Your search returned 148 results in 76 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 1: parentage, and Early years. (search)
h, he caused her to be baptized with his mother's name, Julia Neale. In the year 1830, Mrs. Jackson, whose youth and beauty still fitted her to please, married Mr. Woodson, a lawyer of Cumberland County, Virginia, whom the rising importance of the Northwest had attracted, along with many other Eastern Virginians, to that country. t on the opposite side, liberal pecuniary aid if she would continue to bear her first husband's name. But love, as usual, was omnipotent. Upon her marriage to Mr. Woodson, his scanty resources compelled her to accept the protection of her former husband's kindred for her children, which she had at first declined as an infliction.Jackson family, the office of Clerk of the Court in the county of Fay. ette, which lies on the New River, west of Greenbrier. After one year of married life, Mrs. Woodson's constitution sank upon giving birth to a son; two months after, she died, on the 4th of December, 1831; and her remains await their resurrection not far from
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 50: operations in 1865. (search)
artillery would have perished had they been kept in the Valley. Echols' brigade of Wharton's division was subsequently sent to Southwestern Virginia to report to General Echols for special duty, and McNeil's company of partisan rangers, and Woodson's company of unattached Missouri cavalry, were sent to the county of Hardy, Major Harry Gilmor being likewise ordered to that county, with the remnant of his battalion, to take charge of the whole, and operate against the Baltimore & Ohio Railronce picket line. The winter was a severe one, and all material operations were suspended until its close. Late in February. Lieutenant Jesse McNeil, who was in command of his father's old company, with forty or fifty men of that company and Woodson's, made a dash into Cumberland, Maryland, at night and captured and brought off Major Generals Crook and Kelly, with a staff officer of the latter, though there were at the time several thousand troops in and around Cumberland. The father of th
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
ision (U. S. A.), 408-09, 417 Wilson, Major J. P., 144, 150, 187 Winchester, 163~ 240-41, 243-44, 249- 253, 284, 333-34, 367-70, 382, 385, 391, 397-400, 406, 408, 410, 412- 414, 417, 419-20, 425-26, 435, 439, 450-453, 455, 457, 475 Winchester & Potomac R. R., 163, 368, 414 Winder, General, 94, 95, 96, 97 Winston, Captain, 148 Winston, Colonel, 60 Wirz, Captain, 296, 297, 298 Wise, General, 76, 132 Woffard's Brigade, 444, 446, 449 Wolf Run Shoals, 10, 47, 48, 50 Woodson's Company 460, 461 Woodstock, 368, 430, 454 Wounding of Jackson, 212 Wright, General, 83, 231, 233, 255, 257 Wright, General (U. S. A.), 392, 393 Wrightsville 235, 255, 259, 260-61- 262-63-64 Wynn, Captain, 215 Wynn's Mill, 60, 61, 62, 63 Wytheville, 466, 467 Yates' Ford, 12, 13 York, 253, 255, 258-64, 267 York, General, 423 York River, 57-58-59, 65 York River R. R., 77 York Road, 269-71, 273, 357 Young's Branch, 26 Zoar Church, 318-20, 322-23
isoner to one of Sheridan's staff. Meanwhile Gilmore's men had learned of his trouble, but the early appearance of Colonel Whittaker caused them to disperse; thus the last link between Maryland and the Confederacy was carried a prisoner to Winchester, whence he was sent to Fort Warren. The capture of Gilmore caused the disbandment of the party he had organized at the camp-meeting, most of the men he had recruited returning to their homes discouraged, though some few joined the bands of Woodson and young Jesse McNeil, which, led by the latter, dashed into Cumberland, Maryland, at 3 o'clock on the morning of the 21st of February and made a reprisal by carrying off General Crook and General Kelly, and doing their work so silently and quickly that they escaped without being noticed, and were some distance on their way before the colored watchman at the hotel where Crook was quartered could compose himself enough to give the alarm. A troop of cavalry gave hot chase from Cumberland, s
ken. Five hundred cases of yellow fever were reported in Wilmington, N. C. The mortality was very great, thirty or forty dying daily. The publication of the Journal newspaper had to be suspended, as almost all the hands necessary to carry on the work were sick with the fever. President Lincoln issued an order establishing a Provisional Court for the State of Louisiana, and appointing Charles A. Peabody, of New York, to be a Provisional Judge to hold the court.--(Doc. 11.) Major Woodson, of the Tenth cavalry, Missouri State militia, attacked a band of rebel guerrillas on Auxvois River, dispersed them, killing and wounding several, capturing arms, ammunition, blankets, and horses.--The Twenty-seventh regiment Maine volunteers, left Portland this morning for the seat of war. Lieutenant-Colonel James Stuart, with a portion of the Tenth Illinois cavalry, attacked two hundred rebel cavalry near Marshfield, Mo., this day, completely routing and disorganizing them, and ca
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 7: the siege of Charleston to the close of 1863.--operations in Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. (search)
were disbanded, and joined themselves to other organizations. Their crime produced the greatest horror and indignation, and for awhile there was no disposition to give quarter to guerrillas; and when, ten days after the sacking of Lawrence, Colonel Woodson, with six hundred Missourians, swept down from Pilot Knob into Northern Arkansas, and at Pocahontas, on the Big Black River, captured the famous guerrilla chief, General M. Jeff. Thompson, and about fifty of his men, Colonel Woodson sent Colonel Woodson sent forward Captain Gentry, of the Second Cavalry of the Missouri State Militia, to seize Thompson. He found that famous chief sitting quietly in his office, tracing a map of Southeastern Missouri, in perfect security as he supposed, for he did not think there was a National soldier within a hundred miles of him. Thompson was astonished, but not disconcerted. He declared it was too bad to interrupt him, for, if they had let him alone two weeks longer, he would have had three thousand men at his c
rs and follies, official and personal, endangered the success of the Democracy in pending State elections; or, rather, until he resolutely and publicly declared at Lecompton that he would not any longer be deceived and used by the ruffians. Mr. Woodson, the Secretary of State, thrice the Acting Governor of Kansas--a man who never faltered in sustaining the Missouri mobs — who hounded on the Carolina and Alabama robbers to the sack of Lawrence and the desolation of the Free State settlements — was retained in office, and with honor, until, on the acceptance of Geary, it was necessary to replace him by Dr. Gihon, whose appointment that gentleman insisted on as an indispensable condition precedent to it. Was Woodson dismissed? No! the faithful — the unfalteringly faithful — are never so disgraced; except, indeed, at rare intervals and for a brief period only. He is now one of the chiefs of the land office at Kickapoo — a faithful town and a well-rewarded one! To Geary's admin
re unable to keep them in sight; and, in short, Quantrell, dodging many times his force, who were after him, rested a while that night 5 miles north-east of Paoli, and escaped next day into the timber of the middle fork of Grand river, Missouri; where his band scattered, seeking and finding concealment with congenial spirits throughout the surrounding region. Perhaps 100 of them were overtaken and killed in the pursuit; but the greater number escaped, and were soon indistinguishable. Col. Woodson, with 600 Missourians, starting Aug. 21. from Pilot Knob, Mo., dashed into Pocahontas, Aug. 24. Ark., where he captured Gen M. Jeff. Thompson and some 50 others; returning unmolested. The surrender of Vicksburg and Port Hudson, with the retreat of Jo. Johnston from Jackson, having left Gen. Grant's army at leisure, Maj.-Gen. F. Steele was sent to Helena, July 31. to fit out and lead an expedition for the capture of little Rock. The force assigned him for this task numbered 6
n time to form upon the right of Gen. Slack, where they rendered most prompt and efficient service. For full particulars of the operations of this battalion, I refer you to the report of Lieut.-Col. Major. In the several engagements referred to, I regret the necessity of enumerating so large a list of killed and wounded, hereinafter stated. Before closing this report of the sanguinary battle of the 10th, I beg leave to make my acknowledgments to my staff; also Cols. Robert Walker and Woodson, my assistant aids; especially do I desire to bring before your particular notice the gallant and intrepid manner in which my orders were conveyed by Lieut.Cols. Wm. O. Burton and Samuel Farmington, the former of whom had two, and the latter one horse shot under them, while delivering orders. Throughout the entire engagement, these officers were distinguished for their bravery and dauntless valor. I desire, also, to make my acknowledgments to Col. J. Q. Burbridge, who was severely wound
n time to form upon the right of Gen. Slack, where they rendered most prompt and efficient service. For full particulars of the operations of this battalion, I refer you to the report of Lieut.-Col. Major. In the several engagements referred to, I regret the necessity of enumerating so large a list of killed and wounded, hereinafter stated. Before closing this report of the sanguinary battle of the 10th, I beg leave to make my acknowledgments to my staff; also Cols. Robert Walker and Woodson, my assistant aids; especially do I desire to bring before your particular notice the gallant and intrepid manner in which my orders were conveyed by Lieut.Cols. Wm. O. Burton and Samuel Farmington, the former of whom had two, and the latter one horse shot under them, while delivering orders. Throughout the entire engagement, these officers were distinguished for their bravery and dauntless valor. I desire, also, to make my acknowledgments to Col. J. Q. Burbridge, who was severely wound
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...