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Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 103 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 57 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 48 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 46 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 43 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 42 2 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 41 1 Browse Search
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley) 40 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 35 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for Henry A. Wise or search for Henry A. Wise in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 4 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Organization of the two governments. (search)
r-General March 16, 1861, vice David E. Twiggs, dismissed March 1, 1861.) * Afterward in the Confederate service. The United States Navy Department. Secretary of the Navy: Gideon Welles. Assistant Secretary: Gustavus V. Fox. Yards and Docks: Rear-Admiral Joseph Smith. Ordnance and Hydrography Captain George A. Magruder (dismissed April 22, 1861) Captain Andrew A. Harwood (relieved July 22, 1862) Rear-Admiral John A. Dahlgren (relieved June 24, 1863) Commander Henry A. Wise. (By act of Congress of July 5, 1862, Hydrography was transferred to the Bureau of Navigation.) Navigation (established by act of July 5, 1862) Rear-Admiral Charles A. Davis. Equipment and recruiting (established by act of July 5, 1862) Rear-Admiral Andrew H. Foote (relieved June 3, 1863) Commander Albert N. Smith. Construction, equipment, and repair. Chief Naval Constructor John Lenthall. (By act of July 5, 1862, the Equipment and recruiting Bureau was org
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Jackson at Harper's Ferry in 1861. (search)
manufactured and stored there was organized at the Exchange Hotel in Richmond on the night of April 16th, 1861. Ex-Governor Henry A. Wise was at the head of this purely impromptu affair. The Virginia Secession Convention, then sitting, was by a lar Richmond Enquirer, summoning me to Richmond, where I arrived the next day. Before reaching the Exchange Hotel I met ex-Governor Wise on the street. He asked me to find as many officers of the armed and equipped volunteers of the inland towns and co a letter of Mr. Barbour, regarding the security of the armory.-editors. These persons, with myself, promptly joined ex-Governor Wise, and a plan for the capture of Harper's Ferry was at once discussed and settled upon. The movement, it was agreed,ington in case there should be a leak in the telegraph offices. Early in the evening a message had been received by ex-Governor Wise from his son-in-law Doctor Garnett of Washington, to the effect that a Massachusetts regiment, one thousand strong,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., McClellan in West Virginia. (search)
ion with his best-prepared troops, postponing his Kanawha plan till north-western Virginia should be cleared of hostile forces. Reference to the map will show that as the Potomac route was usually in the hands of the Northern forces, a Confederate occupation of West Virginia must be made either by the Staunton and Beverly road, or by the Kanawha route, of which the key-point west of the mountains was Gauley Bridge. General Lee determined to send columns upon both these lines--General Henry A. Wise upon the Kanawha route, and General Robert S. Garnett to Beverly. Upon Porterfield's retreat to Beverly after the Philippi races, Garnett, who had been an officer in the United States army, was ordered to Beverly to assume command and to stimulate the recruiting and organization of regiments from the secession element of the population. Some Virginia regiments, raised on the eastern slope of the mountains, were sent with him, and to these was soon added the 1st Georgia. On the 1s
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 14.53 (search)
s of North Carolina. The Confederate commander at Roanoke Island was General Henry A. Wise, who, on the 7th of January, 1862, had assumed command of the Chowan di for this disaster was afterward the subject of recrimination between them. General Wise claimed that he had been deprived of his artillery by reason of the countermisaster at Roanoke Island. There was also lack of cordial agreement between General Wise and Flag-Officer Lynch. General Wise being ill at Nag's Head on the day of tGeneral Wise being ill at Nag's Head on the day of the battle, the Confederate troops on the field were under command of Colonel H. M. Shaw, who says in his report: An unceasing and effective fire was kept up from 7 A. morning of February 9th, having heard that a portion of the command of General Henry A. Wise still remained at Nag's Head, General Parke ordered that I should take ce to our landing. The fact was sufficiently accounted for when we learned that Wise with his whole command had retreated northward at sundown the day before. Fr