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Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 7 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for George H. Wood or search for George H. Wood in all documents.

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Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: strategic Reconnoissances. (search)
r nearest batteries were more than sixteen hundred yards from the fort; four rifled guns in battery Sigel, one of those nearest the fort, had been assigned to the men from the Wabash. The batteries were occupied at daylight, and kept up a steady and well-directed fire until the flag of the fort was hauled down at 2 P. M. Commander Rodgers commended the conduct of Lieutenant Irwin, Master Robertson, and Midshipmen M. L. Johnson and F. H. Pearson, and also of petty officers Lewis Boun and George H. Wood. Before the fort surrendered the barbette guns had been silenced and many of them dismounted. The breach was practicable for storming in two places, and the projectiles were passing through and knocking down the opposite wall, which protected the magazine, so that the garrison was convinced that in an hour or so the magazine must be blown up. Commander Rodgers's report. The heavy Xiii-inch mortars inflicted little injury; the shells falling upon the casemates did not seem to s
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: naval attack on Charleston. (search)
for the detailed drawings of the [21] light-draught monitors, and for the calculations as to their displacement. It was expected that they would not draw over six and one-half feet of water, and be out of water amidships about fifteen inches. The contracts were made generally in the spring of 1863, and the vessels were to be furnished in the fall of that year. The Chimo, at Boston, was the first one finished. She was under the entire direction of Chief-Engineer Stimers. Instead of being fifteen inches out of water she was only three inches on an average, showing a miscalculation of one foot. The Department immediately removed Mr. Stimers from the position of general superintendent, and placed the question of what should be done to remedy the difficulties occasioned by his error in the hands of Rear-Admiral Gregory, Chief-Engineer Wood, and Captain Ericsson (letter of Assistant Secretary of the Navy, December 15, 1864, to Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, vol. 3, 1865).
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter VIII Hatteras InletRoanoke Island. (search)
icent sound with its wide ramifications, directed in 1861 the preparation and concentration of such naval force as was available, and invited an army co-operation for its capture. The military importance of holding Hatteras Inlet was at that time quite unappreciated save by the Navy Department. The transport steamers were chartered by the navy and commanded by navy officers, and the detachment of troops was to return to Fort Monroe after the expedition. It was not intended that you (General Wood) should take any further action in relation to the expedition than to provide such troops for the same as on conference with Commodore Stringham should be found sufficient for the purpose. The expedition originated in the Navy Department, and is under its control. Letter of Assistant Adjutant-General, Rebellion Records, Vol. IV., p. 580. General Wool, at Fort Monroe, on the 25th of August, 1861, made a detail of 860 men under General B. F. Butler, who was directed to report, as s
m commanded, the batteries, and the casualties in the fleet. Among the killed in the assault were Lieutenants Preston and Porter, both of them young officers of great ability and admirable qualities; also Assistant-Surgeon Longshaw and Ensign Wiley, and by the explosion of the magazine, Paymaster Gillett and Ensign Leighton. There were wounded in the assault, Lieutenant-Commander Allen, Lieutenants Bache, Lamson, and Baury; Ensigns Evans, Harris, Chester, Bertwistle, O'Connor, Coffin, and Wood; Acting-Master Louch, and Mates Green, Simms, and Aldridge. In relation to Flag-Captain Breese, who led the assault, Lieutenant-Commander Parker said in his report: He led the advance to the palisades, and when he saw the rear delaying, endeavored, sword in hand, to bring them forward to our support. Failing to accomplish this, he returned, under a shower of bullets directed at him alone, to the sand-hills at C, and when it seemed no longer useful to remain there coolly followed the retr
lent feeling shown by, 56, 66 Woodbury, Paymaster, 131 Worden, Commander John L., 83 et seq., 92, 114, 162 (note) Wood, Chief-Engineer, 110 Wood, Ensign, 237 Wood, General, 165 Wood, George H., 62 Woodman, Master's Mate, 213 WoWood, Ensign, 237 Wood, General, 165 Wood, George H., 62 Woodman, Master's Mate, 213 Woodward, Master Thomas G., 177 Wool, General, 165 Wright, Brigadier-General, H. G., 19, 27; enters Wassaw Sound, 46 et seq.; in St. Andrew's Inlet, 49, 54 Wyalusing, the, 204, 207, 209, 214 Wyandotte, the, U. S. steamer, 6 Wyman, LieWood, General, 165 Wood, George H., 62 Woodman, Master's Mate, 213 Woodward, Master Thomas G., 177 Wool, General, 165 Wright, Brigadier-General, H. G., 19, 27; enters Wassaw Sound, 46 et seq.; in St. Andrew's Inlet, 49, 54 Wyalusing, the, 204, 207, 209, 214 Wyandotte, the, U. S. steamer, 6 Wyman, Lieutenant-Commanding R. H., 21 Y. Yantic, the, 222, 228 Young, Captain, 25Wood, George H., 62 Woodman, Master's Mate, 213 Woodward, Master Thomas G., 177 Wool, General, 165 Wright, Brigadier-General, H. G., 19, 27; enters Wassaw Sound, 46 et seq.; in St. Andrew's Inlet, 49, 54 Wyalusing, the, 204, 207, 209, 214 Wyandotte, the, U. S. steamer, 6 Wyman, Lieutenant-Commanding R. H., 21 Y. Yantic, the, 222, 228 Young, Captain, 25