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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 11., Ye olde Meting-House of Meadford. (search)
an alley from the door on either side and before the little pue and deacons' seat. At this point it is well to consider the peculiar situation of affairs existing, for Medford was a peculiar. Soon after the meeting-house was built Mr. Benjamin Woodbridge was invited to preach. As he lived in Charlestown, the town provided a horse for him to ride to and fro (coming on Saturday and returning on Monday), and paying two shillings therefor, if well shod. The reverend gentleman had been ordaasion. It is hardly likely that he did so when he lodged with John Bradshaw, as his home was only across the way. Notice just here again we said the town; there was no church or organized body of worshipers, though some effort was made by Mr. Woodbridge during his stay for such. He desired to reside in Medford, and wished the town to build him a house, which would have been larger (2 ft. wider and 8 ft. longer) than the meeting-house was. The town declined to do so, and he proceeded to have
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 11., Ye olde Meting-House of Meadford. (search)
outgrown. Three have been destroyed by fire; one is now beyond the limits of Medford, owing to change of boundary, while one has been moved into its borders. Five have become devoted to business and residential use, leaving eighteen in present service, with one homeless society about to rebuild. One is the college church. Therefore, to eighteen organized bodies has increased the gathering at John Bradshaw's house on that winter day one hundred and ninety-five years ago. Could Rev. Mr. Woodbridge ride from Charlestown to Medford on horseback, as of yore, he would not have to alight and open the gate across the road near Marble brook ere he could proceed. Mr. Aaron Warner would find his old parish somewhat changed on doctrinal points, but ready to welcome him, and possibly he might not be pleased with the chiming bells and liturgical service across the country road, as he would call High street. Parson Turell would look in vain for his old home, only demolished in recent yea