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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 57 (search)
No. 53. reports of Brig. Gen. Thomas J. Wood, U. S. Army, commanding Third Division. Hdqrs. Third Division, Fourth Army Corps, Atlanta, Ga., September 10, 1864. Sir: The opening of the grand campaigns in the spring of 1864 witnessed a new phase in our military combinations. Previously dispersion of our troops, and of coe of artillery and musketry, not by the direct ones. For the heroism displayed, the commanding general expresses the warmest thanks. By command of Brigadier-General Wood: M. P. Bestow, Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General. General orders, no. 42. Hdqrs. 3D Div., 4TH Army Corps, Near Buck Head, Ga., July 19, 1864. reciation of each others good deeds. He tenders his thanks to the division for its good conduct, and expresses his sympathy for the officers and men who have on this occasion sealed their devotion to their country with their blood. By command of Brigadier-General Wood: M. P. bestow, Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 60 (search)
s were large, and attest the terrible character of the assault. Killed, 16; wounded, 71; missing, 67; among them 4 commissioned officers, Capt. L. F. Dimick, Company F; Capt. S. C. Comstock, Company I; Lieutenant Arenschield, Company F, and Lieutenant Wood, Company B. (For names, rank, and wounds, see schedule, marked A.) After retiring to the rear about 600 yards, built breast-works, worked all night at them, and remained in them May 28 and 29, the enemy occasionally feeling our lines and elW. A. Sampson, Company K; Captain Warren, Company E; Captain Dimick, Company F; Captain Howell, Company G; Captain Comstock, Company I; Captain Robinson and Captain Rigney, Company C, and Lieutenants Walker, Arenschield, Copp, Greenfield, Beecher, Wood, Pease, Tait, Miller, Swickard, Phelps, and Hale, and last, but not least, Lieut. and Adjt. J. M. Grosh and Sergt. Maj. B. O'Connor. I cannot let the occasion pass without bearing testimony to the zeal and efficiency of Surg. H. B. Tuttle and
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 66 (search)
the intrenchments north of the beleaguered city of Atlanta until the night of the 25th of August, when, at 8 p. m., in accordance with the instructions of Brigadier-General Wood, commanding the division, the troops were silently withdrawn and moved toward the right of the army. The Ninety-third Regiment Ohio Infantry, commanded b skirmishers into the main work, occupying and permanently holding a portion of their rifle-pits and temporary defenses. At this time I was informed that Brigadier-General Wood, commanding the division, had been severely wounded and carried from the field, and I immediately assumed command of the division, and notified Colonel Knes. By the time these dispositions were made it had begun to grow dark, and I received instructions from Major-General Stanley, commanding the corps, and from General Wood (who, upon recovering from the first shock of his wound, had insisted upon returning to the field), to hold the position during the night which we had gained.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 68 (search)
ampaign during the time that I had the honor to command the said regiment: In the absence of the field officers of the regiment, I assumed command of the same on the 24th of August. It was at that time lying in the trenches northeast of Atlanta. By direction of the brigade commander, the regiment left this position on the night of the 25th ultimo, marching in a westerly direction, crossing the Chattanooga railroad, and bivouacking about one mile beyond it. Here, by direction of Brigadier-General Wood, I threw out two companies (A and C) as picket guards to cover the brigade front. On the morning of the 26th the march was resumed in a southwesterly direction; we marched slowly a distance of about eight miles, camping at night, fronting the northeast. The two companies on picket duty the previous night, under the command of Captain Henderson, were engaged through the day as flankers and rear guard, and did not rejoin the regiment until after dark. On the morning of the 27th inst
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 73 (search)
t brigade, however, was soon broken, it having remained behind, and was not again met with the remainder of the day. Upon reporting this fact, I was ordered by General Wood to march in rear of the left, and at supporting distance of the First Brigade, of this division, and to be governed by its movements. Having crossed the streaarles F. Manderson, of the Nineteenth Ohio Volunteers. The Eighty-sixth Regiment Indiana Volunteers, Col. George F. Dick commanding, was detached by order of General Wood to cover a road on the line of advance, and remained there till the attack was over. Having received orders to that effect, the brigade marched in support of , of the Twentieth Corps, was to co-operate in the crossing, but, after considerable delay, that division failing to move and our preparations being completed, General Wood ordered the advance to be made without further loss of time. The skirmishers advanced rapidly upon the enemy's position, followed closely by the first line of
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 82 (search)
-Fifth Indiana Light Battery, Lieut. A. Morrison commanding; Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania Light Battery, Capt. S. M. McDowell commanding; Capt. Peter Simonson, Fifth Indiana Light Battery, chief of artillery. Second Division (Brig. Gen. John Newton)-Battery A, First Ohio Light Artillery, Capt. W. F. Goodspeed commanding; Battery M, First Illinois Light Artillery, Capt. George W. Spencer commanding; Capt. C. C. Aleshire, Eighteenth Ohio Light Battery, chief of artillery. Third Division (Brig. Gen. T. J. Wood)-Bridges' Battery, Illinois Light Artillery, Capt. Lyman Bridges commanding; Sixth Ohio Light Battery, Lieut. O. H. P. Ayres commanding; Capt. Cullen Bradley, Sixth Ohio Light Battery, chief of artillery. On May 3 the batteries moved with their respective divisions, the Fifth Indiana and Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania Batteries, and Battery M, First Illinois Light Artillery, marched via Red Clay to Catoosa Springs. Bridges' Battery and Sixth Ohio Light Battery marched via Ooltewah to
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 94 (search)
his, with the advance of part of General Davis' division and part of Wood's brigade, of Butterfield's division, to the ridge beyond the field,rlin's brigade across Mill Creek to relieve some of the regiments of Wood's brigade, which had been thrown in there on the evening previous, a and heard it reported to Major-General Thomas, by an officer of General Wood's staff, that the troops of that command had felt all along Chatupon the enemy's right, being in support to the division of Brigadier-General Wood. General Wood's division was formed in column by brigade, eGeneral Wood's division was formed in column by brigade, each brigade being in two lines. General King's brigade was formed in the same manner in rear of Wood's, and Scribner's at first on the left oWood's, and Scribner's at first on the left of King's; before the assault finally commenced, however, he was advanced to the left of Wood's center brigade, and in this position advanced wWood's center brigade, and in this position advanced with the column. For the particulars of their participation in this affair, as well as in the attack made upon our lines by the enemy on the n
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 96 (search)
rst position and encamped for the night. May 9.-Received orders to finish a reconnaissance which had been begun by Colonel Wood's brigade, Butterfield's division, around the point of Chattoogata Mountain, south side of the gap. Moved brigade forward, crossing Mill Creek. Relieved Colonel Wood's brigade. Placed the Eighty-eighth Indiana and One hundred and fourth Illinois into position along the spur extending from the point of the mountain to the gap and overlooking the enemy's works in fr of the road, pushed forward as far as crest of the ridge overlooking Swamp Creek. Was relieved from this position by Colonel Wood's brigade, of Butterfield's division, about 9 p. m., and moving to the left, took up position on left of General Ward'of absence, Col. A. G. McCook assumed command of the brigade, which after dark was relieved by General Hazen's brigade, of Wood's division, Fourth Army Corps, taking position from the Kenesaw Mountain running west. July 3.-The enemy having disapp
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 109 (search)
amp three days. Here our wagons carrying the officers' baggage were taken away, reducing them for the rest of the campaign to the same condition as the men and entailing great misery. Here also three more officers joined us, among them Capt. E. Gay, who assumed command of the detachment; one officer also left us on detached service. On the 24th we crossed the Etowah River and moved through the Allatoona Mountain, meeting the enemy on the 27th at New Hope Church, where we acted as support to Wood's division. Evening prevented our being called into action, so we merely, with the rest of the brigade, covered the withdrawal of his troops and threw up works on the ground we held. The following day we lost heavily skirmishing with the enemy, and during the ten days operations at that point, in addition to much suffering from wet and exposure, lost many men in killed and wounded. On the night of the 29th May two companies, A (First) and C (Second), gallantly charged and took a hill in ou
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 115 (search)
left of General King and advance with him in support of General Wood, whose division was formed in our front. The object ofof ravines, complicating the difficulties of the position. Wood's brigades were each formed in two lines, making the divisi to protect the left flank of the divisiQn. On the left of Wood flowed the creek, on the other side of which rose a ridge, fficulty I would have in advancing from the prolongation of Wood's line, I determined to throw my left forward and strengthen the line when Wood advanced. Two regiments had hardly moved out when a sharp fire was opened by the skirmishers, which cairmishers, who yielded stubbornly at our approach, but when Wood's leading brigade (Hazen's) advanced into the open field a y their works with our force; and dispositions were made by Wood to occupy the rising ground in the woods. This deployment sin, and Twenty-first Ohio in the front line on the left of Wood, the Seventy-ninth Pennsylvania having been detailed for sp
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