving the position at Burgess's Mills, had marched by a circuitous route to our relief. Had lie advanced up the direct road it would have brought hlim on the flank and rear of the infantry forming the enemy's right, which attacked our left at Five Forks, and probably changed the result of tlhe unequal contest. Whilst Anderson was marching, the Fifth Corps was marching back, and was enabled to participate in the attack upon our lines the next day, whilst the s
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Appomattox campaign. (search)
t. Thomas E. Gregg; Va. Battery, Capt. George M. Cayce; Va. Battery, Capt. Thomas Ellett; Va. Battery (Brander's), Lieut. James E. Tyler. Anderson's Corps, Lieut.-Gen. Richard H. Anderson. Johnson's division, Maj.-Gen. Bushrod R. Johnson. Wise's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Henry A. Wise: 26th Va., Maj. William K. Perrin; 34th Va., Col. J. Thomas Goode; 46th Va.,----; 59th Va., Col. William B. Tabb. Wallace's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. H. Wallace: 17th S. C., Capt. E. A. Crawford; 18th S. C., Lieut.Brig.-Gen. Henry A. Wise: 26th Va., Maj. William K. Perrin; 34th Va., Col. J. Thomas Goode; 46th Va.,----; 59th Va., Col. William B. Tabb. Wallace's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. H. Wallace: 17th S. C., Capt. E. A. Crawford; 18th S. C., Lieut.-Col. W. B. Allison; 22d S. C., Col. W. G. Burt; 23d S. C., Lieut.-Col. John M. Kinloch; 26th S. C., Maj. C. S. Land; Holcombe S. C. Legion,----. Moody's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Young M. Moody: 41st Ala., Col. Martin L. Stansel; 43d Ala., Maj. William J. Mims; 59th Ala., Maj. Lewis H. Crumpler; 60th Ala., Col. John W. A. Sanford; 23d Ala. Batt'n, Maj. N. Stallworth. Ranson's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Matthew W. Ransom: 24th N. C.,----; 25th N. C., Col. Henry M. Rutledge; 35th N. C., Maj. R. E. Petty; 49th
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 2: preliminary rebellious movements. (search)
, in Virginia, that ever-restless mischief-maker, ex-governor Henry A. Wise, with R. M. T. Hunter, John Tyler, James M. Masonlic four years before, In response to an invitation from Wise, a convention of Governors of Slave-labor States was secretn C. Fremont, the Republican candidate for the Presidency. Wise afterward boasted that, had Fremont been elected, he shouldavis on the 30th of September, said :--I have a letter from Wise, of the 27th, full of spirit. He says the governments of Nealth to join her Southern sisters in the work of treason. Wise, who assumed to be their orator on all occasions, had openlion of Robert Barnwell Rhett, also of South Carolina, Henry A. Wise. that all true statesmanship in the South consists in . --Rather than submit one moment to Black Republican rule, Wise wrote to an old friend of his father, in the North, I woulddated Rolleston, near Norfolk, Va., December 24, 1860. Governor Wise, it will be remembered, was chiefly instrumental in pro
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 4: seditious movements in Congress.--Secession in South Carolina, and its effects. (search)
e found extremely difficult to see through, Mr. Memminger, in an autograph letter before me, written to R. B. Rhett, Jr., editor of The Charleston Mercury, and dated Richmond, Va., January 28, 1860, revealed some of the difficulties in the way of the success of his treasonable mission. He says:-- It is extremely difficult to see through the Virginia Legislature. The Democratic party is not a unit, and the Whigs hope to cleave it with their wedge, whenever dissensions arise. Governor Wise seems to me to be really with us, as well as Mr. Hunter, but he seems to think it necessary to throw out tubs to the Union whale. The effect here of Federal politics is most unfortunate. It makes this great State comparatively powerless. I am making but little progress, as every thing proceeds here very slowly. They have got into a tangle about committees, which has excited considerable feeling to-day, and may embarrass the result. But still I hope that the result will be favorable.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 5: events in Charleston and Charleston harbor in December, 1860.--the conspirators encouraged by the Government policy. (search)
n he would send a re-enforcement, and order Major Anderson to hold the forts against attack. Memoir of Scott, II. 614. The last sentence gave Floyd a new idea of a method to aid the conspiracy. The Virginia traitors (of whom he was the chief, in efficient action), at that time, contemplated the seizure of the immense Fortress Monroe at Hampton Roads, which guarded the great Navy Yard at Norfolk, and would be of vast importance to the conspirators in executing the scheme entertained by Wise and others, of seizing the National Capital before Lincoln's inauguration, and taking possession of the Government. Floyd would gladly weaken the garrison of Fortress Monroe for that purpose, at the expense of the Charleston forts; and he now said quickly, and with great animation, We have a vessel-of-war (the Brooklyn) held in readiness at Norfolk, and I will send three hundred men in her, from Fort Monroe to Charleston. Scott replied that so many men could not be spared from Fortress Monr
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