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ere playing upon us. Our regiment was very fortunate — not a man hurt. Rebels hugged the ground very close. The mortar-boats were busy the whole time shelling the city. Half-rations of pea-bread and poor beef constitute our living — hard fare. Our regiment was relieved to-night by the Thirty-eighth Mississippi; we moved to the right of the Jackson road; kept as reserve; good night's rest. June 3.--We are laying to the right of the Jackson road. Heavy firing all day. We lost today Lieut. Yancey, of company K. Our rations are changed; we now get one half rations bread, rice and corn-meal mixed. We hear again that Johnston is advancing in force. It's our only hope. June 4.--The firing is more moderate to-day. The fleet has kept up a pretty continued fire all day; the firing upon the ditches has been confined to skirmishers. The loss of our brigade since the eighteenth of May in killed and wounded is two hundred and seventy-five. We are still in reserve. June 5.--The w
of restless spirits among the extremists of the South, that would be satisfied with nothing short of a dissolution of the Union. Of this class of politicians, W. L. Yancey may be fitly selected as representative man. He immediately began to agitate the question again. He went to the Democratic National Convention at Baltimore, iled down to moderate proportions; and even after this, it is doubtful if they could have succeeded in the Presidential election of 1860, if the Secessionists with Yancey at their head, had not determined that they should succeed. After Mr. Yancey and his party had, against their wishes, succeeded in getting their ultimatum of nonMr. Yancey and his party had, against their wishes, succeeded in getting their ultimatum of non-intervention incorporated into the Cincinnati platform, they went to work to conjure up another to present to the Charleston Convention. Abandoning their doctrine of non-intervention, they went to the opposite extreme and demanded that the intervention of Congress for the protection of slavery in the territories should constitut
ssed desire of General Beauregard, ere he be definitely assigned to any position. Understanding that the assignment of General Beauregard to Charleston has been pressed upon the government by the Governor and Council of South Carolina, we tender herewith the names of the representatives of that State, as expressive of their assent to our petition. It is but justice to General Beauregard to say that this step is taken without his knowledge or consent. Ed. Sparrow,La. T. J. Semmes, W. L. Yancey,Ala. L. C. Haynes,Tenn. H. C. Burnet,Ky. J. B. Clark,Mo. —Peyton, G. A. Henry,Tenn. L. T. Wigfall,Texas. —Mences, C. W. Bell,Mo. C. J. Villere,La. G. D. Royston,Ark. J. M. Elliott,Ky. David Clopton,Ark. G. W. Ewing,Ky. W. N. Cooke,Mo. F. S. Lyon,Ala. J. Perkins, Jr.,La. C. M. Conrad, J. Wilcox,Texas. P. W. Gray, T. B. Cexton, J. C. Atkins,Tenn. W. G. Swan, H. S. Foote, T. B. Handle,Ark. H. W. Bruce,Ky. R. J. Breckinridge, W. R. Smith,Ala. E. L. Gardenshire,Tenn
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), William Lowndes Yancey, [from the Moutgomery, Ala., daily Advertiser, April 15, 1893.] (search)
or a word, and the proper word always came. Mr. Yancey was a born orator, and had no equal in the Sly aim is to vote for the winning ticket. Mr. Yancey supported Breckinridge and Lane with enthusiar, and so preparations were scant. While Mr. Yancey contributed more than any other individual ter aspirants. There was a great jealousy of Mr. Yancey, on account of his superior eloquence and hite Senate chamber in retaliation for something Yancey had uttered in a speech. He lived long enoughssion would not be followed by war, and that Mr. Yancey shared such belief. But for the Confederateat was the deliberate and matured opinion of Mr. Yancey, notwithstanding he was regarded as a hot-spsed the ordinance of secession, and of which Mr. Yancey was a member, informed me that towards the close of its session Mr. Yancey delivered a speech in secret session, of two hours duration, in whicha war. Of the purity and unselfishness of Mr. Yancey's motives, there can be but one opinion by s[5 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The laying of the corner-stone of the monument to President Jefferson Davis, (search)
vied-their unfeigned and abiding love. He teaches us that life offers something better than success. It is when moral worth is defeated that humanity becomes sublime. As a soldier, his brilliant and promising career was cut short. He had no opportunities to develop the great qualities of Lee, the prince of commanders. As a statesman, he did not quite reach, perhaps, the commanding stature of Calhoun, to whose work he succeeded. As an orator, he may have lacked the impetuous fervor of Yancey, the splendid declamation of Lamar. He surpassed them all in his majestic strength, the chaste beauty of his thoughts, and his thrilling earnestness. But Davis was greater than them all, in that he combined them all. He was an accomplished soldier, a great statesman, and a consummate orator. He was the typical Southerner of his day and of all times. Stands above them all. Around him stood that marvellous group—Lee, the flower of chivalry; Jackson, the genius of war; Toombs, the thu
e Confederate States or anywhere else. He possesses a superior intellect, sound practical sense, much experience, enlarged views, pure private character, and is emphatically a working man, and withal is a Christian gentleman. It would prove greatly to the interests of the department and the public interests if he would accept. I presume his large practice as a lawyer, his regard for the interests of his clients, is the bar in the way of his acceptance. Again, he is the partner of the Hon. W. L. Yancey, who, you are advised, will leave next week as the head of the important Embassy to the European Powers, so that if Mr. Chilton should take the seat in the Cabinet, no one would be left to attend to the numerous causes in which the firm is engaged. The members of our volunteer companies, lately at Pensacola, are busily engaged to-day in rubbing up their weapons, which would look as if they were preparing for another expedition, probably to Charleston, to participate in the attac
Ordered off. --Robert S. Tharin, a lawyer, of Lowndes county, Ala., was punished and sent off last week, for making secret proposals to non- slaveholders for the establishment of an Abolition Society and the publication of a paper to be called the "Non-Slaveholder." He was for a time a law partner of Hon. W. L. Yancey. It is believed he is deranged. So says the Cahaba Gazette.
Mr. Yancey. Hon. W. L. Yancey, has written a letter from London to the editor of the Montgomery Advertiser, saying that if elected by the Legislature as Confederate Senator from Alabama, he would serve in that capacity. His letter concludes as follows: If I cannot finish my mission here, or shall not be honorably recalled before the 1st January, I shall ask the President to recall me. I came here reluctantly, at his request — at great personal and pecuniary sacrifice — which I cannoHon. W. L. Yancey, has written a letter from London to the editor of the Montgomery Advertiser, saying that if elected by the Legislature as Confederate Senator from Alabama, he would serve in that capacity. His letter concludes as follows: If I cannot finish my mission here, or shall not be honorably recalled before the 1st January, I shall ask the President to recall me. I came here reluctantly, at his request — at great personal and pecuniary sacrifice — which I cannot continue longer than then, as long as the country has so many able men who can supply the vacancy to be made by my retire
Alabama Confederate States Senators. Montgomery, Ala. Nov. 21. --The Hon. W. L. Yancey, and the Hon. C. C. Clay, Jr., were elected to-day Confederate Senators.--Mr. Yancey was elected on the first ballot, and received all the votes but two. Alabama Confederate States Senators. Montgomery, Ala. Nov. 21. --The Hon. W. L. Yancey, and the Hon. C. C. Clay, Jr., were elected to-day Confederate Senators.--Mr. Yancey was elected on the first ballot, and received all the votes but two.
n was adopted pledging all the resources of the Confederacy to support the state of Virginia in the determination expressed by her Legislature to drive the enemy from her borders and maintain the ancient boundaries of the Commonwealth. Under the resolution dividing the Senators into three classes, whose terms shall be, respectively, of two years, four years, and six years, the ballots were drawn with the following result: Terms of present Senators. Alabama.--C. C. Clay, 2 years; W. L. Yancey, 6 years. Arkansas--Mr. Johnson, 2 years; Mr. Mitchell, 6 years. Florida--Mr. Baker, 2 years; Mr. Maxwell, 4 years. Georgia.--Mr. Toombs, 2 years; Mr. Hill, 6 years. Kentucky.--Mr. Simms, 2 years; Mr. Burnett, 6 years. Louisiana--Mr. Semmes, 4 years; Mr. Sparrow, 6 years. Mississippi.--Mr. Phelan, 2 years; Mr. Brown, 4 years. Missouri.--Mr. Clarke, 2 years; Mr. Peyton, 4 years. North Carolina.--Mr. Davis, 2 years; Mr. Dorisch, 4 years. South Carolina.--Mr. Barnwell, 4 ye
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