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nce. Every preparation for the retreat was silently made. The ordnance and army supplies were quietly moved southward; and measures were also taken to unburden Nashville of the immense stores accumulated in depot there. The weather was wet and cold, and very trying to men unused to the hardships of a winter campaign. Only 500 were in hospital at Bowling Green; but, before the army reached Nashville, 5,400, out of the 14,000, fell under the care of the medical authorities. Medical Director D. W. Yandell, in making this report at Nashville, February 18, 1862, says this large number is to be accounted for by the immense number of convalescents and men merely unfit for duty or unable to undertake a march. On February 11th, everything being in readiness, the troops began their retreat, Hindman's brigade covering the rear. Breckinridge's command passed through Bowling Green on the 12th, and bivouacked on the night of the 13th two miles north of Franklin. It was on that Thursday
the first one he could find, but to proceed until he could find Dr. Yandell, the medical director, and bring him. The general's hold upon hi of the right leg, where it divides into the tibial arteries, as Dr. Yandell informs the writer. He did not live more than ten or fifteen mitourniquet, had he been aware or regardful of its nature. Dr. D. W. Yandell, his surgeon, had attended his person during most of the mornn, including many Federals, at one point, General Johnston ordered Yandell to stop there, establish a hospital, and give them his services. He said to Yandell: These men were our enemies a moment ago, they are prisoners now; take care of them. Yandell remonstrated against leavingYandell remonstrated against leaving him, but he was peremptory, and the doctor began his work. He saw General Johnston no more. Had Yandell remained with him, he would have hYandell remained with him, he would have had little difficulty with the wound. It was this act of unselfish charity which cost him his life. General Beauregard had told General J
t field-officers. Captain Fremeaux, provisional engineers, and Lieutenants Steel and Helm, also rendered material and ever-dangerous service in the line of their duty. Major-General (now General) Braxton Bragg, in addition to his duties of chief of staff, as has been before stated, commanded his corps-much the largest in the field — on both days with signal capacity and soldiership. Surgeon Foard, medical director; Surgeons R. L. Brodie and S. Chopin, medical inspectors; and Surgeon D. W. Yandell, medical director of the Western Department, with General Johnston, were present in the discharge of their arduous and high duties, which they performed with honor to their profession. Captain Tom Saunders, Messrs. Scales and Metcalf, and Mr. Tully, of New Orleans, were of material aid on both days; ready to give news of the enemy's positions and movements, regardless of exposure. While thus partially making mention of some of those who rendered brilliant, gallant, or merito
Chapter 37: the end. Not reckless. estimates of character by Colonel Munford, by General Preston, by Major Haydon, Colonel Jack. reminiscences of Rev. R. D. Chapman, of Rev. E. Fontaine, of Dr. D. W. Yandell. description in Harper's Weekly. estimate by Thomas F. McKinney, by the New York times, by General William J. Worth. reminiscences of Rev. Dr. Galleher, of Colonel J. W. Avery. estimate by General W. C. Whitthorne. anecdote by Lieutenant J. M. Fairbanks. Scott and Davis ad my life. General Johnston's deliberation is illustrated by his remark to a precipitate friend who was about to run across a street in front of a carriage driving rapidly: There is more room behind that carriage than in front of it. Dr. D. W. Yandell, General Johnston's medical director, furnishes the following incident: While at Corinth, the owner of a drug-store, living in Tennessee, near to Donelson, represented to the general that his entire stock of drugs had been taken by a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.46 (search)
r its control by an extemporized tourniquet had he been aware or regardful of its nature. Dr. D. W. Yandell, his surgeon, had attended his person during most of the morning; but, finding a large number of wounded men, including many Federals, at one point, General Johnston had ordered Yandell to stop there, establish a hospital, and give them his services. He said to Yandell: these men were ouYandell: these men were our enemies a moment ago; they are our prisoners now. Take care of them. Yandell remonstrated against leaving him, but he was peremptory. Had Yandell remained with him, he would have had little diffiYandell remonstrated against leaving him, but he was peremptory. Had Yandell remained with him, he would have had little difficulty with the wound. Governor Harris, and others of General Johnston's staff, promptly informed General Beauregard of his death, and General Beauregard assumed command, remaining at Shiloh ChurcYandell remained with him, he would have had little difficulty with the wound. Governor Harris, and others of General Johnston's staff, promptly informed General Beauregard of his death, and General Beauregard assumed command, remaining at Shiloh Church, awaiting the issue of events. up to the moment of the death of the commander-in-chief, in spite of the dislocation of the commands, there was the most perfect regularity in the development of
s control by an extemporized tourniquet, had he been aware or regardful of its nature. Dr. D. W. Yandell, his surgeon, had attended his person during most of the morning, but finding a large number of wounded men, including many Federals, at one point, General Johnston ordered Yandell to stop there, establish a hospital, and give them his services. He said to Yandell, These men were our enYandell, These men were our enemies a moment ago, that are prisoners now; take care of them. Yandell remonstrated against leaving him, but he was peremptory, and the doctor began his work. He saw General Johnston no more. Had Yandell remonstrated against leaving him, but he was peremptory, and the doctor began his work. He saw General Johnston no more. Had Yandell remained with him, he would have had little difficulty with the wound. It was this act of unselfish charity which cost him his life. Life of A. S. Johnston, by his son. When rumors beYandell remained with him, he would have had little difficulty with the wound. It was this act of unselfish charity which cost him his life. Life of A. S. Johnston, by his son. When rumors began to be circulated in Richmond that a battle had been fought and won at Corinth, the President endured the keenest anxiety; when remonstrance was made against his depression he said, I know Johnsto
s. The bakery had a capacity somewhat larger than was necessary for the hospital, and at times baked, by contract, a part of the bread for the prisoners in Belle Isle and Libby. From a series of articles prepared by Doctor Samuel H. Stout, Medical Director of the Army of Tennessee, we learn that the change of climate caused much sickness among the troops drawn from the Gulf States to Tennessee and Kentucky during the winter of 1861-62, and that only by the greatest exertions was Medical Director Yandell able to provide for the care of the sick. Most of these were sent to Hospital life. Hospital life for those well enough to enjoy it was far from dull. Witness the white-clad nurse with her prim apron and hoopskirt on the right of the photograph, and the band on the left. Most hospitals had excellent libraries and a full supply of current newspapers and periodicals, usually presented gratuitously. Many of the larger ones organized and maintained bands for the amusement
s. The bakery had a capacity somewhat larger than was necessary for the hospital, and at times baked, by contract, a part of the bread for the prisoners in Belle Isle and Libby. From a series of articles prepared by Doctor Samuel H. Stout, Medical Director of the Army of Tennessee, we learn that the change of climate caused much sickness among the troops drawn from the Gulf States to Tennessee and Kentucky during the winter of 1861-62, and that only by the greatest exertions was Medical Director Yandell able to provide for the care of the sick. Most of these were sent to Hospital life. Hospital life for those well enough to enjoy it was far from dull. Witness the white-clad nurse with her prim apron and hoopskirt on the right of the photograph, and the band on the left. Most hospitals had excellent libraries and a full supply of current newspapers and periodicals, usually presented gratuitously. Many of the larger ones organized and maintained bands for the amusement
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Appendix D: organization and personnel of the medical Department of the Confederacy (search)
onfederate army boards were thorough, complete, and eminently practical. Each applicant was required in a given number of hours to fill out the answers to a number of written questions, under supervision of the secretary of the board; and this being done, he was invited into an adjoining room and submitted to an oral examination to the satisfaction of the assembled board. The Confederate board of examiners serving with the Department and Army of Tennessee, as I remember, consisted of Dr. D. W. Yandell, of Louisville; Dr. J. F. Heustis, of Mobile, and Dr. Stanford E. Chaille, of New Orleans, all being well-known teachers of medicine and surgery in their respective States, and at that time, or subsequently, of national reputation. Other medical examining boards were of like character. The late Doctor Chaille, the dean of the medical department of Tulane University, in a private letter, speaks of the work of the examining boards appointed in 1862 to report on the competency of the me
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
lm's brigades, the Forty-seventh Georgia, and Waters' South Carolina battery, reporting 8.194 for duty. There were also in Johnston's army the majority of the Kentucky troops, the Third, Seventh and Eighth regiments, with many Kentucky officers assigned to important duties. Gen. Lloyd Tilghman, a most gallant officer, had been killed in the Baker's Creek battle, near Edwards' Depot, a short time before; Gen. Abram Buford and Gen. Geo. B. Cosby were in command of cavalry brigades, and Dr. D. W. Yandell had become medical director on General Johnston's staff. The campaign which followed was one of great hardship and of small results; the weary marches, the unhealthful climate and bad drinking water being especially severe on the Kentuckians. Vicksburg fell on the 4th of July, and with the battle of Gettysburg just preceding, marked a fatal turning point in the fortunes of the Confederacy. The only engagement of any note in which General Breckinridge's command participated was on
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