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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 65 11 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 39 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 22 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 21 1 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 9 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for John L. Worden or search for John L. Worden in all documents.

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lying under the guns of Fort McAllister, on the Great Ogeechee, Georgia, by the Montauk, Commander J. L. Worden, whose inclosed report states succinctly the interesting particulars. The department of the public as a troublesome pest. I am, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, John L. Worden, Commanding Senior Officer present. To Rear-Admiral S. F. Du Pont, Commanding S. A. Blockadt. Immediately we went to quarters, and the United States steamer Seneca, by permission from Capt. Worden, steamed up the river to reconnoitre. She went to within two miles of the Nashville, and by an aground, was now falling, and her condition was every moment becoming worse and worse. Captain Worden would have moved up to attack her if he had thought it judicious, but he saw she could not g marine, and let the country congratulate itself upon having such a servant and defender as Commander Worden, whose judicious caution and whose promptness and will have secured <*>e destruction of thi
er Daniel Ammen, one fifteen-inch Dahlgren and one two hundred pound Parrott. The Montauk, (monitor,) Commander John L Worden, one fifteen-inch and one eleven-inch Dahlgren, which was held as a reserve. The Nahant, (monitor,) Commander Downs, o fight, the Wissahickon, Dawn, Sebago, Seneca, and Flambeau being at anchor near the mortar-boats, whilst the Montauk, Capt. Worden, took position in advance of the wooden vessels, and in sight of the conflict, but took no part in it. The three mo Fort. Their invulnerability to the projectiles of the enemy had been fully ascertained by the previous conflicts of Captain Worden with the same works, and by his successful destruction of the Nashville whilst exposed to the guns of the Fort, to which he paid no attention. In alluding to the destruction of the Nashville by Capt. Worden, in my last letter, I omitted to mention that the enemy succeeded in exploding one of his torpedoes directly under the hull of the Montauk, slightly jarring
. Each ship will be prepared to render every assistance possible to vessels that may require it. The special code of signals prepared for the iron-clad vessels, will be used in action. After the reduction of Fort Sumter, it is probable the next point of attack will be the batteries on Morris Island. The order of battle will be the line ahead, in the following succession: 1. Weehawken, with raft, Capt. John Rodgers. 2. Passaic, Capt. Percival Drayton. 3. Montauk, Commander John L. Worden. 4. Patapsco, Commander Daniel Ammen. 5. New Ironsides, Commodore Thos. Turner. 6. Catskill, Commander Geo. W. Rodgers. 7. Nantucket, Commander Donald McN. Fairfax. 8. Nahant, Commander John Downes. 9. Keokuk, Lieut. Commander Alex. C. Rhind. A squadron of reserve, of which Captain J. F. Green will be senior officer, will be formed out-side the bar, and near the entrance buoy, consisting of the following vessels: Canandaigua, Capt. Joseph H. Green. Unadil