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The Daily Dispatch: August 19, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House 2 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 2 0 Browse Search
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Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Xlvii. (search)
was the subject of the amusement. Glancing through the half-open door, Mr. Lincoln caught sight of me, and the story had to be repeated for my benefit. The incident was trifling in itself, but the President's enjoyment of it was very exhilarating. I never saw him in so frolicsome a mood as on this occasion. It has been well said by a critic of Shakspeare, that the spirit which held the woe of Lear, and the tragedy of Hamlet, would have broken, had it not also had the humor of the Merry Wives of Windsor, and the merriment of Midsummer Night's Dream. With equal justice can this profound truth be applied to the late President. The world has had no better illustration of it since the immortal plays were written. Mr. Lincoln's laugh stood by itself. The neigh of a wild horse on his native prairie is not more undisguised and hearty. A group of gentlemen, among whom was his old Springfield friend and associate, Hon. Isaac N. Arnold, were one day conversing in the passage ne
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 4 (search)
could not satisfy the extremists of Ohio (anti-slavery) and those of Kentucky (pro-slavery), but tried by a moderate course to steer between them. Did I tell you the old Reserves had subscribed fifteen hundred dollars to present me with a sword, sash, belt, etc.? It is expected they will be ready about the close of the month, when I am to go, if possible, to their camp near Washington to receive them. Falmouth, Va., March 21, 1863. I had seen in the papers a glowing account of the Merry Wives of Windsor, which must have been a great treat. There is nothing I feel so much the deprivation of as hearing good music, and I was very sorry that there was no opportunity to indulge myself while in Philadelphia. We have literally nothing new or exciting in camp. Averill's brilliant cavalry foray has been the camp talk. The enemy, through Richmond papers, admit they were whipped and believe it to be the commencement of Hooker's campaign, and already talk of the probable necessity o
The Merry Wives in Italian. --The translation of Shakespeare's "Merry Wives" into the Italian libretto of Nicolai's opera involves some very amusing lingual oddities. Nothing seems less adapted to the soft Italian tongue than the vigorous, coarse English of this play. Thus Jack Falstaff is translated into Sir Giovanni Falstaff; the "Merry Wives" are le mogli scherzanti; and Falstaff's cry for "sack" is rendered ola da ber portato — dov'e l mio sack? The Merry Wives in Italian. --The translation of Shakespeare's "Merry Wives" into the Italian libretto of Nicolai's opera involves some very amusing lingual oddities. Nothing seems less adapted to the soft Italian tongue than the vigorous, coarse English of this play. Thus Jack Falstaff is translated into Sir Giovanni Falstaff; the "Merry Wives" are le mogli scherzanti; and Falstaff's cry for "sack" is rendered ola da ber portato — dov'e l mio sac