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equipments. After the occupation of the town, the rebels were lying all about the pavements and on the doors, resting. They sat on their horses when mounted, says the correspondent, as if "they grew out of their backs." Gen Jenkins ordered all the private arms in the city taken possession of, as the citizens had fired on our troops. The stores were opened, and sometimes the Confederates paid for goods with Confederate money, and sometimes they — didn't. Miscellaneous. Commander Henry A. Wise has been appointed Acting Chief of the Ordnance Bureau at Washington. The property of Mrs. Mary E. Dandridge, (formerly Mrs. W. W. S. Bliss,) a daughter of Gen. Zachary Taylor, has been confiscated at Detroit, Michigan. Rear Admiral A. H. Foot, U. S. N., died in New York Friday. He was a genuine Yankee, from New Haven, Conn. A pile of the tabooed papers--New York World, Chicago Times, and quire--were burnt in the streets of Leavenworth, Kansas, on the 19th. A band o
Foreign intervention. We like nothing better in the late letter of Henry A. Wise to Mr. Holmes than his manly and emphatic condemnation of the nervous anxiety for foreign intervention manifested by so many impatient people.--Whilst he desires recognition, he does not desire intervention, nor look upon it as a thing to be desired by any intelligent patriot. The man in a fight who is always looking over his shoulder to see if somebody is coming to help him, and abusing the by standers because they keep aloof, is not likely to impress the world with any very deep conviction of his conscious strength. No matter what the odds against us, we must struggle as if we had not a friend upon the earth if we ever expect to win our freedom, and shall be more likely to win friends by such proud self-reliance than by manifesting the slightest solicitude for outside aid. Liberty which is easily won is as easily lost, and independence which is achieved by, dependence upon others is independence
or Burroughs. Gen. Butler has issued an order forbidding all officers to employ able-bodied negroes, it being his intention "to enlist them all in the service of the Government." The capture of Major Edgar Burroughs, the partisan ranger, is announced in a letter, dated Norfolk, the 4th inst. It says: The importance of this capture is great — breaking up, as it does, a numerous and pestilential band of guerillas. Burroughs is a noted man in Princess Anne county. He ran against Henry A. Wise for the State Convention, which was held in the spring of 61, as the "immediate secession" candidate. He is a Methodist preacher, and is said to possess great wealth. At the breaking out of the war he raised a cavalry company in Princess Anne and entered the rebel service. About a year ago by returned to Norfolk, went voluntarily to Gen. Vicle, and was paroled. Soon after his return home he was created a "Major of Partisan Rangers" by the authorities at Richmond, and, in violation of
The Daily Dispatch: March 2, 1864., [Electronic resource], Daring raid of the enemy — they Approach within three miles of the City — their Repulse on the Brook road — reported Fighting on the Westham Plank road. (search)
rtillery. The best information we have leads to the impression that their force at this point did not exceed 1, 3000. In the fight nothing but artillery was used. The column that went into Goochland county paid a visit to the farm of Hon. James A. Seddon, Secretary of War. We heard last night that the damage done by them on his place amounted to but little. They burnt two or three flouring mills in the county, among them the Dover Mill, some twenty-five miles above this city. Gen. Henry A. Wise, who was at the residence of his son-in- law, Mr. Hobson, in Goochland, narrowly escaped capture. He was at Mr. H.'s when the enemy went to Mr. Seddon's place, and hearing of their presence in the neighborhood he put out for Richmond, and arrived here about the middle of the day yesterday. This column of the enemy is said to have consisted of four regiments of cavalry and one battery of artillery. A report reached the city last night that a portion of them had crossed James river, w
suddenly receive such a statement in relation to a "Christian gentleman." Speech of John W. Forney. In Washington, on Saturday night, John W. Forney was serenaded, and made a speech in reply. That portion of his speech which gives the Yankee idea of what this war is for, is brief, and here it is: For, after all, when you contemplate Mr. Lincoln's Administration, what has he done? I stand to night immediately before the house once occupied by Dr. Garnett, a son-in-law of Henry A. Wise. I stand upon my own property — bought by my hard earnings, twelve years ago, in this city. This gentleman, Dr. Garnett, was practicing (and I use his name simply to illustrate how much these men have lost by parting from the old Union) his profession prosperously and well, and was beloved by his neighbors. He was my personal friend for a long time, and a most excellent physician. When this hellish rebellion broke out however, impelled by that dreadful impulse which called so many go
somewhat abnormal condition of the household. His new sled — the "Kearsarge"--behaves as well as its namesake. The Arago has got back to New York, so that I think we shall get news from Sid to-night.--Best love to husband and babies. Your ever affectionate papa, E. E. The "Everett" alluded to is Edward Everett Wise, a young son of Captain Wise, who was visiting his grandfather at the time of his death. "Sid," also alluded to, is Mr. Everett's oldest son, about thirty years of age, a major in the volunteer service, and now at Beaufort, South Carolina, serving upon the staff of General Saxton. Mr. Everett had three sons and two daughters by his wife, Charlotte Gray, daughter of the late Hon. Peter C. Brooks, who died about two years ago. One daughter died while Mr. Everett was minister to London, and subsequently he lost a son. Two sons, Henry Sidney Everett and William Everett, and a daughter, survive him. The latter is married to Commander Henry A. Wise, of the navy.
his remarks, expressed himself in favor of the restoration of General Joseph E. Johnston to the command of the Army of Tennessee. On motion, by Mr. Garland, the further consideration of the subject was postponed till Monday. The bill to establish the flag of the Confederate States was taken up and passed. On motion, by Mr. Sparrow, the Senate adjourned. House of Representatives. The House met at 11 o'clock, and was opened with prayer by the Rev. Dr. Hoge. The Speaker laid before the House certain patriotic resolutions, adopted by Wise's brigade, which were, after discussion, laid on the table and ordered to be printed. Mr. Smith, of North Carolina, from the Committee on Claims, reported a bill for the relief of Nathaniel Moore from responsibility for Government funds captured by the enemy. Pending the consideration of which, the morning hour having expired, the House resolved into secret session. The doors being re-opened, the House adjourned.
peak in the open air at night. But he might select his own hour--twelve, one or two o'clock in the day. We trust that this suggestion will be considered. General Wise's address. Brigadier-General Henry A. Wise, by request, addressed the Virginia Legislature and the public generally in the Hall of the House of Delegates oBrigadier-General Henry A. Wise, by request, addressed the Virginia Legislature and the public generally in the Hall of the House of Delegates on Saturday night. The hall and rotunda of the capitol were densely crowded before General Wise began his address, and hundreds of person who had come to hear him were unable to gain admission to the building. The address will be published in full. Abolition of slavery by the United States Congress. It will be seen by our General Wise began his address, and hundreds of person who had come to hear him were unable to gain admission to the building. The address will be published in full. Abolition of slavery by the United States Congress. It will be seen by our extracts from Northern journals that the Yankee Congress have passed an amendment to the Constitution abolishing slavery throughout the United States, which, in their acceptation of that term, means also the Confederate States. Before this amendment can become a law of the United States proper, it must be ratified by the Legislat
Letter from General Lee. --The resolutions recently passed by General Wise's brigade were presented to General Lee, enclosed in a letter from General Wise. The following is the Commander-in-Chief's reply: "Headquarters army of"Northern Virginia. "February 4th, 1865. "Brigadier-General Henry A. Wise, Commanding, &c.: General Wise. The following is the Commander-in-Chief's reply: "Headquarters army of"Northern Virginia. "February 4th, 1865. "Brigadier-General Henry A. Wise, Commanding, &c.: "General: I have received the declaration of principles and rights made by your brigade, and return my thanks to yourself, your officers and men. The spirit evinced in this document is the true one. If our people will sustain the noble soldiers of the Confederacy, and evince the same resolution and fortitude under their triBrigadier-General Henry A. Wise, Commanding, &c.: "General: I have received the declaration of principles and rights made by your brigade, and return my thanks to yourself, your officers and men. The spirit evinced in this document is the true one. If our people will sustain the noble soldiers of the Confederacy, and evince the same resolution and fortitude under their trials which have characterized the army, I feel no apprehension about the issue of this contest. I do not see how we can, by any compromise or negotiation, abate aught of the rights claimed in this admirable declaration without a surrrender of the liberties we derived from our ancestors. "As long as our soldiers are animated b
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