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A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.), Organization of the Confederate States Forces stationed near Tupelo, Miss., June 30, 1862. (search)
General Wm. J. Hardee. First brigade Commander: Colonel J. R. Liddell---2d Arkansas regiment, 5th Arkansas regiment, 6th Arkansas regiment, 7th Arkansas regiment, and 8th Arkansas regiment, Pioneer company and Roberts' Light battery. Second brigade Commander: Brigadier-General Cleburne---2d Tennessee regiment, 5th Tennessee regiment, 24th Tennessee regiment, and 48th Tennessee regiment and 15th Arkansas regiment, and Calvert's Light battery. Third brigade Commander: Brigadier-General Wood---44th Tennessee, 16th Alabama and 32d Mississippi regiment, and 33d Mississippi regiment, and Baxter's Light battery. Fourth brigade Commander: Brigadier-General Marmaduke---3d Confederate and 25th Tennessee regiment, 29th Tennessee regiment, and 37th Tennessee regiment, and Sweet's Light battery. Fifth brigade Commander: Colonel Hawthorne---17th Tennessee regiment, 21st Tennessee regiment, and 23d Tennessee regiment and 33d Alabama regiment, and Austin's Light battery.
of Polk's corps. Scogin's battery, Captain John Scogin; Turner's battery, Lieutenant W. B. Turner; Carnes' battery, Captain W. W. Carnes; Stanford's battery, Captain J. H. Stanford; Scott's battery, Captain W. L. Scott; Garrity's battery, Captain J. Garrity; Fowler's battery, Captain W. H. Fowler; Dent's battery, Captain S. H. Dent; Hamilton's battery, Lieutenant W. P. Hamilton. Major-General D. H. Hill's corps. Major-General P. R. Cleburne's division. First brigade Commander: Wood, Colonel M. P. Lowry---32d Mississippi regiment, and 45th Mississippi regiment, Lieutenant-Colonel R. Charlton; 16th Alabama regiment, Captain T. A. Ashford; 33d Alabama regiment, Colonel Sam. Adams; 45th Alabama regiment, Colonel E. B. Breedlove; Sharpshooters, Captain Dave Coleman. Second brigade Commander: Brigadier-General Liddell---2d Arkansas regiment, and 15th Arkansas regiment, Colonel D. C. Govan; 5th Arkansas regiment, and 13th Arkansas regiment, Lieutenant-Colonel Murray; 6th
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 6: H. Clay Pate. (search)
ty and inhumanity. While Pate was thus taking people prisoners without any legal authority or writs, he was joined by Captain Wood's company of Dragoons, who, so far from putting a stop to his violent career, aided him in it, and took from him, at hrer whom I had denounced, to read my productions to his men! First, came my humorous Confessions of a horse Thief. Captain Wood, the United States officer who arrested me, was spared the ridicule I had endeavored to throw on him; for Pate threw tocuments had been found on this person. This Redpath, he added, as if parenthetically, was arrested a few days ago by Captain Wood, of the United States army, on a charge of horse stealing; and was not released until the horses were produced! This he sentence following, that the construction of the words was accidental only: He was only released, he added, because Captain Wood could not find a magistrate to indict him! This was his revenge on me; on Mr. Moore it was more brutal and cowardly
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion, Pauline Cushman, the celebrated Union spy and scout of the Army of the Cumberland. (search)
g her life in solemn and terrible earnestness for her country's good. She was, at that time, playing at Mozart Hall, or Wood's theatre, in Louisville, Ky., then the headquarters of the rebel sympathizers of the southwest; and, although under Union a most virulent secessionist. Before she had left the theatre, the guards arrived to arrest her; but-out of respect to Mr. Wood, the proprietor of the theatre — they were deterred from actually executing their errand, and it was arranged that she new theatre of Nashville, Tenn., arrived at Louisville, engaged in looking up a good company of actors, and meeting with Mr. Wood of the Louisville theatre, was recommended to secure Miss Cushman. She is a good looking woman, and an accomplished act can only keep her out of the provost-marshal's hands, you will make a good thing, for she will be popular at once, said Mr. Wood. So the proposition was made to Pauline, and, after advising with the military authorities, under whose guidance she wa
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion, Part 2: daring enterprises of officers and men. (search)
n. His horse went down in the melee; but little Wood, the bugler of Company G, sprang down, and gave in getting away his arms before help came. As Wood still went after a horse another fellow rode atle fight. When I got up to the battery I found Wood there. He sang out to me to wait, and he wouldmen, who had just taken one, was going past, so Wood stopped him and got it for me. Just at that can touch it with your hand. The divisions of Wood and Sheridan are wading breast deep in the vall, and converged their fire down upon Baird, and Wood, and Sheridan. It was rifles and musketry; it had already set forth without it. Stout-hearted Wood, the iron-gray veteran, is rallying on his men;comes again, and the Vs move on. At the left of Wood, three regiments of Baird-Turchin, the Russian nest as the blood that reddened all the route. Wood uttered words that rang like Napoleon's, and Sh, and he honors the roll. A little German in Wood's Division is pierced like the lid of a pepper-
ghting men. I saw Broderick ride in with a cheer, and open a way for the men. His horse went down in the melee; but little Wood, the bugler of Company G, sprang down, and gave him his animal, setting off himself to catch another. A rebel rode at the bugler, and succeeded in getting away his arms before help came. As Wood still went after a horse another fellow rode at him. The boy happened at that moment to see a carbine, where it had been dropped after firing. He picked up the empty weapoh my pistol, and shooting others. Nobody managed to hit me through the whole fight. When I got up to the battery I found Wood there. He sang out to me to wait, and he would get me a horse. One of the men, who had just taken one, was going past, so Wood stopped him and got it for me. Just at that moment White's Battalion and some other troops came charging at the battery. The squadron of the First Maryland, who were supporting it, met the charge well as far as their numbers went; but were
tinct; it is fairly palpable; you can touch it with your hand. The divisions of Wood and Sheridan are wading breast deep in the valley of death. I never can tell t, opened like the fan of Lucifer, and converged their fire down upon Baird, and Wood, and Sheridan. It was rifles and musketry; it was grape and canister; it was shalong the line. But the advance had already set forth without it. Stout-hearted Wood, the iron-gray veteran, is rallying on his men; stormy Turchin is delivering brais immortal-thank God!-and up it comes again, and the Vs move on. At the left of Wood, three regiments of Baird-Turchin, the Russian thunderbolt, is there-hurl themse cheeks were wet with tears as honest as the blood that reddened all the route. Wood uttered words that rang like Napoleon's, and Sheridan, the rowels at his horse'sficer, straight up from the ranks, and he honors the roll. A little German in Wood's Division is pierced like the lid of a pepper-box, but he is neither dead nor w
derful revival in that celebrated command: In the latter part of March, he says, Chaplain Taylor, of the 23d Tennessee regiment, commenced a series of meetings at Tullahoma, assisted by Rev. A. W. Smith, of the 25th, and myself, which continued for several weeks, until temporarily interrupted by military movements. These meetings have resulted in much spiritual benefit to professed Christians, while about one hundred and five souls have embraced Christ as their Saviour. In General Wood's brigade a meeting of great interest has for several weeks been under the supervision of Rev. F. A. Kimball, chaplain of the 16th Alabama, assisted mainly by Colonel Reed, Chief of Provost Marshal Department, in Hardee's corps, and Col. Lowery, cf the 45th and 32d Mississippi, the result of which has been one hundred conversions. In the same brigade, Chaplain Otkin, of Col. Lowery's regiment, has been conducting religious services, which, from the best information received, has been pro
of criminals will be found quite as essential to a preservation of law and society as lofty arguments or high moral dissertations on the right or wrong of the expediencies necessary to bring wrong-doers to immediate and certain justice. As soon as I had received a full telegraphic report of the success of the Philadelphia experiment, I directed him to proceed to Louisville, where he would be met by operative Keating, from Chicago, who would bring letters of introduction from myself to Colonel Wood, commanding the First Infantry at New Orleans; Captain White, chief of the detective force of that city; General Canby, commanding the Department of Texas, at Austin; Col. Hunt, Chief Quartermaster of the Department of Texas, and other army officers, requesting them to render my son and his assistant any aid in their power should the necessity for such assistance arise; the requisition from Governor Foulke, of Dakotah Territory, for Henry G. Taylor, upon Governor Pease, of Texas, and gen
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 16: Dana returns to Washington (search)
ble morning. It is not my purpose to recount the details here, but merely to point out the fact that Dana, who happened to be behind the divisions of Davis and Sheridan, which had just been placed in line to fill the gap made by the withdrawal of Wood, was swept away in the debacle which followed the first successful onrush of the Confederate columns, and as soon as he could disentangle himself rode rapidly to Chattanooga. It must be added that Rosecrans, McCook, Crittenden, Sheridan, Davis, Vp, formed with brigade fronts, three brigades being massed behind each other, firing as they advanced. The fire was more violent than I ever heard before, but I do not think our lines would have been broken but for a gap in them caused by taking Wood's division from the centre to reinforce the left, and not entirely filling up the space thus vacated. Through that gap the rebels came in, and then Davis's division broke and ran in helpless panic. I never saw anything so crushing to the mind as
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